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Old 01-12-2020, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Kapolei,Hawai'i
122 posts, read 66,359 times
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Because Seems some don't know about much of the history or such from that time. I once put a song on the radio that was in old english and for some reason a person thought they were singing in romanian or such. I wonder why some people seem ignorant to something that happened 1000 years ago.
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Old 01-13-2020, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Roaring '20s
1,999 posts, read 536,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axelthefox View Post
Because Seems some don't know about much of the history or such from that time. I once put a song on the radio that was in old english and for some reason a person thought they were singing in romanian or such. I wonder why some people seem ignorant to something that happened 1000 years ago.
Because it's simply not relevant.

Now, I happen to have an interest in history and I know a fair amount of English history. I probably know more about the reigns of Richard the Lionheart and John Lackland - both no more than 800 years in the past - than I do the presidencies of Martin Van Buren and Rutherford B. Hayes. And I'm an American, so the latter would be far more relevant to me (but still, let's be honest - no American really needs to know anything about either of those presidents).

A couple of weeks ago, I happened to hear German spoken on the street of my upper Midwestern town by a group of teenage boys obviously being chaperoned by an adult woman. This was unusual. Passing by them a few minutes later, I realized that the language was not German, though it still sounded vaguely Germanic to me. I knew it wasn't Dutch or any of the Scandinavian languages, either. Frisian, I thought? I soon find out that they were a Finnish youth hockey team speaking, obviously, Finnish - not only not a Germanic language but not an Indo-European language. As with history, I have an interest in language and in particular historical linguistics. But I've never heard Old English spoken (because it's a dead language) and I can certainly imagine how it could be mistaken for Romanian - the most divergent of the Romance languages because it's physically separated by the rest, and because it is heavily influenced by Slavic tongues - especially by someone assuming that the language they're hearing is a modern one, and not some guess (albeit an educated one) at the phonology of a long-dead language).

Let's not fool ourselves. Few of us are interested in history because of some need to know historical facts. We study it because it interests us. And it doesn't interest some people.
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:14 AM
 
8,257 posts, read 4,088,821 times
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I`ve been asked why I read so many WW1 books and indeed it`s because I find it interesting. It`s surprising how little Americans know about that war. Very few of us can name more than 4 or 5 countries that were participants.
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Old 01-13-2020, 09:40 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
7,200 posts, read 11,122,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axelthefox View Post
Because Seems some don't know about much of the history or such from that time. I once put a song on the radio that was in old english and for some reason a person thought they were singing in romanian or such. I wonder why some people seem ignorant to something that happened 1000 years ago.
Oh, c'mon, beyond basic grade school history, history in any depth is for specialists, including both academics and independent scholars.

Look, in a few hundred years from now no one except for specialists will know when, where, who, how or why the Industrial Revolution started. In fact, even today I'm sure a good chunk of the population does not know.

Does anyone really know when, where, who, how and why the Agricultural Revolution started, some say around 10,000 years ago? And even professional academics and independent scholars will argue inanely with each other until blue in the face.

Some folks can't even tell you what their grandparents did in their lives.
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Old 01-13-2020, 05:02 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
15,229 posts, read 9,401,360 times
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People interested in history should read "Sarum", which is the story of England from 10,000 years ago.
Or read "Pillars of The Earth"l, set in Europe, in the 12th century.
They are bother well researched fiction revolving around events that are well documented. It's a wonderful way to learn history from a layman's point of view.
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Old 01-13-2020, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
4,300 posts, read 2,533,371 times
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What little most people know about general history comes from school, and schools focus more on antiquity/ancient history. Meaning Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome. And then they skip over to the colonial period. If the teacher is very good at keeping the class on track they will be able to squeeze in the Middle Ages, but usually not as they have to try and at least mention China, India and meso America.
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Old 01-13-2020, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Texas
44,220 posts, read 54,577,950 times
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Most folks don't know much more than what they need to know to get by and what interests them.

EVERYTHING interests me, but most people focus on a couple things.
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Old 01-13-2020, 11:24 PM
 
777 posts, read 315,951 times
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I love history but even when in school I thought "How can we ever keep up with learning history, there's so much of it and more made every year." A lot of history must be condensed and taught superficially unless specializing on the college level.

I learned a little Middle English in high school Honors English while we studied Chaucer, where has it gotten me?
Do I regret learning it? Never. Plus there were some pretty saucy tales.
I own a book called "Life in the Middle Ages" just because.
History is interesting but the way it must be taught in school is anything but.
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Old 01-14-2020, 12:03 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
8,030 posts, read 4,349,807 times
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Most people do not personally know history beyond two or three generations. That is about 50 years. I was born exactly 50 years after the Spanish American War but that event was eclipsed by two world wars, the Great Depression, the dust bowl, prohibition, Korea, Vietnam, womens' sufferage, Civil Rights, Nixon, powered flight, moon landings, 9/11, Afghanistan, Iraq, and now climate change. Fifty years back from today is 1970, post-Woodstock.

History is too often short changed in school. It takes a serious effort to "know" history and much more to understand it. We sometimes think of history like a bunch of post-it notes on a timeline but it is all connected.
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Old 01-14-2020, 02:00 AM
 
16,122 posts, read 14,425,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axelthefox View Post
Because Seems some don't know about much of the history or such from that time. I once put a song on the radio that was in old english and for some reason a person thought they were singing in romanian or such. I wonder why some people seem ignorant to something that happened 1000 years ago. [COLOR=gray]
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Because such things are not taught in schools for general education.
And if the system of education does not think it's important, why would people read about it on their own?

So unless it's part of their curriculum later on, during University's years, they lack the knowledge.
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