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Old 11-16-2013, 02:27 PM
 
3,463 posts, read 4,855,585 times
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Vietnam and the end of our steel industry vis a vis japan.
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Old 11-16-2013, 03:44 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
16,653 posts, read 19,453,483 times
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For me, what kimmie and midcenturymod said. Also Dungeons and Dragons will make you a suicidal murderer who sniffs glue and kills kittens... when you are not killing yoursef or others just because you lost ten hit points.
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Old 11-16-2013, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,850,272 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I am 55.

Some things I remember that I've talked to my daughter about were how different things were for women back and how they were changing when I was growing up.

For example, does anyone remember the TV shows on women who were in prison for murder for killing their husbands when there were police records showing that the women had been beaten and abused for years? The abuse didn't matter back then--they went to jail for murder no matter what, and some were beginning to get their convictions overturned. I remember watching one such story. The police had photos of what would eventually become known as "domestic violence" incidents of this woman with bruises, and there were medical records, but back then the cops just told everyone to calm down and then left and no arrests would be made. Eventually her husband attacked and beat her one too many times and she killed him in self-defense then went to prison for murder. She appealed and the conviction was overturned. They interviewed her dead husband's parents and asked them what they thought about the way their son had beaten her, and they said, "She was his wife." That was a pervasive mentality that doesn't exist anymore or at least isn't seen as acceptable by as much of society as it did thirty-forty years ago.

I went to an event at Women's Day magazine in the early 90s and met a woman who had done the first in-depth article for a national magazine on domestic abuse--in 1975. That may seem like a long time ago to some of the youngsters on here, but it really is not that long ago. In addition, in most states, men were allowed, by law, to force their wives to have sex with them and if they didn't want to, too bad. It wasn't rape by law.

Less violently, televisions shows in the 70s like The Mary Tyler Moore Show dealt with women receiving less pay for the same job, justified because they were women. And the help-wanted ads in newspapers were still divided into "Help Wanted Male" and "Help Wanted Female" sections.

I sometimes buy old magazines at estate sales. I have a Life Magazine from 1969 with a Hertz rental car with a model and the caption, "Our girls are not only pretty, they can answer your questions." There's another ad for Northwest Oriental Airlines that shows two groups of what are now called flight attendants, then stewardesses. One group is of white women, the other is of Asians, and the caption is that "we have American girls to help you feel at home, and Orientals to help you get where you need to go." It almost looks like an ad for prostitution. My 22-year-old daughter was amazed that such ads were permitted.
I'm a bit older than you, 63. When I was 14, I knew what I wanted to be: an equine veterinarian, literally a horse doctor. My guidance counselor was horrified, and he very effectively discouraged me. It never occurred to him that I had been around horses all my life (I have a photo of me sitting on a pony at age six months with my mom propping me up), that I grew up on a farm caring and doctoring animals, that my parents supported me in this but, being poorly educated themselves, didn't know how to help me.

I think that's when I really became a feminist, although it would be several years before that term came into use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by STB93 View Post
What about comic books? There seemed to be a huge uproar over the comic book industry in the 1950s with the book "Seduction of the Innocent".
Comics, along with many other things, were banned in my school district, even in high school, but calling it "conservative" didn't do it justice. We students less-than-affectionately referred to it as Gestapo Central School and our principal as Carl the Nazi. College was like visiting another planet.
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Old 11-16-2013, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 14,381,824 times
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When a was a little kid, there were still Commies hiding under every table and my unformed mind was obviously twisted by that "race music" I liked so much even though I had no idea why. By the time I got to high school, the length of boys' hair was a major preoccupation of the school administration, along with keeping girls out of miniskirts. Exposed knees and hair touching a collar were clearly the gateways to becoming a "dirty hippie." Because we all know every dirty hippie was the next Charles Manson, no matter how much flower power and peace and love were touted.
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Old 11-16-2013, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Pérouges
581 posts, read 717,101 times
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What are some things you remember from your youth that society was foaming at the mouth over?

