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Old 02-25-2008, 08:55 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,966,653 times
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I have to admit i'm aloof when it comes to this subject but how did they mint coins back in historical times? You'll see ancient Roman Coins of the Emperor or coins of the early Anglo Saxon kings of England and all the other countries thru out the ages etc....

I supposed they are Iron or Bronze??? How did they cut then out to be circular and how did they ''Stamp'' the image on them??

Anyway i think you get what i'm asking but i'm curious about this so if someone has studied about Ancient Coin making i'd like to know.

Here's an example of some coins of Julius Ceasar 49 BC-44 BC if you want to look at them.
Julius Caesar
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Old 02-25-2008, 01:07 PM
 
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I have no idea All I can find on the net is that they were minted way way back BCE...Will keep looking .interesting question!
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Old 02-28-2008, 07:27 PM
 
Location: The Pacific NorthWET
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Default Minting in the Roman era

Here is a very short description of Roman-era coinmaking.

Minting in Greek and Roman times was a tedious process of hand striking a heated metal blank between two dies. The ancient Greeks hammered simple designs into round-ish blobs of heated metal.

In Roman times, coining metal was hammered into narrow strips from which roughly round blanks were cut. The blanks were hammered on the edge to make them more smoothly round. A die maker would have cut a reverse image into a steel die, one die for each side. The blanks would be heated in a small furnace to soften them, and, one at a time, a hot blank would be set on the lower die with tongs. The upper die would be set on top of the blank and struck with a hammer.

The variability in the results of this technique is evident in the ancient coins we find today. Blanks that were not heated sufficiently often have a split on the edge because the metal did not flow properly. Because the upper die was held in the strikers hand, it was difficult to perfectly center the image.

The technology for striking coins did not advance significantly until the Middle Ages with the invention of the drop hammer coin press. Large screw presses came into use by US Colonial times, and steam-powered mechanical presses became common by the 19th century.

Today, high-speed coining presses can spit out coins as fast as a machine gun fires bullets.

Of the nearly 200 countries in the world today, I have heard that fewer than 60 have their own government-owned mints. The rest contract the service out to private mints and other government mints.

That may be more than you wanted to know, but I hope it was helpful. Do a Google search for "ancient coin making" for other websites with lots more information.

Best regards,

Rob [Mod Cut]

Last edited by ontheroad; 02-29-2008 at 06:42 PM.. Reason: Sorry, signatures of this sort are against CD ToS.
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Old 02-28-2008, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Vermont / NEK
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Great post and great information. Hope you stick around RobV.
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Old 02-29-2008, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,875,226 times
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World's First Coin - Lydian Trite - Alyattes (http://rg.ancients.info/lion/article.html - broken link)
History of the Greek coins
History of MONEY
http://www.frenchcoins.net/links/technolo.pdf
http://www.projects.ex.ac.uk/RDavies/arian/amser/chrono1.htmlhttp://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/hampshire/dorset/3156829.stm (broken link)
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Old 02-29-2008, 06:35 AM
 
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Thanks RobV and Moosketeer....as i see they basically superheated the metal then hammered them on the Die(s) that had the image that was imprinted on the Coin.

6/3
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Old 02-29-2008, 07:38 AM
 
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Rob V...Thanks for the great info...So many items we never think about..they are just 'there'! I like to watch "How It's Made" I think it's on History or Discovery...
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Old 02-29-2008, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,194 posts, read 25,583,201 times
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I know virtually nothing about the minting of coins, but I do know I saw some of the oldest coins (I'd seen) in Sicily. I did a google and found this site which you might find intriguing.

Some of the coins I saw were so thin they were like paper, and others were mottled and unreadable. But all of them were fascinating.

Of the half dozen or more museums I saw in Sicily, 90% were devoted to archaeological site recovery. Here's a fun group of videos of sites visited (in Italian).
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