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Old 08-22-2013, 09:22 PM
 
11,084 posts, read 9,364,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBigGuy View Post
Who the hell is Linda Ellerbee? Why should men care what she thinks?

I agree with the OP, though. People should definitely dress better. It's not just about dressing in suit and tie. It's about dressing good period. People aren't dressing less formal. They are dressing like slobs. I've met women in their 50s who have told me they sometimes use nylons to tie their hair for the grocery store. Nothing wrong with wearing a polo and nicely pressed khaki shorts. But even that is too much for people.
Award-winning television journalist, producer, anchor, reporter, founder of Lucky Duck Productions and author of both fiction and non-fiction who has worked on many, many news programs (including "The Today Show", "Good Morning, America", and "NBC News Overnight" on NBC, ABC, and other networks, Linda Ellerbee and her work have been recognized with Emmys and multiple Peabody Awards. A cancer survivor, she is active in speaking out in support of cancer research and early diagnosis.
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Arizona
6,520 posts, read 6,050,076 times
Reputation: 20274
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBigGuy View Post
Who the hell is Linda Ellerbee? Why should men care what she thinks?

I agree with the OP, though. People should definitely dress better. It's not just about dressing in suit and tie. It's about dressing good period. People aren't dressing less formal. They are dressing like slobs. I've met women in their 50s who have told me they sometimes use nylons to tie their hair for the grocery store. Nothing wrong with wearing a polo and nicely pressed khaki shorts. But even that is too much for people.
There is something wrong with khaki shorts if you are the type that shouldn't wear shorts. That would include most men.
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Old 08-22-2013, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Here.
14,814 posts, read 13,684,568 times
Reputation: 17390
That's all they had. It wasn't until polyester clothing came out (which didn't have to be ironed) that people started dressing down. And then they started making polyester-blend suits which are unbearably hot and uncomfortable, making them even less desirable.

Men would wear their old suits for work clothes and everyday wear and save their new suit for Sundays and special occasions.
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Old 08-23-2013, 04:38 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,606 posts, read 8,424,717 times
Reputation: 19704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emeraldmaiden View Post
And yet, one of the absolute best cardiologists/cardiac surgeons in Tucson generally wears scrubs and Birkenstocks. Trust me, you'd rather he operate on you rather than the shirt & tie-wearing surgeon who could not get privileges. Appearances can be deceiving.
I don't live in Tucson, so I can't address your comment, except to say that a "surgeon" who can't get privileges isn't operating on anyone. The cardiothoracic surgeon who replaced the valve in my aorta wears scrubs when in the OR and when making post-op rounds, because it's the appropriate venue.
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Old 08-23-2013, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,673,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retroit View Post
That's all they had. It wasn't until polyester clothing came out (which didn't have to be ironed) that people started dressing down. And then they started making polyester-blend suits which are unbearably hot and uncomfortable, making them even less desirable.

Men would wear their old suits for work clothes and everyday wear and save their new suit for Sundays and special occasions.
Fortunately, polyester proved more like plastic wrap then fabric. Its in blends but most common fabrics today breath. Lucky for all of us.

Men also wore white shirts. My dad got a blue one for Christmas and refused to wear it. My uncle got one much the same and he finally was convinced to try it. Everyone told him it looked very good on him, and he would wear it but ONLY that shade of blue. He never would wear the darker blue shirt we gave him.

Back then, people generally wore their clothes until they wore them out and didn't toss anything with some kind of use so old suits coats would work fine for work. That is a value I wish we hadn't lost, but its not universally gone. The thrift shops are really good in areas where people continually revise their wardrobes. They are much less good clothes and other things wise where even today things get used mostly until used up.

Personally of all the ideas of the sixties and clothes, I think polyester was the worse by a long shot.
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Old 08-23-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,845,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
I have seen pictures from the 40s with all fans wearing suits and fedora at ball games.
But its not about clothes. Its about our way of life that changed and became causal. Relations between people are no longer formal, at work or between neighbors. People are rude and disrespectful, starting with little kids at school.
Clothes are only an expression of these deeper social changes. Nobody is going to dress better when you don't care about people around you.
IMO, the way Americans "cared" about "the people around you" for a long time was dangerous to the life, liberty, and happiness of many of their fellow Americans for a long, long time. Was it polite for whites to lynch black Americans for transgressions real or imagined? Was it polite for Jews to barred from many country clubs, private schools, and housing developments? Was it polite for male bosses to importune their female employees? Was it polite for the law and society to pretend that wife-beating and child abuse didn't happen?

