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Old 04-27-2022, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
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OP must never have been to Boston. I would guess 75% of whites in the area are ethnic: Irish, Italian, Armenian, Turks, Portuguese, Eastern European, etc. British ancestry is not the default by any stretch.
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Old 04-28-2022, 02:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit33 View Post
OP must never have been to Boston. I would guess 75% of whites in the area are ethnic: Irish, Italian, Armenian, Turks, Portuguese, Eastern European, etc. British ancestry is not the default by any stretch.
In the 1800s Boston was predominantly of British ancestry, mainly Irish. The Irish of the time were gregarious - still are to a lesser extent. They rarely ventured from their own enclaves.
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Old 04-28-2022, 03:49 AM
 
Location: A blue island in the Piedmont
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
Why did immigrants end up going to New York instead of Boston?
The railroad connections that sent most immigrants (90%?) on a 1000 mile journey west from the coast.
Rather few of the immigrants stayed at whichever port city they started in.

In Baltimore... The B&O Railroad and the LLoyd Bremen Line had a partnership.
Their ships unloaded within FEET of the rail siding.

Last edited by MrRational; 04-28-2022 at 03:58 AM..
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Old 04-28-2022, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
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Originally Posted by Dave Davis View Post
In the 1800s Boston was predominantly of British ancestry, mainly Irish. The Irish of the time were gregarious - still are to a lesser extent. They rarely ventured from their own enclaves.
Ireland is not Britain. Britain consists of England, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall.

The Queen of England is styled "queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".
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Old 04-28-2022, 09:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit33 View Post
Ireland is not Britain. Britain consists of England, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall.

The Queen of England is styled "queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".
Ireland was part of the British Isles for centuries (geographically it still is) and during the great waves of Irish migration to the Americas in the 19th century, Ireland was part of Britain. "Great Britain" included all of Ireland, which was bound to the bigger island legally, politically, and even culturally.

As much as the Irish want to protest otherwise, nitpicking over semantics here isn't particularly helpful. "British" itself is not an ethnic descriptor as English or Scottish or Cornish or Irish are, but a political term. One can be both Irish and British, as many in Northern Ireland will tell you.
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Old 04-28-2022, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
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My direct ancestor immigrated from Heidelberg, Germany to Philadelphia on the good ship Beulah in 1753 via Rotterdam.
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Old 04-28-2022, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DXBtoFL View Post
Ireland was part of the British Isles for centuries (geographically it still is) and during the great waves of Irish migration to the Americas in the 19th century, Ireland was part of Britain. "Great Britain" included all of Ireland, which was bound to the bigger island legally, politically, and even culturally.

As much as the Irish want to protest otherwise, nitpicking over semantics here isn't particularly helpful. "British" itself is not an ethnic descriptor as English or Scottish or Cornish or Irish are, but a political term. One can be both Irish and British, as many in Northern Ireland will tell you.
Well, there are some errors in the above, but the POINT is that ethnic white Europeans of descent that isn't English or Scottish are ALL OVER Boston. As I noted, large large numbers of Irish and Italian, plus Portuguese, Eastern European, Armenians (OK, more Watertown than Boston but same thing, really) and a host of other ethnicities I'm not thinking of right now. French Canadians, too.

Of course the population in 1800 were mostly of English descent, but for that matter the population of the northern United States and the tidewater South was too - of course there were some Dutch around New York, probably some other lacunae in there too. The backwoods South was largely Scotch-Irish (Ulster Scots).

