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Old 11-03-2019, 03:04 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
5,883 posts, read 2,268,025 times
Reputation: 10641

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Born in 1938, mine was the generation that got sick of social injustice and endless wars and protested to do something about, at Selma and Kent State.
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Old 11-03-2019, 08:25 AM
 
7,394 posts, read 4,069,949 times
Reputation: 19684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frihed89 View Post
I was born in 1943, a pre-boomer, boomer. Thanks, in no small part to the industrial development required to win WW2, we boomers and our parents reaped the post-war harvest. But what many of us have never understood, or appreciated, were the human sacrifices required by our parents' generation to put our industrial might to use on the battlefield. I had 5 uncles. 4 of them fought in WW2 - all in the Pacific. The one who didn't fight was judged to be medically unfit. The sad and telling thing about their contribution is that they were reluctant to talk about their experiences and I was too obsessed with reaping the economic benefits of their service that I never asked.

All this dawned on me only in the last 10-15 years, after I became an ardent reader of books about WW2 (mostly about the Pacific War), and found out about the dangers my father and uncles faced in the US Navy, but barely talked about, in places like Guadalcanal, Saipan and Okinawa.

I don't know what else to say, except that we didn't do it on our own, as many boomers still think.
I can relate heavily to this one. My wife and I are both Gen-x but I came along very late in my parent's lives because they were both Greatest Gen. Like yours, Dad and my uncles all fought in the Pacific. And Mom worked in a shipyard. As I kid I loved their stories of basic and the war. Except I could never understand why their stories always ended when they got to Hawaii. There was nothing west of Pearl Harbor. It was only much later, as an adult in the service myself did I understand why they never talked about anything that happened once they left Pearl.

My wife's parents however were boomers (I'm several years older than her) so I was able to see the contrast first hand between the two generations. Your last sentence really says it all. My wife's parents always considered everything they got was by their own doing and never understood the gift they were given by their parents. I remember one time my FIL was lecturing us about money and how "growing up during the depression …." and I was thinking "how can you claim anything about growing up in the depression. You weren't even BORN." Her parents simply didn't understand either the Greatest Gen, nor did they understand the world their grandchildren (Gen Z) grew up in.
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Old 11-03-2019, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Texas
36,611 posts, read 20,212,577 times
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Boomer here.

Retirement is good.

I just can't relate to those who "need something to do" and are miserable after leaving work. Spent 48 years working and now 5 retired.
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Old 11-03-2019, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,371 posts, read 4,993,222 times
Reputation: 5880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Gringo View Post
Boomer here.

Retirement is good.

I just can't relate to those who "need something to do" and are miserable after leaving work. Spent 48 years working and now 5 retired.
I think it's the curse of being highly social. Many social types love having a job where they interact with people all day.

Not me. I always recommend taking up a new hobby. Try something you think you won't enjoy and see how it turns out.

You're never too old to play video games, there was an absolute legend of a woman who was in her 80's and was a huge DragonQuest fan. She, in fact, had a lot to do with the English localization of DragonQuest VI for the Nintendo DS. Sadly, she has since passed away; but we all remember her in the community very fondly.
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Old 11-03-2019, 10:34 AM
 
1,730 posts, read 1,077,372 times
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My opinion, only good thing about Generation X is/was the music..

But in defense of X, it was a generation raised & shaped by the chronically divorced, free-loving & unprecedented casual drug-using, virtue-signalling, self-absorbed Boomers..

