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Old Yesterday, 01:38 PM
 
Location: VA, IL, FL, SD, TN, NC, SC
883 posts, read 231,844 times
Reputation: 1777

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Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Some people have pointed out positive things Jackson did before he became President. I'm focused on his actual presidency. So far, the only positive thing I've really seen pointed out is that he stood up to secessionists in South Carolina over the Tariff of Abominations. If there are other accomplishments I'm ignoring than please clue me in.
I'll give you one, as it reflects again on his complexity. Jackson's opposition to the Second Bank of the United States(He used executive power to remove federal funds from the bank) stemmed from his observation that the bank's Board Of Directors was stacked with those involved in manufacturing interests and they tended to only provided financing to the industrial base, ignoring the south and most importantly the rapidly expanding west(see comment one, below).

What Jackson essentially observed was the bank system was politicized to pick winners and losers. His observation was essentially accurate and this same observation and issue continues to this day in various forms. Jackson identified a problem that would continue to plaque this nation in every decade, consider, for example books like Ron Paul'sEnd the Fed or G, Edward Griffin's classic The Creature from Jekyll Island. They indicate a variant of the same problem Jackson identified back in the early 1830s.

Cheers,

The ghostly one

Comment 01:

If you think of this, this amounts to and extension of the Jeffersonian yeoman farmer ideal. And when you look at the settlement of the west, you can clearly see how the lack of funding played out; it cost s whole lot of innocent lives to develop the frontier one farm and out post at a time. As a nation we never experienced the Jefferson ideal, industry and the merchant class took over (Hamilton won), but the issues as result, persist. Take a look at the current crop of Democratic candidates. Had a Jeffersonian democracy emerged they likely would be complacent. Instead they are foaming at the mouth to tear down the pillars of capitalism. With the bank, this is what I think Jackson saw. His actions lend credence to that viewpoint. I always wonder what this nation would have been had we headed the bounds of the Constitution.

Last edited by GhostOfAndrewJackson; Yesterday at 01:49 PM..
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Old Today, 05:51 AM
 
Location: New York Area
18,145 posts, read 7,119,563 times
Reputation: 13892
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostOfAndrewJackson View Post
I'll give you one, as it reflects again on his complexity. Jackson's opposition to the Second Bank of the United States(He used executive power to remove federal funds from the bank) stemmed from his observation that the bank's Board Of Directors was stacked with those involved in manufacturing interests and they tended to only provided financing to the industrial base, ignoring the south and most importantly the rapidly expanding west(see comment one, below).

What Jackson essentially observed was the bank system was politicized to pick winners and losers. His observation was essentially accurate and this same observation and issue continues to this day in various forms. Jackson identified a problem that would continue to plaque this nation in every decade, consider, for example books like Ron Paul'sEnd the Fed or G, Edward Griffin's classic The Creature from Jekyll Island. They indicate a variant of the same problem Jackson identified back in the early 1830s.
Agreed. The Federal Reserve is basically what a reformed Bank of the United States would have looked like. Circa 1828 that wasn't happening.
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