What the future held for our country. Whether we'd be recognised as a state. If the embargoes would be lifted. If we'd win the war against insurgents. Was it going to be safe to stay where we were. Were the British going to stick to their rumoured threat and not allow people to resettle there.

There were quite a few issues which "society was foaming at the mouth" over when I was young.
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Old 11-16-2013, 07:16 PM
 
3,901 posts, read 5,484,702 times
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It's a myth that everyone loved the Kennedy's. People in rural areas, or the tens of millions who were raised in rural backgrounds, actually could not identify with the Kennedy's lifestyle/ background at all, and many were suspicious of the family - although 2 were war heroes.

And, Pat Boone sold nearly as many records as Elvis Presley, but today Pat Boone is completely forgotten, erased from the history books. Reminds me of how the main character Winston in Orwell's story "1984" was paid to erase events from history books.
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Old 11-16-2013, 07:22 PM
Status: "Uncomfortably numb" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
64,788 posts, read 61,095,360 times
Reputation: 78952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
I'm a bit older than you, 63. When I was 14, I knew what I wanted to be: an equine veterinarian, literally a horse doctor. My guidance counselor was horrified, and he very effectively discouraged me. It never occurred to him that I had been around horses all my life (I have a photo of me sitting on a pony at age six months with my mom propping me up), that I grew up on a farm caring and doctoring animals, that my parents supported me in this but, being poorly educated themselves, didn't know how to help me.

I think that's when I really became a feminist, although it would be several years before that term came into use.



Comics, along with many other things, were banned in my school district, even in high school, but calling it "conservative" didn't do it justice. We students less-than-affectionately referred to it as Gestapo Central School and our principal as Carl the Nazi. College was like visiting another planet.
I'm sorry you were discouraged from being what you wanted to be. I know another woman about your age, a nurse. Runs the hospice program in her hospital, always going back to school to learn more and get another certification.

She wanted to be a doctor. Her parents and her school both discouraged her.
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Old 11-17-2013, 02:49 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
14,864 posts, read 14,261,932 times
Reputation: 24075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I am 55.

Some things I remember that I've talked to my daughter about were how different things were for women back and how they were changing when I was growing up.

For example, does anyone remember the TV shows on women who were in prison for murder for killing their husbands when there were police records showing that the women had been beaten and abused for years? The abuse didn't matter back then--they went to jail for murder no matter what, and some were beginning to get their convictions overturned. I remember watching one such story. The police had photos of what would eventually become known as "domestic violence" incidents of this woman with bruises, and there were medical records, but back then the cops just told everyone to calm down and then left and no arrests would be made. Eventually her husband attacked and beat her one too many times and she killed him in self-defense then went to prison for murder. She appealed and the conviction was overturned. They interviewed her dead husband's parents and asked them what they thought about the way their son had beaten her, and they said, "She was his wife." That was a pervasive mentality that doesn't exist anymore or at least isn't seen as acceptable by as much of society as it did thirty-forty years ago.
No-fault divorce and changing the laws so women could get custody of the children made a big difference. The abuse defense seems to have died out since women have had other options. I know that in my state, when they passed mandatory prison sentences for a number of crimes, the female prison population increased rapidly for a decade. They had to build new women's prisons to accommodate all the new inmates. Prior to mandatory prison terms, judges treated women as minors and just gave them probation sentences.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I went to an event at Women's Day magazine in the early 90s and met a woman who had done the first in-depth article for a national magazine on domestic abuse--in 1975. That may seem like a long time ago to some of the youngsters on here, but it really is not that long ago. In addition, in most states, men were allowed, by law, to force their wives to have sex with them and if they didn't want to, too bad. It wasn't rape by law.

Less violently, televisions shows in the 70s like The Mary Tyler Moore Show dealt with women receiving less pay for the same job, justified because they were women. And the help-wanted ads in newspapers were still divided into "Help Wanted Male" and "Help Wanted Female" sections.

