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Old 02-20-2015, 04:24 PM
 
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The South is full of Scotch-Irish descendents, most/all of whom are Protestant. The Irish Catholics largely went to northern cities such as Boston, NYC, Philly, Chicago, and numerous smaller ones, starting in the 1840s, and established their churches there..
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Old 02-20-2015, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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The protestent Ulster Scots were brought in to establish a predominantly protestant district in central Ireland, and were largely employed by English estates. The Scots didn't necessarily like the English, but they had closer ties than with the Irish who's jobs they took over.

Then later the Ulster estates changed their approach to making money, and no longer needed so many laborors. Those who refused to leave had their homes burned. The arrival in masse of Ulster Scots is timed to the changes in the estates.

I have a ggggrandfather who is also a gggrandfather who came about 1836. It's said he was an OrangeMan. But he left so hurridly that he neglected to bring his wife and two children along, and then remarried in New York.

My guess is he wouldn't have taken it well if you called him Irish.
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Old 02-20-2015, 07:20 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
From what I know they were mostly in Pennsylvania, Delaware area but then many of them moved down the Great Wagon Road into Tennessee, Virginia and other Southern states. They had around 15 Presidents of Ulster descent. The nearest one to being born in Ulster was Andrew Jackson. Excerpts from a few books.
Yes, Pennsylvania used to be where there was the biggest concentration of Scotch-Irish but now the state is full of Germans, Irish and Italians. It's like they all move south and west. Texas must be where there are the most numerous now.

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Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
The protestent Ulster Scots were brought in to establish a predominantly protestant district in central Ireland, and were largely employed by English estates. The Scots didn't necessarily like the English, but they had closer ties than with the Irish who's jobs they took over.
I find it interesting because a large number of Scotch-Irish were of northern English ancestry and didn't have Scottish blood. This little hatred between Scotland/northern England and southern England is still existing
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Old 02-21-2015, 05:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
The South is full of Scotch-Irish descendents, most/all of whom are Protestant. The Irish Catholics largely went to northern cities such as Boston, NYC, Philly, Chicago, and numerous smaller ones, starting in the 1840s, and established their churches there..

Aye, I'd say you are right.The exodus of the Ulster-Scots was mainly in the 1700s, though the Eagle Wing ship sailed from Groomsport in 1636. It turned back because of stormy weather.
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Old 02-21-2015, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Originally Posted by maus View Post
I will look up some of the books recommended in this thread, particularly Albion's Seed.

Not sure if this has been referenced on C-D anytime recently. This very-long BBC/PBS special called The Story of English from 1986 takes a look at Scottish-dialect influence on America from historical, cultural and linguistic perspectives.

The documentary covers the British Isles in the entire series. I've not watched the entire series, but Part 4 of 7 (The Story of English episode 4 - The Guid Scots Tongue) shows some examples of people who were living at the time in the U.S. with local dialects in the Appalachian mountains long influenced by the earlier Scots-Irish settlers' language from the colonial era.

The Story of English episode 4 - The Guid Scots Tongue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZNjxHyJAAk
This series is very well worth watching the whole thing. I used to have a copy on video tape I saved. There is one episode where they delve into what the average Englishman sounded like in Shakespeare's time. His works are frequently in some form of rhyme, and some of them just don't work with the current upper class brit's accent.

One of the recreated settlements in the Carolina's (I think) puts on plays as they would have when the colony was new. It's very close to a southern mountain twang. But interestingly when Shakespeare is read in this accent, there are rhymes and patterns which don't show up in the more refined speech. The 'proper' accent didn't actually develope until later.

You can see a lot of history of people in an exploration of how their language developes.
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Old 02-21-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Aye, I'd say you are right.The exodus of the Ulster-Scots was mainly in the 1700s, though the Eagle Wing ship sailed from Groomsport in 1636. It turned back because of stormy weather.
My gg grandfather/ggg grand father came from Ulster in 1835. It seems he was an Orangeman and proud of it. Suddenly he needed to get out of town fast so he did. Somewhere the descendents of his first wife and two children, whom he left without a word, may still live there. He married another immigrant from Ulster upon arrival. Judging from their pictures, I wouldn't argue with them I would really like to know what an Orangeman was besides someone who wasn't much into political and religious reconcilation.

The Ulster immigrants who came very early would more have congrigated in the same area. In the 1800's, they might arrive in New York and in a sea of immigrants and there wouldn't be as much reason to group together.

The other part of that family who arrived later were Scots from Scotland. All of them ended up in Iowa.
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Old 02-22-2015, 11:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
My gg grandfather/ggg grand father came from Ulster in 1835. It seems he was an Orangeman and proud of it. Suddenly he needed to get out of town fast so he did. Somewhere the descendents of his first wife and two children, whom he left without a word, may still live there. He married another immigrant from Ulster upon arrival. Judging from their pictures, I wouldn't argue with them I would really like to know what an Orangeman was besides someone who wasn't much into political and religious reconcilation.

The Ulster immigrants who came very early would more have congrigated in the same area. In the 1800's, they might arrive in New York and in a sea of immigrants and there wouldn't be as much reason to group together.

The other part of that family who arrived later were Scots from Scotland. All of them ended up in Iowa.

There were five ships from Ulster which sailed into Charleston. Most of those arriving were headed by a minister and his congregation. McGregore was a minister who with his congregation arrived further north, at Delaware I think. As already mentioned the Eagles Wing was a ship which sailed from Groomsport in the early 1600s. It too was led by the minister of their church.

One commentator said that there arrived among them, these whisky drinking,Bible thumping, gun-totting people. So they wern't all church people
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Old 02-23-2015, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
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Originally Posted by Ulsterman View Post
Will have to get there dizzybint. Keep meaning to, but always something comes up. I have been to the Ulster American Folk Park which is a great place to visit.
never got to vist the Folk Park sadly as we were trying to cram in as much as possible traveling all across NI ..
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Old 02-23-2015, 01:32 PM
 
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Thanks for the links Tenn 82. This is a blogspot I came across.

Ulster Connections
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