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Old 03-30-2010, 03:11 PM
 
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Kevin Bacon is from Philly and can do an interesting accent. In one movie, not a bad one but one not really known, he plays a guy who lives in a haunted hosue in Boston. He does an accent that varies from Bostonian to south Philly. " Yo, Adrian, pahk the Cah."
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Old 03-31-2010, 09:16 AM
 
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As for who has the coolest american accent i have to give that to ..... Mr T
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Old 03-31-2010, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Michigan--good on the rocks
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Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
As for who has the coolest american accent i have to give that to ..... Mr T
You sure it isn't Fran Drescher?
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Old 03-31-2010, 03:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by stanman13 View Post
You sure it isn't Fran Drescher?
LOL... i was thinking more the likes of Laverne on ''Laverne and Shirley''
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Old 04-02-2010, 04:23 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
How about the difference between Aussie, Kiwi and South African accents? I always try to see if I can peg those.
If you can you should check out 'Accents of English' by J.C.Wells, very informative if a bit technical. I'm a linguistic buff myself, so know a bit about it.

Anyway, how accents are shaped by a wide variety of factors; history, outside influences, internal developments. Australian is most similar to British today because not only we were founded alot later than America, but we're genetically more British and Brits are still streaming in.

South Africa is more Dutch-influenced, while NZ more Scottish influence, due to their settler's patterns.

As people have pointed out the English accent in the 1600's is probably closer to modern day American than typical 'British' (Southern English, to most Americans).
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Old 04-02-2010, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
If you can you should check out 'Accents of English' by J.C.Wells, very informative if a bit technical. I'm a linguistic buff myself, so know a bit about it.

Anyway, how accents are shaped by a wide variety of factors; history, outside influences, internal developments. Australian is most similar to British today because not only we were founded alot later than America, but we're genetically more British and Brits are still streaming in.

South Africa is more Dutch-influenced, while NZ more Scottish influence, due to their settler's patterns.

As people have pointed out the English accent in the 1600's is probably closer to modern day American than typical 'British' (Southern English, to most Americans).
Interesting. To me, Australian accents resemble Scottish accents more than English. I can easily distinguish between Australian and English accents, but it's harder when it comes to distinguishing between Australian and Scottish. I sense Irish influence in the Australian accent as well and that seems to be the main distinguishing factor between Oz English and Kiwi English - certainly there are more genetic ties...

I can't distinguish between educated South African (regardless of race) and Southern English (UK, not USA) at all, but the uneducated white and mixed-race accent seems to sound to me like it has heavy influence from Northern England as well as the Netherlands. Were Lancashire and Merseyside major sources of emigration to South Africa? Then there are also accents that seem influenced by the indigenous languages like Zulu and Xhosa.
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Old 04-02-2010, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Queensland
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Originally Posted by majoun View Post
Interesting. To me, Australian accents resemble Scottish accents more than English. I can easily distinguish between Australian and English accents, but it's harder when it comes to distinguishing between Australian and Scottish. I sense Irish influence in the Australian accent as well and that seems to be the main distinguishing factor between Oz English and Kiwi English - certainly there are more genetic ties...

I can't distinguish between educated South African (regardless of race) and Southern English (UK, not USA) at all, but the uneducated white and mixed-race accent seems to sound to me like it has heavy influence from Northern England as well as the Netherlands. Were Lancashire and Merseyside major sources of emigration to South Africa? Then there are also accents that seem influenced by the indigenous languages like Zulu and Xhosa.
Likewise, interesting. I would say Scottish accents sound nothing like Australian accents. I can barely understand a highland Scottish accents. I also think Irish is more an influence in the US than Australia, because Irish tend to pronounce 'r' whereas Australians drop the 'r'.

Quite a difference between British South African English accent and Afrikaans South African English, I think.
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Old 04-02-2010, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Originally Posted by TropicalAussie View Post

Quite a difference between British South African English accent and Afrikaans South African English, I think.
I think the "uneducated" accent I referred to was the Afrikaans accent.
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Old 04-02-2010, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Still in Portland, Oregon, for some reason
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Pennsylvania accents (Philadelphia particularly) are a mixture of New York and Canadian, if you ask me and I lived there for three years. It is very subtle though and I certainly did pick it up while I was there.

People in the Pacific Northwest don't have much of a discernible accent or a specific way of pronouncing certain words. They tend to be a bit more soft-spoken than other West Coast dialects but there is nothing there that will instantly click with those and make it recognizable.
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Old 04-03-2010, 05:34 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,544 posts, read 56,186,229 times
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Originally Posted by TropicalAussie View Post
Likewise, interesting. I would say Scottish accents sound nothing like Australian accents. I can barely understand a highland Scottish accents. I also think Irish is more an influence in the US than Australia, because Irish tend to pronounce 'r' whereas Australians drop the 'r'.

Quite a difference between British South African English accent and Afrikaans South African English, I think.
I have to agree with you, sorry Tropical but I have to question your hearing! Jimmy Barnes, btw, does not a typical Scottish accent .

To me they couldn't be more different. Foreigners sometimes confuse Australian and Southern English, but linguistically Scottish and Australian are worlds apart.

South African is a very distinctive accent, I would say closest to Australia but still very different.
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