I sometimes buy old magazines at estate sales. I have a Life Magazine from 1969 with a Hertz rental car with a model and the caption, "Our girls are not only pretty, they can answer your questions." There's another ad for Northwest Oriental Airlines that shows two groups of what are now called flight attendants, then stewardesses. One group is of white women, the other is of Asians, and the caption is that "we have American girls to help you feel at home, and Orientals to help you get where you need to go." It almost looks like an ad for prostitution. My 22-year-old daughter was amazed that such ads were permitted.
I remember the time. It was a standing joke that girls were in college to get their MRS degree. This was when the pill was still new. My fiancee went to a doctor to get a prescription for birth control, and he wouldn't give her one because she wasn't married. He felt it was his duty to act in loco parentis, because her father obviously wasn't doing his job.

It was like the spirit had been stomped out of all the young women. They avoided adventure and did what they were told. Housing at college was strictly segregated, and they had curfew on all the women's dorms, 10:30 on week nights and 1 AM on Friday and Saturday nights. Remember "Ladies Night" at the local taverns? Women could drink free, just to get them in the door.

Equal pay has been the law of the land since 1963. It's certainly the most ignored law in history.

The changing role of women has been the biggest single story of the last 50 years, but other than big events like bra burning or Roe v. Wade, it has mostly been a quiet revolution.
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:27 AM
Status: "Uncomfortably numb" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
64,788 posts, read 61,095,360 times
Reputation: 78952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
No-fault divorce and changing the laws so women could get custody of the children made a big difference. The abuse defense seems to have died out since women have had other options. I know that in my state, when they passed mandatory prison sentences for a number of crimes, the female prison population increased rapidly for a decade. They had to build new women's prisons to accommodate all the new inmates. Prior to mandatory prison terms, judges treated women as minors and just gave them probation sentences.



I remember the time. It was a standing joke that girls were in college to get their MRS degree. This was when the pill was still new. My fiancee went to a doctor to get a prescription for birth control, and he wouldn't give her one because she wasn't married. He felt it was his duty to act in loco parentis, because her father obviously wasn't doing his job.

It was like the spirit had been stomped out of all the young women. They avoided adventure and did what they were told. Housing at college was strictly segregated, and they had curfew on all the women's dorms, 10:30 on week nights and 1 AM on Friday and Saturday nights. Remember "Ladies Night" at the local taverns? Women could drink free, just to get them in the door.

Equal pay has been the law of the land since 1963. It's certainly the most ignored law in history.

The changing role of women has been the biggest single story of the last 50 years, but other than big events like bra burning or Roe v. Wade, it has mostly been a quiet revolution.
I agree. You can see all the changes in looking back to what it once was, but it happened more quietly and over time.

In seventh grade, girls in my town were allowed to start wearing pants to school. Before then, it had to be a skirt or dress. This was 1970. My sister's class, six years older, had staged a sit-in in the halls of the high school the previous year to campaign for girls being allowed to wear pants to school, and the next year they changed it for the district.
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Old 11-17-2013, 08:16 AM
 
Location: In the realm of possiblities
2,713 posts, read 2,441,377 times
Reputation: 3245
In my house it was the evolution of music that caused an uproar. My Mother took away my Woodstock album fearing I would become a " hippie". My step-father would yell at me to "turn down that noise!" while I slowly rebelled against authority. Truth be known, I wasn't much concerned in my early years about any current world events. I perceived unlimited horizons for my future. I was under the assumption the adults of the world would handle any problems that arose. After all, we had lost a president through assassination, and made it through that, so what problems could great minds not solve? My days revolved around school, the beach, girls, fast cars, swimming in my friends pond, and all the things that go hand in hand with a teenage boy's journey through adolescence. Today, looking back, my naivety during those years astounds me.

I remember, when I was younger, riding in a car with my Mother in Dallas, heading for my Grandma's house when the radio announcer solemnly announced that the President had been shot. Then as we had almost reached my Grandma's house in Garland, the announcer came on, again, and said the President had died. I remember wondering what would happen now that the United States had no leader?

I do remember Vietnam playing a role, later. If my parents were concerned, I don't remember it. Possibly they concealed their apprehension of the whole process for my sake. I, and some of my friends were unsure of what would happen with us if we were chosen to go. But, the war ended before we were chosen. It was a tumultuous time.
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