I've always wondered what the WW2 greatest generation did to produce very screwed up, rebellious kids (Boomers & hippies) (?) It seems to be a blind spot in the celebration of the greatest generation.. I guess Vietnam conscription was a big part of the Boomers' rebellion, but..
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Old 11-03-2019, 10:40 AM
 
Location: San Diego CA
5,647 posts, read 3,726,673 times
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I missed being a Boomer by one year and would be in the so called Silent Generation if you believe in arbitrary classifications. What amazing changes. The world never stands still for a single moment. Full of surprises, disappointments, achievements and memories.
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Old 11-03-2019, 11:00 AM
 
Location: New York
31 posts, read 3,198 times
Reputation: 15
Technically, I'm a Gen Zer because I was born in 1999 according to the chart that OP posted. However if you ask me, I'm more so of a very late Y/early Z kind of person given the experiences that I had in my life.
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Old 11-03-2019, 11:04 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
6,112 posts, read 2,710,710 times
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I am the Gen-X daughter of two Silents. Married to a conservative Boomer. My six oldest kids are Millennial's & my five younger kids are Gen-Z's.

Agree to the cold-war influence; 100%.

In the course of my lifetime I have re-evolved several times over. When I was just coming of age, I think a lot of us Gen-Xers were confused by the aftermath of the social-revolution the Boomers had embraced & were largely the catalyst for.

We were the latchkey kids. We were not typically born into single-parent households but experienced broken homes. Moms who wanted to leave us to go 'find themselves'. I was luckier than a lot of my friends; as my parents were more akin to the Greatest gen than other Silents were but make no mistake; that IS what caused so many Gen-Xers to go 'grunge' & become lost.

The social de-evolution did us no favors.

I started off as an ultra-liberal & am now a conservative republican & I have the Boomers to thank for that. I do not feel thankful for what feminism did to my male Gen-X counterparts, nor to what it has done to the male Millennial's & Gen-Z's. Which is why my spouse is a conservative Boomer & I had to choose him with my head, not necessarily my heart; because the propaganda was so pervasive that I literally cannot trust my heart regarding men my own age.

I LOVE Millennial's & Gen-Z's. You guys rock. And I like Boomer's too, btw; it wasn't your fault; the propaganda was by design & American propaganda is the envy of other governments worldwide. I admire greatly the Silent's & of course the Greatest's.
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Old 11-03-2019, 11:15 AM
 
7,394 posts, read 4,069,949 times
Reputation: 19684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Babe_Ruth View Post
My opinion, only good thing about Generation X is/was the music..

But in defense of X, it was a generation raised & shaped by the chronically divorced, free-loving & unprecedented casual drug-using, virtue-signalling, self-absorbed Boomers..

I've always wondered what the WW2 greatest generation did to produce very screwed up, rebellious kids (Boomers & hippies) (?) It seems to be a blind spot in the celebration of the greatest generation.. I guess Vietnam conscription was a big part of the Boomers' rebellion, but..
My dad's answer to that question (he was a member of the Greatest Gen) is his generation had seen and suffered so much (depression, dust bowl, WW2, etc) that they wanted their kids to have and do everything they didn't. Basically spoiled an entire generation was his point of view.

I also think they set the dates for the boom generation a few years off. Should start it about 1940 and end it with the space age. My observation is the "silent generation" is essentially culturally like early boomers and late boomers are more culturally like Gen X.
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Old 11-03-2019, 06:08 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL
4,476 posts, read 3,737,235 times
Reputation: 3601
Dates seem a little off. Usually Millennial start year seems to be around 1982 and ends more in the late 90s or even 2000 instead of 94/95.

I was born in 92. Sister in 86. We're both right in the meat of Millennials. Though even we have some differences. Social media didn't really start til my sister was already in college. There was still some networking through AIM, but not as widespread as Myspace and especially Facebook which was starting to get big right as I got to high school. Smartphones also weren't really around for my sister til the end of her college years whereas they appeared during my HS time and really became prevalent for my college years. Having mobile access to the internet really help during college. First time off on my own, in an entirely different state, it was great having instant access to information without having to head for the nearest computer lab. Web streaming was also taking off. When my sister went to college, my parents bought her a desktop computer with the big CRT monitor and all that. 5+ years later, I already had my own laptop that I was able to take that was cheaper and more powerful.
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