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Old 08-16-2013, 12:37 PM
 
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Now here's a thought...

Eating out became popular after the wife went back to work in the late 70s/early 80s but still cooked dinner.....

...in a Crock Pot.

Enough of that slop...off to the restaurant.
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Old 08-16-2013, 01:29 PM
 
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Upon visiting the mid sized town I grew up in Nebraska, I got a hold of a phone book from the local library, from 1964, and looked in the yellow pages under restaurants and noticed there was no chains, no Chinese, no Mexican, no Italian places, no fast casual or fast food. Just a couple bar and grills and a few fancy spots. Now there is more than one hundred places in a town of 40K.
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Old 08-16-2013, 01:34 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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Grow up as a middle class child, we rarely ever went out to eat, unless it was to celebrate a special occasion (Christmas, Birthday, Thanksgiving, etc). Because of this experience, I was always "programmed" to think that going out was reserved for special occasions only.

My father eventually moved up the corporate ladder and we started eating out a lot more, "just for the heck of it" and I recall going out with my parents, brother and sister one Saturday, as a young child for lunch (non-holiday or special occasion) and I asked my mother: "today is not a holiday, why are we going out?"
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:34 PM
 
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Well, I was born in the late 70's, midwest. But, growing up in the 80's in my small midwestern town, eating out was not something that happened often, with anyone. So even though my timeframe is not what you asked for, I do agree. My mom stayed home all through my childhood, and we didn't have a lot of money as a family. My parents preferred to be frugal anyway. They worked hard and never did anything on credit. They preferred to save and save.

So, when I was a teen in high school, that is when on Fridays and only Fridays, we might get take out (not eat at a restaurant) my parents weren't really people-persons. But they'd bring home a pizza, or get Long John's drive through, or pick up subs at the local sub shop. Still, nothing major. Of course it helped that I was raised in a town that did not have many restaurants.

I never ate out much either, once I was over 18 my friend and I enjoyed going out once a week to a restaurant maybe. Eating out was just not something you did much. Then once I got married and got to know other couples, and those with kids, it surprised me how much people (esp those with kids - and SAHMs!) ate out! It was like ALL the time. Also, for the first time I lived in a real city with TONS of restaurant choices. My SIL eats out ALL the time - her kids tell me there's never food in the house and she never cooks. It's really weird to me how this is the norm now. Sometimes I'll chat with someone maybe at work, etc and we notice it too. At my job, almost all the women bring in breakfast, AND lunch from fast food chains, AND they talk about takeout for dinner. AND they all talk about being broke and overweight! HELLO!

I think it's about lifestyle and even with SAHMs the ones I know insist of having their kids in so many activities, I think they feel they don't have time. It's a habit they form and it's just something they do and they think it's just the way it is.

I, too, was always programmed to think it was just special occasions.
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Old 08-16-2013, 04:43 PM
 
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I would guess probably the 80s?
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Old 08-16-2013, 06:01 PM
Status: "Uncomfortably numb" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm Retired Now View Post
A visit to the town I grew up in, but left 45 years ago, last week made me think about the history of eating out and restaurants. One of the things that hit me about my home town of so many years ago was the incredible number of places to eat that are available now days. And the incredible number of ethnic food available even in a relatively homogeneous mid sized town in the American Midwest.

When I was a kid there in the 1950s and 1960s no one went out to eat except for special events. There were no fast casual restaurants, ethnic food, and fast food only came in in the very late 1960s. Even pizza, Chinese and Mexican food was really uncommon.

The big shopping mall that was built in the 1960s had no food except for a snack bar. There was no food court!

What is your memory of going out to eat in the 1950s and 1960s, if you are old enough to remember?
I was born in 1958. I was one of 7 kids and my parents grew up in the Depression and were frugal. We went out to eat probably once or twice a year. We used to go out for my grandmother's birthday to this place that I thought was far away out in the country. (It's really only about half an hour from where I grew up--the building is still there though the restaurant is different now.) They had something on the menu called "Chicken in a basket" that I thought was the most wonderful thing I had ever tasted. It was fried chicken and french fries, but that was not something my mother ever cooked.

The other time we would go out was when we were on vacation. There was a German restaurant in the area where we went on vacation in the Poconos in the summers, and we all loved it there. It was our big night out for the vacation--the rest of the time, my mother usually cooked. Besides that, we might have a hamburger out at a local fast-food place (but I never went to a McDonald's as a child.)

I first had pizza with my Girl Scout troop, probably at about age 9. I still remember it. I'd sensed that I was the only one who had never had pizza before, so I pretended I liked it just like the other girls. Then I ate it, and I didn't have to pretend anymore.

I also remember a friend's family inviting me out with them to a Chinese restaurant and when I got there and we got our menus, they asked what I liked and I told them I'd never eaten Chinese food before. They were all kind of shocked and laughed at me. I guess I just got whatever my friend got. I don't remember. I just remember feeling humiliated because apparently Chinese food was something everyone else knew about.

There certainly were not the number and types of restaurants around that there are now, as others have noted.

I like to point out to the young'uns that before 1980, no one ever heard of something called "pasta", and the idea that people would pay $15 for a plate of noodles would have brought big laughs back in my day!
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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I was born in 1952, I had a glass of chocolate with my mother at a Woolworths Counter when I was about 10 and when I was 12 I went out to eat with a friend at a Chinese restaurant (with her family for her birthday). That was the total of my "eating out" until I was a junior in high school in 1968/69. I did have meals at weddings but never at a place where you would order and pay for food (except for those two times).

Hmmm, eating out only two times in your first 17 years on Earth? I wouldn't be surprised if some/many Amish and Mennonite teenagers, today, have eaten in restaurants/fast food places/diners more often than that.
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Old 08-17-2013, 02:06 AM
 
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i can remember when my mother didnt have a license, the role of the woman in the workplace changed the whole country in many ways..

in the 50's and 60's many women did not work,,,they were happily cooking, cleaning and breeding

in the 70,s and 80's is when more and more women went into the workplace full-time.. (and most still had to do the cooking and cleaning

when theres no time to cook....fast food hits the spot..- especially if you are hauling your kids around for activities.
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Old 08-17-2013, 04:50 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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I was raised in the 50s and 60s too. We got all dressed up a few times a year and went out to dinner for special occasions. I remember my parents went to Ken's Steakhouse (the salad dressing people) for their anniversary.

Through the 80s and 90s it was still special to us. We still dressed up and went to nice restaurants with friends. In the 80s, when the kids were young we took the whole family to cheap places on Friday nights...6 people for $15.00.

I remember introducing my grandson, in the mid 90s to McDonalds and it was a special treat, not usual. Like soft drinks, it was a rare treat.

Now, we are semi retired and have stopped eating out very much because we are usually disappointed in the quality and expense. We only eat fast food when we're on the road and need to throw something down to stop the hunger pangs. We would never eat it otherwise, but if I had kids going from place to place all the time I'm sure I get them fast food on the way.
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Old 08-17-2013, 05:58 AM
 
177 posts, read 369,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
i can remember when my mother didnt have a license, the role of the woman in the workplace changed the whole country in many ways..

in the 50's and 60's many women did not work,,,they were happily cooking, cleaning and breeding
Lol, happily? If they were so happy doing it, they would still be doing it... hahaha
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