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Old 01-14-2020, 11:54 AM
 
Location: NYC
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I actually care about history perhaps thousands of years ago because a lot of the knowledge known in the past were lost and just being rediscovered now. There are still lots of ancient history that are being discovered today due to new tech that opens up a lot of questions than answers.
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Old 01-14-2020, 07:54 PM
 
Location: 2 blocks from bay in L.I, NY
1,941 posts, read 1,560,512 times
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Originally Posted by gmagoo View Post
I`ve been asked why I read so many WW1 books and indeed it`s because I find it interesting. It`s surprising how little Americans know about that war. Very few of us can name more than 4 or 5 countries that were participants.
I was never into war as a subject but a few months ago, out of boredom I watched a documentary on WWI. It totally educated me in a way that I'd never been exposed to before. A coincidence was that a few months prior, I'd taken my first ever trip to Austria and Hungary and visited the former Hapsburg's palaces among other places of interest.

If you're into movies and documentaries on WWI, have you seen or plan to go to see the movie 1917? I saw the trailer and I'm wondering what do historians and those very knowledgeable about the war think of the movie?
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Old 01-14-2020, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Texas
44,220 posts, read 54,577,950 times
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A really fun way to learn about history is to read historical fiction novels.

While not necessarily 100% correct on all the details sometimes, it motivates me to look up more stuff about it, etc.

Some fun novels include Pillars of the Earth, The Alienist, A WHOLE BUNCH of WWI and WWII novels, GWTW, the Dane Maddock series, blah blah blah...I could go on forever there are so freakin' many of every part of history.
I just read this great series by Daniel Kalla about the jews in WWII Shangai.
Oh, and this detective series set in Sri Lanka during the British occupation (Nuala).
Just so many things!
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Old 01-14-2020, 09:05 PM
 
6,193 posts, read 3,348,909 times
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Originally Posted by axelthefox View Post
Because Seems some don't know about much of the history or such from that time. I once put a song on the radio that was in old english and for some reason a person thought they were singing in romanian or such. I wonder why some people seem ignorant to something that happened 1000 years ago.

I agree but I find it far less concerning about people's knowledge of history than I do their understanding of the "current". The rise of fake news or misrepresentation of our current world events is highly problematic. Just watch FNC and CNBC and you'll see completely different reporting of the facts which is highlighted by both of them getting it wrong.
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Old 01-14-2020, 10:05 PM
 
1,170 posts, read 424,080 times
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Originally Posted by twinkletwinkle22 View Post
I love history but even when in school I thought "How can we ever keep up with learning history, there's so much of it and more made every year." A lot of history must be condensed and taught superficially unless specializing on the college level.

I learned a little Middle English in high school Honors English while we studied Chaucer, where has it gotten me?
Do I regret learning it? Never. Plus there were some pretty saucy tales.
I own a book called "Life in the Middle Ages" just because.
History is interesting but the way it must be taught in school is anything but.
One of the biggest and best things I learned in school was about the Great Schism, splitting from the Pope. I thought that was fascinating. If I learned anythng, I remember that. Everything else was mundane, except for the Civil War of the U.S., and briefly WWI and II. Yes, I found the assassination of whoever it was that started WWI fascinating and horrifying. We only touched on the periphery, not much insight, but I remember paying attention during those discussions. Later on in life I began learning more, but who has time?? I'm now trying to read a biography of Einstein, in between everything else I have to do (including these messages). Of course it's been some time since I went to school. :-) While history about certain things is interesting, we here in the U.S. learn mostly about American/English history. Not much about oriental countries, northern Europe, eastern Europe, maybe a few things about Russia. Maybe.
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Old 01-14-2020, 10:07 PM
 
1,170 posts, read 424,080 times
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Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
I agree but I find it far less concerning about people's knowledge of history than I do their understanding of the "current". The rise of fake news or misrepresentation of our current world events is highly problematic. Just watch FNC and CNBC and you'll see completely different reporting of the facts which is highlighted by both of them getting it wrong.
When I see the headlines, hear the reports, and read the articles after the headlines, I think: what?? hmmm?? and (huh?)
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Old 01-15-2020, 03:16 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
4,279 posts, read 1,939,161 times
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Originally Posted by axelthefox View Post
Because Seems some don't know about much of the history or such from that time. I once put a song on the radio that was in old english and for some reason a person thought they were singing in romanian or such. I wonder why some people seem ignorant to something that happened 1000 years ago.

I think it was harder then to record. Such a smooth ride in autos today compared to riding on a Brontosaurus then. But Americans really should step up their understanding of history.
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Old 01-15-2020, 08:19 AM
 
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Only thing my school taught was pilgrim to 1812, every year, over and over. I did not learn anything about civil war till the history channel started.
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Old 01-15-2020, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Elysium
7,185 posts, read 4,037,856 times
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Originally Posted by brownbagg View Post
Only thing my school taught was pilgrim to 1812, every year, over and over. I did not learn anything about civil war till the history channel started.
Same here in the 1970s except for a look a Greek mythology it was the most basic concepts of how the republic and democracy developed. If I wanted to learn more it was probably a movie which sparked me to read something about a subject
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Old 01-15-2020, 08:34 AM
 
8,792 posts, read 2,166,963 times
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Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
A really fun way to learn about history is to read historical fiction novels.

While not necessarily 100% correct on all the details sometimes, it motivates me to look up more stuff about it, etc.

Some fun novels include Pillars of the Earth, The Alienist, A WHOLE BUNCH of WWI and WWII novels, GWTW, the Dane Maddock series, blah blah blah...I could go on forever there are so freakin' many of every part of history.
I just read this great series by Daniel Kalla about the jews in WWII Shangai.
Oh, and this detective series set in Sri Lanka during the British occupation (Nuala).
Just so many things!
You beat me to it. I like history, but I admit that I am very ignorant about most of it and what prompts me to learn more are well-done movies (especially mini-series) and interesting books. The only thing about fiction, however, is that it so often distorts or outright lies about the truth -- but, again, at least they do prompt me to learn. Like you, one of my favorite novels and mini-series is The Pillars of the Earth. (If anyone had told me that I would ever enjoy a book about medieval cathedral building, I would have thought them insane.)

Other mini-series set before 1500 A.D. that I have enjoyed include Cadfael and The White Queen series; and I have enjoyed literally dozens of more modern historical novels and series.
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