I'd say the actual answer to the OP's question about the large amounts of immigration through NYC would have to do with the actual size of the ports. By the time the biggest waves from Europe started, NYC was THE leading port on the East Coast. So most of the ships would have gone to NYC, thus more opportunities for less-expensive fares and more chances that a ship going to the US from one's port of embarkation would be going to NYC.
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Old 04-28-2022, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Camberville
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My family is such an honest display of Massachusetts ancestry - half of my ancestors can be traced back to the 1600s from the UK, with a handful of more recent English, Irish, or Canadian immigrants. The other half all immigrated between 1895 and 1905 from what is now Ukraine and Belarus. For the latter half of my ancestry, there are no records of them through Ellis Island, but it's unclear where they arrived. At least one great grandfather's mythology involves immigrating to Canada and then crossing the border in the teens/20s.
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Old 04-28-2022, 06:20 PM
 
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Circling back to the question posited by the OP - why did Boston not get the immigration that New York did?

The following is an opinion, formed from previous knowledge gleaned while researching another question concerning US federal taxation prior to, during, and after the American Civil War. I've added in some further quick research about the ships that plied the Atlantic Ocean between America and Europe. If anyone has any dispute or issue with my commentary below, by all means, please speak up! I welcome both accurate correction and further information on the subject.

What I do know is that during the 19th Century, the United States shipped vast amounts of raw material to Europe and in return, Europe shipped manufactured goods to the United States. I believe that there was a notable imbalance in raw tonnage being shipped, ships headed towards America carried less tonnage than on the return trip back to Europe. During the 19th Century, the British began constructing new types of ships for the trans-Atlantic trade - first, wooden steam-powered paddle wheelers, later wooden screw propeller steam ships, and finally iron hulled screw propeller steam ships. Each iteration allowed larger and stronger ships to be built, with faster transit times being achieved. As these transatlantic ships became more advanced, they also began providing better passenger accommodations for the trip from Europe to the United States, finally culminating in the great ocean liners of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Winding back to wooden sailing ships carrying trade between the two continents...when the Irish Potato Famine hit in 1847, one solution of the British government was, since they couldn't ship enough food to the Irish, they would instead ship the Irish to where there was no famine. This is why Boston and New York, among other places, received large numbers of Irish immigrants.

Later, Germans, taking advantage of availability of space on trans-Atlantic ships, started emigrating from Europe to the United States, but under different circumstances. I may not be correct about this, but I believe that the Germans may have been emigrating in response to the various German revolutions of 1848-1849, being on the losing side of said revolutions and seeking escape from possible retribution from their victorious foes. Some of them may also have been middle class Germans who were emigrating in order to not be drafted into the armies of the various German states. Many of these German immigrants were not exactly refugees, as they came with what wealth they were able to obtain from liquidating their properties and holdings in Europe. Unlike the Irish refugees, (and thanks to railroads) numerous German immigrants, equipped with some measure of wealth, were able to move farther inland, establishing themselves as farmers in the American Midwest and as tradespeople and shop owners in Midwestern cities.

In the later half of the 19th Century and up to WW1, immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe began taking the same paths into the United States, possibly driven by the same factors as previous immigration waves. Depending on their fortunes, some stayed in the cities where they landed, some moved on towards the cities and rural areas in the interior.

I'm now going to address the discrepancy between New York immigration and Boston immigration during the 19th Century. I know that during the 19th Century, most (nearly all?) federal revenues were generated by import tariffs and that in 1860 somewhere around 66% of all import tariffs were collected in the Port of New York. I would posit that, simply due to the immense size of transatlantic trade going through New York allowed it to receive the bulk of European immigration. That's not to say that other ports, such as Boston, didn't receive European immigrants - there were just so many more who disembarked in New York Harbor.
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Old 04-29-2022, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
27,246 posts, read 13,534,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit33 View Post
Ireland is not Britain. Britain consists of England, Scotland, Wales, and Cornwall.

The Queen of England is styled "queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".
Cornwall is an English county and not a country or state within the Union.

The UK includes England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Great Britain is the greater of the two main islands that constitute the British Isles, and includes England, Scotland and Wales, however Northern Ireland is usually added when meaning the entire union, or the term UK is used instead.

In terms of the British Isles, it's a geographic term rather than a political one, and consists of the entirety of Great Britain, as well as the island of Ireland, along with other islands.
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