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Old 08-16-2013, 04:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plmokn View Post
So you are asking where are the economic conditions so bad that only BW TVs are affordable (even though the programming was broadcast in color)?
I suppose so, yes. Or countries that didn't broadcast in color until quite late.
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Old 08-16-2013, 04:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
I suppose so, yes. Or countries that didn't broadcast in color until quite late.

OK, then those are two completely different questions and is the reason I specifically asked in post 8.
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Old 08-16-2013, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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The last to change to color in Euripe were Turkey and Albania, in 1981. There was a gradual change to color in Israel, Cyprus and Lebanon between then and 1983. Israel might hqave been the last holdout, militantly resisting the introduction of color.


One major, developed country never had black and white. South Africa's first TV station went on the air in 1975, and it was in color from the start.

I didn't have a color TV in my home until 1987, when I moved and left my old BW behind and bought a used Color set. That was in the USA. I completely sold out, and even subscribed to cable. My parents got their first TV in 1952, so I watched only BW for 35 years.

Last edited by jtur88; 08-16-2013 at 06:32 PM..
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Old 08-16-2013, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Oviedo
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I still have a small b/w tv that I have in my camper (along with a converter box and antenna, lol)
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Old 08-16-2013, 07:35 PM
 
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I think the OP is talking about mainstream broadcasts and sales. In the 1st world west, I think Australia was probably one of the last hold outs. I don't think they started their color broadcasts until 1970 or so. Many parts of Africa were later. I know my wife has said that China was still mostly B/W until the early 80s. She said her family didn't get their first color set until around 1987.
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Old 08-16-2013, 08:28 PM
 
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Israel. 1983.

The Israeli government considered the import of color televisions as frivolous and a luxury that would increase social gaps. Therefore, the government ordered IBA and IETV to erase the colour from colour-taped telecasts by erasing the "burst phase" signal. The "damaged" signal triggered the "colour killer" mechanism, installed in colour TV sets to prevent the appearance of incidental colour spots on the screen when black-and-white films are broadcast or when the reception is disturbed. This method was named mekhikon (Hebrew: מחיקון‎ "eraser"), and soon after its introduction, special TV sets with an anti-mekhikon (Hebrew: אנטי-מחיקון‎ "anti-eraser") device were offered. This device reinstalled the burst phase signal according to several known standards. The client had to turn a switch until the pictures on the screen appeared in natural colours. According to a report in Yediot Aharonoth from January 1979[8] clients had to manipulate the switch every 15 minutes on average in normal conditions, or up to 10 times an hour when special problems occurred, in order to restore natural colours or if the picture suddenly turned black and white.
Based on information from owners of electricity appliance stores, the report estimated that 90% of those who bought colour TV sets also bought the anti-mekhikon device, whose price ranged between 2,500 and 4,000 Israeli lirot (the TV set itself cost 40-50 thousand lirot).
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Old 08-16-2013, 09:11 PM
 
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Apparently there were still over 13,000 black-and-white TV licenses in the UK at the start of 2013:

Black and white television still No1 choice for 13,000 UK homes

That's out of almost 25 million total licenses - so in other words, 0.052%. That sounds about right for most of the developed world.

According to this article from 1987, black and white TV sales began to collapse around 1982, and major retailers stopped carrying them in their display rooms a few years later:

B&w Fading Out? Sales Of Larger Black And White Tv Sets, Especially, Are Dwindling As Consumers, And Merchandisers, Turn To Color Television.

As for where B&W tvs held on the longest, others have cited some good examples. By the 1990's, though, it was increasingly just correlated with poverty. Color TVs fell in price, and as B&W TVs broke or were replaced, color TVs were pretty much the only thing on the market - anywhere.

Quote:
Is it possible that B&W television is still common in some areas of the world today
From what I gather, the only country still actively making monochrome television monitors for the consumer entertainment market is North Korea, and that's probably because they already have a factory set up and don't wish to change it or shut it down just yet. But even there, broadcasts are apparently in color, and color TVs are replacing B&W sets.

Otherwise, you can still buy newly-built monochrome sets, but they are mostly for specific uses, such as business/retail terminals with a limited number of functions (since apparently monochrome is more readable and is easier on the eyes over long periods of time). Companies no longer market those as televisions.
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Old 08-16-2013, 09:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tablemtn View Post

Otherwise, you can still buy newly-built monochrome sets, but they are mostly for specific uses, such as business/retail terminals with a limited number of functions (since apparently monochrome is more readable and is easier on the eyes over long periods of time). Companies no longer market those as televisions.

It's funny, you can't even find monochrome computer monitors anymore. It doesn't matter the type, NTSC, TTL, or VGA. Nothing. I still like the old NTSC type monitors for certain functions. They're sharp as hell, and easy on the eyes.
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:39 PM
 
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My parents house!
They finally got a color TV in late 1980s.
I purchased a little 13" BW in mid 80s through one of those closeout catalogs very cheap ($49). It was serviceable until mid 90s when I donated it to a garage / rummage sale. I don't recall any BW TVs being sold after early 90s, unless it was through some closeout type operator.
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Old 08-16-2013, 11:06 PM
 
3,053 posts, read 4,110,485 times
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You could by a black and white TV till about the mid 80ies in the USA, even a small hand held B/W Sony Watchman type. The change from black and white to color was not like the change to digital. A B/W TV. Uses the same analog signal that a color TV does so they never really were made obsolete the same way. (i.e. a black and white TV would have worked right up to the switch to digital). During the development of Color TV a method was found to add color to the B/W signal without making B/W TV's obsolete.

What happened was that a black and white TV was cheaper than a color TV for a long time but over time Color TV’s got cheaper. Eventually color TV’s got cheap enough that people stopped buying B/W and they stopped selling them in the US in the 80ies. The black and white TV was slowly squeezed into the low end market or speciality market(small hand held) for a TV and then into oblivion.

I wacthed some late 70ies/early 80ies stuff on B/W as a kid. Also to add some understanding about the history of TV and how long it took B/W to die. Color TV was invented in the mid 50ies and cost $1000 back then!

TV over time have gotten cheaper such that if you were to compare a Family of the 80ies to one of the 90ies (or even today). On average the 80ies family would have about 1 less television per household and the TV’s they would have would be about a size smaller than the ones in the late 90ies.

Then as now lager TV equals larger price and so black and White had a market in the small cheap TV set for a bedroom/guest room/work place(if you owned your own business) for a long time after being squeezed out of the market for say the high end living room/family room model that impresses guests. My family had a portable B/W one with an handle! Calling that thing portable by today's standards is a laugh as it was quite heavy.

Last edited by chirack; 08-17-2013 at 12:03 AM..
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