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Old 03-17-2020, 09:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khan Vozdig View Post

Of course Baltimore received a fair amount , however that city seems to be the lone exception ...

John Waters says that it's because every goofball from Tennessee and North Carolina that was trying to make it to New York City ran out of gas in Baltimore and just stayed there.
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Old 03-19-2020, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Hungary
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I don't know about the other two, but your premise about Philadelphia is incorrect. Probably about Columbus, too - the Ohio cities with larger Appalachian migration are Cincinnati, Dayton, Akron, and Toledo.


The lower the numbers, the easier to assimilate. The higher the numbers, the more likely to congregate. In Cincinnati, many descendants from Appalachian migrants have chosen not to assimilate; instead, they celebrate their heritage instead of downplaying it.


You're forgetting the most obvious reason: distance. Distance, and access. Detroit had the Dixie Highway - U.S. 25 - which stretched from Tennessee and Kentucky into western Ohio and Michigan. Cincinnati - the first stop north from Appalachia - is 3 or 4 hours from eastern Kentucky, Dayton another hour, and Detroit is another 4 hours. Well,it took an hour or two longer before the interstates. Kentucky to Baltimore or Philadelphia is a lot longer, with or without interstates.

Did Philadelphia really receive a significant number of Appalachian migrants ? If so then how come I haven't been able to find any sources online that support that claim ?


Thanks for your input by the way !
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Old 03-19-2020, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
29,112 posts, read 69,404,320 times
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During WWII Detroit and to a lesser extent other rustbelt areas became the "Arsenal of Democracy." Manufacturing capacity was ramped up to unprecedented levels. When the war ended, the factories were converted back to making cars, appliances, parts for houses, and machines for other factories. Then ore factories were built for smaller companies supplying all of these manufacturers. All of these places needed people to run them.

the northeast did nto become a huge manufacturing center for several reasons:
1. They did not have Henry Ford, and thus were not already the major manufacturing center for making machines and parts of machines.
2. They were smaller states and had been long settled. Real estate in populated areas was at a premium and due to tight quarters pollution was already a bigger problem than it was in more open areas.
3. Being older, these areas were already developing more of a service economy (publishing, banking/finance; entertainment; etc.).
4. Ready access to natural resources, especially water. Much of the East coast was already pillaged. The Midwest, especially the northern Midwest was still loaded. Also the abundance of waterways provided a ready means of moving heavy resources and finished products.
5. Less value as potential farmland. Swampy, rocky treey land is less suited to farming. Thus, it is an ideal place to develop manufacturing.

Specifically right after the war it was because there were a lot of factories with a ton of capacity already built and operating. .
What interests me is why Minnesota did not become more of a manufacturing center than it did.

It is also possible that places like Boston already had a large working class population (Irish in Boston for example), and did not need or would not welcome another.
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Old 03-20-2020, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Hungary
297 posts, read 96,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
During WWII Detroit and to a lesser extent other rustbelt areas became the "Arsenal of Democracy." Manufacturing capacity was ramped up to unprecedented levels. When the war ended, the factories were converted back to making cars, appliances, parts for houses, and machines for other factories. Then ore factories were built for smaller companies supplying all of these manufacturers. All of these places needed people to run them.

the northeast did nto become a huge manufacturing center for several reasons:
1. They did not have Henry Ford, and thus were not already the major manufacturing center for making machines and parts of machines.
2. They were smaller states and had been long settled. Real estate in populated areas was at a premium and due to tight quarters pollution was already a bigger problem than it was in more open areas.
3. Being older, these areas were already developing more of a service economy (publishing, banking/finance; entertainment; etc.).
4. Ready access to natural resources, especially water. Much of the East coast was already pillaged. The Midwest, especially the northern Midwest was still loaded. Also the abundance of waterways provided a ready means of moving heavy resources and finished products.
5. Less value as potential farmland. Swampy, rocky treey land is less suited to farming. Thus, it is an ideal place to develop manufacturing.

Specifically right after the war it was because there were a lot of factories with a ton of capacity already built and operating. .
What interests me is why Minnesota did not become more of a manufacturing center than it did.

It is also possible that places like Boston already had a large working class population (Irish in Boston for example), and did not need or would not welcome another.
Yes FWIW the truth is that White Appalachian migration to the urban centers of the Midwest , just like the Second Great Migration of African Americans to urban areas outside of the South , started during WW2 and continued till roughly 1970 so thanks for bringing that up ...

This fact however begs another question , which is that how come many African Americans migrated to Northeastern cities during this time period while White Appalachians for the most part did not ?
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Old 03-20-2020, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Hungary
297 posts, read 96,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
John Waters says that it's because every goofball from Tennessee and North Carolina that was trying to make it to New York City ran out of gas in Baltimore and just stayed there.

Lol that sound funny , even though I have no clue who this John Waters fellow is ...
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Old 03-20-2020, 01:40 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,584 posts, read 29,965,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khan Vozdig View Post
I mean I'm not aware of Philadelphia having/having had any significant numbers of Appalachian enclaves in the post WW2 era ...


That said you may very well know more about this issue than I do , in which case please feel free to correct me/expound on the subject .
I worked with people, both black and white, who came with their families from those areas as children. Some were the children of migrants from those areas. What else is there to say? They didn't live in enclaves.

Yes, I certainly know more about my coworkers than you do.
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Old 03-20-2020, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Hungary
297 posts, read 96,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
I worked with people, both black and white, who came with their families from those areas as children. Some were the children of migrants from those areas. What else is there to say? They didn't live in enclaves.

Yes, I certainly know more about my coworkers than you do.

Lol I mean it's not like I've claimed to know more about your coworkers than you ...


FWIW why do you think that ( at least seemingly ) no Appalachian enclaves formed in Philadelphia like they did in Baltimore , Chicago , Detroit and many other cities ?
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Old 03-21-2020, 07:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khan Vozdig View Post
Lol that sound funny , even though I have no clue who this John Waters fellow is ...
John Waters -

Baltimore film-maker, creator of "Pink Flamingos", "Female Trouble", and "Hairspray".
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Old 03-21-2020, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Hungary
297 posts, read 96,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
John Waters -

Baltimore film-maker, creator of "Pink Flamingos", "Female Trouble", and "Hairspray".

Thanks for the answer !
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:17 PM
 
4,096 posts, read 5,729,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khan Vozdig View Post
I imagine most African Americans who migrated north as well as west came from the Lower South what with said states having a rather high percentage of African Americans to this very day unlike Appalachia ...
Most African American migrants to the northeast coastal cities Philadelphia, N.Y. City, Baltimore, Wash D.C., historically came from tobacco and cotton farms, textile and sawmills of eastern North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. Many rode on trains directly from the Carolina's.

Most African American migrants to Chicago and Saint Louis, historically came from the deep southern states Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, Tennessee, Louisiana. They typically rode on the "Illinois Central Railroad" the subject of Arlo Guthrie's famous folk.song "City of New Orleans".
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