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Old 01-28-2008, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Drury Lane
823 posts, read 2,621,342 times
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Anyone care to estimate the lengths these expeditions traveled? TIA

Diaz's voyage to the Cape of Good Hope

Columbus's journeys to what he thought were the Spice Islands

Drake's circumnavigation

Balboa's voyage to Caribbean

De Gama's voyage to India

Pizarro's voyage from Isthmus of Panama to
wherever he landed in South America. Didn't he sail with Balboa from Spain?

Cortez's voyage to Mexico...included significant overland travel.

Magellan's circumnavigation... I understand to be 60,000 miles. If incorrect, please speak up.
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Old 01-29-2008, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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I know that Christopher (which way to New Delhi?) Columbus' flagship, the Santa Maria made a one-way trip, as he wrecked it near Haiti on the way back. Uh oh, Queen Isabella is going to be mad!
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Old 01-29-2008, 04:51 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Way too much work.

Ken
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Old 01-29-2008, 04:55 PM
 
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What always amazed me was how they carried enough water for these journeys. I know when they had a chance they replenished at shore but sometimes when they sailed in unchartered waters they weren't certain where fresh water was.

As someone who was in the Navy i admire those early sailors and the hardships they went thru.
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Old 01-29-2008, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Chemnitz, Germany previous in AZ, CA, AL, NJ,
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I'm sure that's why they would carry so many wooden barrels and pray for rain. Whenever it would rain out at sea they could capture water dropping down some sails and using them as water collectors and funnel the rain into the barrels.

Regardless of how history has judged many of these early oceanic explorers, nobody can argue about the incredible courage they had. Imagine sailing in a relatively small wooden ship of that era out into the ocean and over the horizon, with no real idea of where you were heading to, what would be there when you arrive, how far you were going, how long it would take or if you would survive and return home!
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Old 01-29-2008, 10:32 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
20,460 posts, read 24,066,021 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recycled View Post
Regardless of how history has judged many of these early oceanic explorers, nobody can argue about the incredible courage they had. Imagine sailing in a relatively small wooden ship of that era out into the ocean and over the horizon, with no real idea of where you were heading to, what would be there when you arrive, how far you were going, how long it would take or if you would survive and return home!
Yeah, and think of those early Polynesians who sailed across the largest body of water on earth (with even more primative equipment) and settled on the most remote (ie most distant from a large land mass) islands on earth - a little cluster of islands they called Havaiki (after their legendary homeland) - which we now know of course as Hawaii.

Brave folks, every one.

Ken
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Old 01-29-2008, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Austin TX
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Don't forget the Vikings, small open boats and a lot of lousy weather in the North Atlantic. They were amazing!
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Old 01-31-2008, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
10,031 posts, read 9,406,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
What always amazed me was how they carried enough water for these journeys. I know when they had a chance they replenished at shore but sometimes when they sailed in unchartered waters they weren't certain where fresh water was.

As someone who was in the Navy i admire those early sailors and the hardships they went thru.
Yep wooden ships and iron men!!!!! Now days it's the other day around


P.S. I was a sailor so don't bust on me it's a joke!!!!!
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