Sorry, but formal clothes and surface civility were only facades that masked the hypocracy that permeated American society until late 1960s/early 1970s.
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Old 08-23-2013, 08:01 AM
 
11,181 posts, read 10,233,587 times
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Recently I was called for jury duty. When all of us gathered in the initial meeting room, many were dressed appropriately (casual business attire). However, there were some who were dressed in shorts, t-shirts, and even a few wearing flip flops!

When we were called in groups to the actual court room, I was glad to hear the judge announce: "For those of you who will be serving on the jury, starting tomorrow I don't want to see you in shorts and flip flops, it is expected that you wear casual business attire."
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Old 08-23-2013, 10:19 AM
 
32,525 posts, read 32,455,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post

My POINT is that here in Canada, military veterans would never be seen at a public event, such as on November 11th, Remembrance Day, in anything but their best clothing, and wearing their medals with pride. No ball hats, no t shirts, no jeans. And , remember, many of our younger veterans are in their 20;s and 30's, not 90's.
Interesting.

My DH marched in the parade through Washington, D.C. on the day the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated. A lot of the guys wore jeans with the jackets/shirts they had worn in country. Many wore their boonie hats.

The atmosphere of that parade was dictated by the fact that there had been no parades for them when they came home. They wore what the wanted and made a statement about who they were: a bunch of men and women who had served in an unpopular war, many of them drafted into it, finally getting recognition for what they had done. That day was about finding a buddy's name on the Wall and remembering him. It was also about finding friends they hadn't seen since they left Vietnam. Pomp and circumstance wasn't very high on their list.
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Old 08-23-2013, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,742 posts, read 3,610,632 times
Reputation: 7676
DewDropInn.

Thanks for your reply.

You may be interested to learn that out of 56 males in my 1964 high school graduating class, here in Toronto, Ontario, seven of them Volunteered to join the US military, and six served in Vietnam, and one died there. They were all Canadian citizens by birth.

At that time, the US military had a way of masking the citizenship of those who were Canadian, by assigning an American "home town " to them, on their records. All of my class mates, on the dd214 were shown as having been living in a New York town or city, not in Canada. Those from Quebec would be shown as living in Plattsburgh, or Albany. those from Ontario would be shown as coming from Buffalo or Rochester.

Canada has a much different military history than the US does. We have never started a war, and we have won all that we have been involved in. As a result, our population has a strong sense of pride in our military members, and support them. In return, we who do serve now, or have served, are careful in our appearance, while on duty, or attending a military ceremony, such as the 120th Anniversary parade that I featured in the video that I posted here.

As a former soldier, I can say with no hesitation, that when the regular battalion of our Regiment is on parade, they are being closely watched by " The Old Guys ", who served in the unit in the years gone by. To be praised by men who spent five years overseas, from 1939 to 1945, in WW 2, and who came back alive, is great praise in deed. The 48th Highlanders of Canada are just as much a "family " as it is a military unit.

About 40,000 Canadians served in the US military, in the Viet Nam era. 107 of them died there and are named on "The North Wall " in Windsor, Ontario.

Dileas Ghu Brath. Faithful forever. The motto of the 48th.

And our unofficial national military motto. Never Retreated, Never Defeated.

Cheers Jim B.

Toronto.
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Old 08-23-2013, 12:55 PM
 
32,525 posts, read 32,455,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
DewDropInn.

Thanks for your reply.

You may be interested to learn that out of 56 males in my 1964 high school graduating class, here in Toronto, Ontario, seven of them Volunteered to join the US military, and six served in Vietnam, and one died there. They were all Canadian citizens by birth.

At that time, the US military had a way of masking the citizenship of those who were Canadian, by assigning an American "home town " to them, on their records. All of my class mates, on the dd214 were shown as having been living in a New York town or city, not in Canada. Those from Quebec would be shown as living in Plattsburgh, or Albany. those from Ontario would be shown as coming from Buffalo or Rochester.
That's very interesting. I did not know that. Then the name of the man who was killed is on the Wall in D.C. (?)

Thanks for some great posts on this thread. I've learned a lot.
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