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Old 09-07-2010, 11:50 AM
 
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O.k. i'm going to gab about dialect and not accent on this post however i have a good friend on another internet forum from london who types/speaks Cockney or Posh as she calls it as at times it's really hard to understand her and is always cracking me up with her wording
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Old 09-07-2010, 12:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
O.k. i'm going to gab about dialect and not accent on this post however i have a good friend on another internet forum from london who types/speaks Cockney or Posh as she calls it as at times it's really hard to understand her and is always cracking me up with her wording
My brother-in-law is from Manchester and, even after a decade in the States, I sometimes need him to repeat himself. He's a huge sports nut, and loves the Auburn Tigers, so it's kind of fun to watch him hang out with other Auburn fans. I bet they've never hear chalk talk like that.

However, his father is far, far less understandable. The man practically needs subtitles.
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Old 09-07-2010, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Way back, PBS ran a series on Masterpiece Theater called Poldark. (and if its available on dvd I STILL want it). Its about a lower Cornish gentry who returns after release as a pow in our war of independence. Its very fascinating about the way the society was changing at the time. But it was filmed in Cornwall and many of the villagers were played by natives of the area. It took a while to have the slightest idea what they said. I loved that they used the native accent because it made it so authentic, but at times you really needed subtitles. The gentry had no trouble understanding them of course, though they were all schooled in "proper" english. That was the chief mark of class distinction. The children of those who made money in manufacturing were also schooled in proper language so they could mix with and enter the gentry.

There was a wonderful series about the development of English also, I believe called The Story of English. I remember that they had a Carolina native, with the full dialect of today, read Shakespeare. The rythems of the words worked very well, far better than with "proper" english. It is believed that is much closer to the accent found in England at the time of Shakespeare and the predominant settlement of the colonies occured at this time. So we took the language to one (or some would say many) differnt directions and the British took it to other different ways.
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Old 09-07-2010, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,434,878 times
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Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
O.k. i'm going to gab about dialect and not accent on this post however i have a good friend on another internet forum from london who types/speaks Cockney or Posh as she calls it as at times it's really hard to understand her and is always cracking me up with her wording
Cockney is the, at times, hard-to-understand working-class accent of east London. If she refers to it as 'posh' she is being sarcastic since there is nothing posh about Cockney.

Posh accents and dialects are usually the easiest for Americans to understand.
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Old 09-08-2010, 06:23 AM
 
13,134 posts, read 40,676,330 times
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Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Cockney is the, at times, hard-to-understand working-class accent of east London. If she refers to it as 'posh' she is being sarcastic since there is nothing posh about Cockney.

Posh accents and dialects are usually the easiest for Americans to understand.
Your spot about east london and Cockney ABQ ..... as she's from east london and she's told me she lives close by the area where Jack The Ripper did all his killings way back then


I told her i like it when she speaks Cockney to which she replied ... ''Yep i am ain't i dead Posh me, first words i said when i was very small ... Muver me barnet hurts !!''
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