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Old 08-22-2013, 01:02 PM
 
12,741 posts, read 17,721,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plmokn View Post
Sort of related, but here in California I see a lot of laborers working in the sun, picking crops, construction, drying cars - on 80F+ degree days. I'm amazed that most of these guys wear one or two layers of long sleeved clothing to protect themselves from the sun - even in that heat. When I look at that, it seems I would pass out if I dressed that way.
To many of us, long-sleeves are cooler than short sleeves in low humidity settings. Not so in high humidity.
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Old 08-22-2013, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 30to66at55 View Post
Men use to go to baseball games in suits.

My father and his brother and brothers-in-law would never be seen without a suit on if they were going out to an event...or even going out for a sunday drive with the family.

I even remember run of the mill local restaurants requiring every man to be wearing a suit jacket. If you didnt have it...they found some mis-matched jacket for you to wear.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreutz View Post
I have a photo of my great grandfather taken in 1936 of him and his family camping. In the photo he is putting up the tent in slacks, suspenders, and a tucked in dress shirt.

Just the way it was back then I guess.
It was the defacto dress code of the times -- and proof you weren't too poor and too ignorant to live in civilized society. Only farmers wore denim pants, usually with bibs and called "overalls", even into the 1960s. Factory workers and other blue-collar types wore "work pants", ie, cotton/twill pants. When they weren't working, however, even if they didn't wear ties, men would change into dress shirts and slacks. Women wore dresses or skirts even at home ... and usually hats and white gloves to church, restaurants, and other public events. The only exceptions were equestriennes.

I graduated from high school in 1968. Blue jeans of any kind and t-shirts were forbidden for boys or girls. So were sneakers except for gym. Slacks on girls were forbidden except at post-football game dances (they weren't allowed for post-basketball games, however). Shorts were totally forbidden except for class picnics in June. For the long and the short of it, both miniskirts and granny skirts (both just coming into vogue) were forbidden. So were shoes with more than a 1 or 1.5 inch heel.

I went to a public school in a small town (not so affectionately referred to as "Gestapo High" by many students, and not just for the dress code rules). It was truly "a different world". Going to college was like being freed from prison.
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Old 08-22-2013, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,673,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plmokn View Post
Sort of related, but here in California I see a lot of laborers working in the sun, picking crops, construction, drying cars - on 80F+ degree days. I'm amazed that most of these guys wear one or two layers of long sleeved clothing to protect themselves from the sun - even in that heat. When I look at that, it seems I would pass out if I dressed that way.
I'll bet its all cotton. Keeping sun from direct contact with skin will keep you cooler. And as you sweat the damp clothes also pull heat away from the body. When I made my renfair duds, EVERYThing near the skin was cotton. And you take a glass of water and dump it in when you're feeling hot and it instantly cools you.

Actually if your out in the sun a lot, covering the skin with light colored absorbant material even when its much hotter will keep the body temperature down more than the flow of hot air.

I remember when men had summer suits made of cotton and wool blends, which breathed in heat, and winter ones which were warmer. The ones I bought for myself when I had to wear them were after one mistake, all natural fibers. I didn't like suits but they did make you feel a good way, professional and respectable. What really bugged me was that women's suits cost so much more than mens and I never could see why.
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Old 08-22-2013, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
I think being dressed up is over rated. I am glad society is less formal today.
I agree. I wouldn't like it if I had to get fussed up for the grocery store. But I'd really like it if now and then, like to a nice restraunt, it would be more common to dress up. I often do dress nicer for that but most seem to be in the same old same old. To me dressing nicer is a sign its special.

I think there is a place for dressing up and while its good we don't live 24/7 that way we may have swung a bit too far the other direction.
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Old 08-22-2013, 07:22 PM
 
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I can remember my mother wearing white gloves to church.

100 years ago in Cuba, they invented the embroidered white shirt as a way to look dressy without a tie. You often see Filipino American men wearing these too, to church, etc.
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Old 08-22-2013, 07:24 PM
 
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I can remember my mother wearing white gloves to church.

