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Old 04-03-2010, 07:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
Interesting. To me, Australian accents resemble Scottish accents more than English. I can easily distinguish between Australian and English accents, but it's harder when it comes to distinguishing between Australian and Scottish. I sense Irish influence in the Australian accent as well and that seems to be the main distinguishing factor between Oz English and Kiwi English - certainly there are more genetic ties...

I can't distinguish between educated South African (regardless of race) and Southern English (UK, not USA) at all, but the uneducated white and mixed-race accent seems to sound to me like it has heavy influence from Northern England as well as the Netherlands. Were Lancashire and Merseyside major sources of emigration to South Africa? Then there are also accents that seem influenced by the indigenous languages like Zulu and Xhosa.
Australian and Scottish sound alike to you?? Irish is more like Scottish than like Australian.
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Old 04-03-2010, 09:51 AM
 
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I guess to me australian sounds a bit like southern british english with a twang of the american south mixed in it
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Old 04-03-2010, 10:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
I guess to me australian sounds a bit like southern british english with a twang of the american south mixed in it
Before I knew people with both accents, I thought Australian and South African sounded a like.

I have a midwest accent and a few people in the UK asked me if I was Irish! Huh! I know several Americans here who've been asked the same. I can't even imitate an Irish accent. Or a Scottish one. And I've lived here 10 years!
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Old 04-03-2010, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Midwestern Dystopia
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we didn't really change the way we talked in america, it was the english that changed the way they talk during the great vowel shift. This mostly occured after the US colonies were formed and explains why countries like Aus, NZ, So. Africa that were formed later have acents that sound more like the english.

there was a subtle change in america due to other immigrants from other countries but there are isolated pockets (think appalachia or outer islands of the carolinas) where people talk more closly like americans did 200 years ago.

regarding english and australian accents: although there are dozens of english accents (and about 3 recognised aust.) the basic difference that holds true concerns the vowels. Aussies stretch them out and english chop them off quickly.

now to understand the new zealand accent......
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Europe
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Originally Posted by Leovigildo View Post
Yes, you're a bit right.
They should be called Irish Protestants or Unionists.
Thats not 100% true either, as I am neither Protestant or Unionist but am an Irishman and have Scottish planter ancestory.

Also the term Scots-Irish ignores the fact that many Protestant Native Irish and Protestant Anglo-Irish + some Catholics of Native Irish, Catholic Highlander/Islander & Catholic Anglo-Irish from Ulster where lumped in under the category of Scots-Irish just because they came from the ancient province of Ulster.

Through the mists of time many of these Native Irish, Anglo-Irish, even Flemish, French and some Germans who had resided in Ireland have convinced themselves of Scots ancestory and some who think they are border Scottish may actually be Gaelic Highland/Island Scots or border English.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Europe
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Originally Posted by majoun View Post
Found in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, etc. as well.
Ya its found in Hiberno-English here in Ireland too.

Its not that the British, Irish, Canadians, Aussies etc. add a U, Americans drop the U.
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post

Western PA I'd consider to be part of the Midwestern/Great Lakes English zone.
There are some regional variations even in the Rust Belt states. Pittsburgh has a linguistic quality distinct from, say, Southern Ohio-- which historically had far more in common with other Appalachian states than with Northern Ohio. Before Columbus outgrew its "smallish cow-town" stage, the linguistic division split rather neatly along Rte 40.

As for Southern accents, my youngest learned to talk in the Low Country of South Carolina. She's mostly lost the accent since moving away (and sounds like a Floridian, God help her), but it still surfaces a little when she tries out a word she's read and isn't quite sure how to pronounce.
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
Interesting. To me, Australian accents resemble Scottish accents more than English. I can easily distinguish between Australian and English accents, but it's harder when it comes to distinguishing between Australian and Scottish.
And then there's Glaswegian, which to my Southern-US-influenced ears bears no discernable resemblance to English whatsoever.

glaswegian accent - Video - YouTube (http://www.wikio.com/video/glaswegian-accent-2750353 - broken link)
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Old 04-05-2010, 09:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Aconite View Post
And then there's Glaswegian, which to my Southern-US-influenced ears bears no discernable resemblance to English whatsoever.

glaswegian accent - Video - YouTube (http://www.wikio.com/video/glaswegian-accent-2750353 - broken link)
I'm married to someone who grew up in Glasgow but hasn't lived there for 40 years. His family lives there though and even after 10 years I still have trouble understanding some of them. It has gotten much easier, but it's still tough. Glaswegian delivery men phone for directions to our house and if I can I hand the phone to hub.
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Old 04-06-2010, 09:12 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,717,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Badger View Post
we didn't really change the way we talked in america, it was the english that changed the way they talk during the great vowel shift. This mostly occured after the US colonies were formed and explains why countries like Aus, NZ, So. Africa that were formed later have acents that sound more like the english.

there was a subtle change in america due to other immigrants from other countries but there are isolated pockets (think appalachia or outer islands of the carolinas) where people talk more closly like americans did 200 years ago.

regarding english and australian accents: although there are dozens of english accents (and about 3 recognised aust.) the basic difference that holds true concerns the vowels. Aussies stretch them out and english chop them off quickly.

now to understand the new zealand accent......
So why was there the ''Great Vowel Shift'' if there was little or no immigration in Great Britain during that time era??
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