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Old 02-28-2016, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Finally escaped The People's Republic of California
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The Allies and the Nazi's for the most part followed the Geneva Convention and its banning of Chemical Weapons, The Japanese used them in China, but not against allied forces probably because they knew retaliation would be swift.....
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Old 02-28-2016, 03:15 PM
 
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[quote=TheWiseWino;43180612]
Quote:
Originally Posted by serabal View Post

Hey, learn to format, the horses quote wasn't mine!
Hey and that wasn't my quote, as the above isn't Serabal's quote....but we can all go back and see what is what. CityData doesn't work right sometimes. It's all cool.

To answer your original question Serabel, I have no answer except to from reading history of WW2 the allies, particularly after US engaged, had a preponderance of artillery compared to Germany. That doesn't explain the "horse" issue (once again I think that was Goering's explaination) entirely, nor does it explain why they didn't use it on the eastern front.
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Old 02-28-2016, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Elysium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Felix C View Post
There must have been a perceived German threat for the Allies to stockpile mustard gas at Bari in 1943. Well they tried as the shipment was bombed and spread among the harbor/wharf/etc.

Regarding the PTO, I suspect island campaigns were drive by speed hence the typical use of Marines rather than Army. I know, I know there are exceptions and recall a U.S. Army general was relieved because his troops progress was too slow. The use of chemical weapons on the small islands may have lead to an undesired wait for its effects to be confirmed and then there is the soil and perhaps water contamination issue. Of course, there is also Japanese retribution on Allied POWs.
US Marines were typically used because they were controlled by the Navy Department so Army troops were used in the Southwest Pacific and China Burma India theatre and Marines very rarely went to those islands in large numbers.

The Battle of Saipan where US Army Major General Ralph Smith was relieved of command of the US 27th Infantry Division by USMC Lieutenant General Holland Smith commanding the V Amphibious Corp (made up of 4 Marine Divisions and attachments and 3 US Army Divisions and a Corp level Artillery command). The Army always maintained the official position that General Ralph Smith didn't deserve what General "Howlin Mad" Smith did to him
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Old 02-28-2016, 05:34 PM
 
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[quote=Dd714;43180804]
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWiseWino View Post

Hey and that wasn't my quote, as the above isn't Serabal's quote....but we can all go back and see what is what. CityData doesn't work right sometimes. It's all cool.
Most Def!
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Old 02-28-2016, 06:49 PM
 
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The U.S. stockpiled chemical weapons near the front lines for retaliatory use against the Germans. One of the ships carrying the weapons was hit during an air raid in the port of Bari. Though the resulting fatalities were quickly hushed up, scores of people were killed by mustard gas.
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Old 02-28-2016, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Maryland about 20 miles NW of DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWiseWino View Post
Perhaps somewhere somebody used chemical weapons to but to my knowledge no one did. How was that possible? How is it that even the Nazis in their darkest hour didn't resort to chemical weapons during the war, and what was the rational for the U.S. not to using chemical weapons but still being able to justify using the atomic bomb. What was the disconnect because I just find it incredible that considering all the other crimes committed during the war how chemical weapons didn't come into play.


(of course some will quickly disprove my understand and kill the thread :roll eyes: )



The use of Chemical Weapons in the Second World war would have been horrendous when compared to WW1. By 1939 new much more toxic neuro-toxins had been discovered and weaponized. The Germans had discovered the G-class agents (Tabun, Sarin and Soman ( Agents GA, GB and GC)). and the British had found the first even more toxic binary agent VX. America got the rights to produce the G agents from IG Farben before the war when DuPont traded the rights to produce synthetic rubber and Nylon to IG Farben . Britain shared the knowledge required to make and use VX with America in the deal that also brought such goodies as the Merlin Engine, Frank Whittles jet engine, the M.A.U.D Report (How to build an atomic bomb), the secret of Enigma ,from the Royal Signals Establishment at Malverne) (The Cavity Magnetron) centimeteric radar and radars small enough to put on ships, and planes. America built a large store of chemical shells and bombs and stored them at Edgewood MD, Aniston AL, Tooele-Dugway UT and Umatilla, OR. These weapons remained in our arsenal until the 1990s when a deal was worked out to destroy these weapons in the hands of the major powers (USA, Britain, France, the USSR and China. )


Apart from memories from the trenches of the Western Front a genuine balance of terror existed in regards to Chemical weapons and also biological weapons between the Axis and Allies. So the use of these weapons was deterred even when one side faced defeat.
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Old 02-29-2016, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiko View Post
US Marines were typically used because they were controlled by the Navy Department so Army troops were used in the Southwest Pacific and China Burma India theatre and Marines very rarely went to those islands in large numbers.

The Battle of Saipan where US Army Major General Ralph Smith was relieved of command of the US 27th Infantry Division by USMC Lieutenant General Holland Smith commanding the V Amphibious Corp (made up of 4 Marine Divisions and attachments and 3 US Army Divisions and a Corp level Artillery command). The Army always maintained the official position that General Ralph Smith didn't deserve what General "Howlin Mad" Smith did to him
True but the main point USMC doctrine was oriented to rapid assault and less focus on casualty reduction compared to the U.S. Army.
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Old 02-29-2016, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Falls Church, Fairfax County
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The Germans would have been at a disadvantage if they started using them against the Western Allies do to the way the prevailing winds flow.

Many consider white phosphorous, which the Americans used (and use?), a chemical weapon.
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Old 02-29-2016, 06:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryptic View Post
The U.S. stockpiled chemical weapons near the front lines for retaliatory use against the Germans. One of the ships carrying the weapons was hit during an air raid in the port of Bari. Though the resulting fatalities were quickly hushed up, scores of people were killed by mustard gas.
This is the only comment in this thread that I can easily believe.

After WW2, the military had the problem of dealing with the disposal of HUGE quantities of chemical weapons, and for the most part, many of these old munitions were dumped in the Chesapeake Bay.

That tells me that the US had chemical weapons, but I don't know if any were purposefully used or not.

During WW1, the United States produced chemical weapons at a shell-loading facility called "Penniman" (six miles from Colonial Williamsburg). When the war ended, those weapons were shipped to Aberdeen.

This is a great book, which tells more about the military's role in dumping chemical weapons into the Chesapeake Bay: http://www.amazon.com/Death-Chesapea.../dp/B00D42UIW6
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Old 02-29-2016, 08:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RosemaryT View Post
After WW2, the military had the problem of dealing with the disposal of HUGE quantities of chemical weapons, and for the most part, many of these old munitions were dumped in the Chesapeake Bay.

That tells me that the US had chemical weapons, but I don't know if any were purposefully used or not.
I dont think any chemcial weapons were purposely used either.

As a side note, not only did the US have the stockpiles, but they also had specically trained mortar platoons for chemical warfare. These mortar platoons were called "Chemial / Smoke" mortar platoons and I think every US infantry regiment had one.

Though trained for chemical weapons, the specialized platoons were used to fire smoke shells , white phosphorous shells (nasty weapon, but legal) and probably alot of ordinary mortar shells as well.
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