100 years ago in Cuba, they invented the embroidered white shirt as a way to look dressy without a tie. You often see Filipino American men wearing these too, to church, etc.
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Old 08-22-2013, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreutz View Post
I have a photo of my great grandfather taken in 1936 of him and his family camping. In the photo he is putting up the tent in slacks, suspenders, and a tucked in dress shirt.

Just the way it was back then I guess.
Another difference is the amount of clothes we have. Most people of modest means had one formal outfit and others which would be formal today but were not then. Women wore dresses, and had a clear distinction between their dress up dress or two and the house dresses. House dresses got replaced for more public moments but the old ones were worn for less public moments until they became kids ourdoor chore clothes or eventually rags. We did not dispose of clothes just because the style was out or they were a little worn. Children wore handmedowns for dirty play/work.

Today we have a lot more clothes to wear because we can get them so cheap. Style is more important for the average person than it was and style changes far more often. To the Victorians (which would be around 1900, not that long ago) we are walking around in underware. Most of the rest is something that workman would wear. And everyone wore a hat, and not just baseball caps.

There was a huge difference in clenlieness then too. Many people still did not have modern bathrooms and baths were weekly. Clothes were washed, but bathing the whole body (as aversed to the parts which require daily cleaning) was not done on a daily basis. Clothes were not worn a day and then washed either. We just have a few extra tubs of clothes to choose from so we don't run out.

There were also very clear definations of formal moments. People did dress nicely for dinner, and there were matts and the kids put out the silverware, and they all knew where it went. It was an occasion. Even 'ordinary' families did this.

In addition to cheaper clothes, a different attitude towards what they say, and a disposable society, there are a lot of other factors which changed things. Sometimes I wish we had kept some of the formal touches since maybe we swung too far away from them.

These standards alive and well in 1900 and 1936 as well, were still there in 64 and I don't think any of these men would have even considered their suits unsuitable for a warm summer day.
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:15 PM
 
6,740 posts, read 7,257,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
I have five doctors whom I see on a twice-yearly basis. Every one of them is wearing dress shirt and tie, except for one who wears a white lab coat - OVER his dress shirt and tie. I'm not sure how much confidence I'd have in any one of them if they greeted me in jeans or sweats and a tee shirt. I'm sure they do wear jeans or sweats, but they do it at the appropriate time. When I was hospitalized, almost every doctor was wearing a suit or sport coat and khakis.

My attorney works in shirt sleeves, but when a client is ushered into his office, he puts on his suit coat. I did see him at a parade with his children and he had on a golf shirt and jeans. It was the appropriate venue.

When I see people wearing camo, knowing they aren't in the military, I'm tempted to ask if they plan to enlist. I saw a woman at the store today, wearing a nice purple two-piece suit, looking very spiffy - except for the silver gladiator heels she was wearing. Not an outfit I'd put together.

It's a shame that golf courses had to make rules about what people should wear on the course. It's a shame that some people think that their clothes are their form of personal expression. Civility is always appropriate. And respectful.
And yet, one of the absolute best cardiologists/cardiac surgeons in Tucson generally wears scrubs and Birkenstocks. Trust me, you'd rather he operate on you rather than the shirt & tie-wearing surgeon who could not get privileges. Appearances can be deceiving.
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Old 08-22-2013, 08:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryMB View Post
"If men can run the world, why can't they stop wearing neckties? How intelligent is it to start the day by tying a little noose around your neck?" Linda Ellerbee
Who the hell is Linda Ellerbee? Why should men care what she thinks?

I agree with the OP, though. People should definitely dress better. It's not just about dressing in suit and tie. It's about dressing good period. People aren't dressing less formal. They are dressing like slobs. I've met women in their 50s who have told me they sometimes use nylons to tie their hair for the grocery store. Nothing wrong with wearing a polo and nicely pressed khaki shorts. But even that is too much for people.
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:09 PM
 
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I have seen pictures from the 40s with all fans wearing suits and fedora at ball games.
But its not about clothes. Its about our way of life that changed and became causal. Relations between people are no longer formal, at work or between neighbors. People are rude and disrespectful, starting with little kids at school.
Clothes are only an expression of these deeper social changes. Nobody is going to dress better when you don't care about people around you.
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