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Old 03-24-2020, 01:28 PM
 
4,108 posts, read 5,758,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khan Vozdig View Post
What do you mean by they weren't that desperate ?
Maybe he means that New York City and Philadelphia were extremely large cities, they were over.crowded with row-houses and tenement apartments with no grass or yards, and a very high percentage of Jewish people. The midwestern cities were slightly smaller in population, and have more detached houses with some grass and small yards.
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Old 03-25-2020, 04:27 AM
 
Location: Hungary
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
Maybe he means that New York City and Philadelphia were extremely large cities, they were over.crowded with row-houses and tenement apartments with no grass or yards, and a very high percentage of Jewish people. The midwestern cities were slightly smaller in population, and have more detached houses with some grass and small yards.

Is or was Anti Jewish sentiment strong among White Appalachians ?


Thanks for the answer by the way !
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Old 03-25-2020, 09:41 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,628 posts, read 30,063,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Khan Vozdig View Post
Lol I mean it's not like I've claimed to know more about your coworkers than you ...


FWIW why do you think that ( at least seemingly ) no Appalachian enclaves formed in Philadelphia like they did in Baltimore , Chicago , Detroit and many other cities ?
Whether enclaves formed early on, I don't know, but when the mills started closing down, some followed the mills to North Carolina, some moved within the Delaware Valley for other jobs.
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Old 03-26-2020, 08:33 AM
 
4,231 posts, read 4,209,254 times
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Originally Posted by Khan Vozdig View Post
It's a widely known historical fact that many Appalachians migrated to cities like Columbus , Detroit , and Chicago in the post WW2 era , however the same cannot be said of places like Philadelphia , NYC , and Boston ...


Of course Baltimore received a fair amount , however that city seems to be the lone exception ...

In short how and why did this state of affairs come about ?

Also are there any good books and/or articles out there that deal with this subject ?

Baltimore and Washington did get a huge amount. It is still obvious every Thanksgiving when everyone heads to their traditional family homes in West Virginia and Western Virginia. Just sit on I-70 between Frederick and Hagerstown (The two big junction points of major Highways) and watch the traffic. I understand that it is similar on I-64 in Richmond


A lot of this goes back to the mobilization in WWII. The shipyards and factories recruited from 'underutilized' labor pools in the south. The North East didn't see as much creation of totally new factories just a ramping up of existing factories which was handled generally by finding labor in more immediate areas. There are several good books on this but the labor mobilization is usually covered in one or two chapters in each book. Freedoms Forge by Arthur Herman is one that I remember off the top of my head. The U.S. Army History of World War II (Known as the 'Green Books'. a huge series full of details and excellent maps All available as PDF or HTML online) volume 'The Army and Economic Mobilization' probably has plenty on it. https://history.army.mil/html/books/001/1-7/index.html
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Old 03-27-2020, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Hungary
297 posts, read 97,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
Baltimore and Washington did get a huge amount. It is still obvious every Thanksgiving when everyone heads to their traditional family homes in West Virginia and Western Virginia. Just sit on I-70 between Frederick and Hagerstown (The two big junction points of major Highways) and watch the traffic. I understand that it is similar on I-64 in Richmond


A lot of this goes back to the mobilization in WWII. The shipyards and factories recruited from 'underutilized' labor pools in the south. The North East didn't see as much creation of totally new factories just a ramping up of existing factories which was handled generally by finding labor in more immediate areas. There are several good books on this but the labor mobilization is usually covered in one or two chapters in each book. Freedoms Forge by Arthur Herman is one that I remember off the top of my head. The U.S. Army History of World War II (Known as the 'Green Books'. a huge series full of details and excellent maps All available as PDF or HTML online) volume 'The Army and Economic Mobilization' probably has plenty on it. https://history.army.mil/html/books/001/1-7/index.html

Thanks for the answer !
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