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Old 06-20-2020, 06:26 PM
 
Location: South FL
5,441 posts, read 6,613,141 times
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Greetings.

I've been watching vikings tv shows in Netflix and Hulu as of lately. Vikings from Hulu is based on actual historial events, but the rest is purely fictional. The Last Kingdom, is based off a historial novel based on true events.

Now, anyone from the UK, how has vikings/scandinavian culture impacted the island's culture? Do they have historic artifacts from that era? Does Old Norse have any influence in the English language?. These series have given me a rise of interest in vikings culture (as you can see from my username ).

Elaborate
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Old 06-20-2020, 07:15 PM
 
Location: The North Star State
2,563 posts, read 777,111 times
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I'm assuming that by 'Viking' you mean 'Norse'. The terms are sometimes used interchangeably, but sometimes differentiating the raider subset of Norse from the broader population.

Estimates are that roughly 5% of English vocabulary is from Old Norse (the ancestor of today's Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Icelandic and Faroese). that includes quite a bit of basic terminology.

About 20% of British DNA is Norse.

Norse place-names exist, concentrated in Scotland, especially the islands. They become less common south in England.

People with metal detectors occasionally stumble upon ancient treasure hoards. Sometimes these are Norse in origin.

While the Norse left their mark, they did ultimately leave and their influences were subsumed into the greater Anglo-Saxon culture.
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Old 06-21-2020, 03:08 AM
 
Location: SE UK
8,555 posts, read 7,391,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bjorn_Ironside32 View Post
Greetings.

I've been watching vikings tv shows in Netflix and Hulu as of lately. Vikings from Hulu is based on actual historial events, but the rest is purely fictional. The Last Kingdom, is based off a historial novel based on true events.

Now, anyone from the UK, how has vikings/scandinavian culture impacted the island's culture? Do they have historic artifacts from that era? Does Old Norse have any influence in the English language?. These series have given me a rise of interest in vikings culture (as you can see from my username ).

Elaborate
For a time the Vikings ruled over the North eastern half of the British Isles, it was called 'Danelaw', there are a lot of Viking place names in this part of the world (ie in modern day Yorkshire). Despite what many people on here seem to think, the UK is not simply Anglo Saxon, historically MANY people from across Europe (more recently from across the globe) have settled in the UK in large numbers (sometimes peacefully sometimes by invasion) and each wave of immigration has left it's mark on UK DNA, culture and language (including our Norse friends)
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Old 06-21-2020, 09:18 PM
 
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Talk about language. The Vikings caused the greatest shift to the English language grammar. Before the Danelaw, old English just like German today used cases for nouns - thus the word endings give the meaning to a sentence. The word order is not important. With the Vikings, English shifted to word order (subject-predicate-object) and direct/ indirect object with prepositions but no more changing word endings. Funny thing is the German language retained the Latin grammar without ever having been a Romance language. Whereas English, French, Spanish, Italian and Romanian now use indirect/direct objects with prepositions. My wife who is from New York and me from Germany were wondering why the grammars are so different whereas you can tell the the root words are similar in both languages. Then we stumbled upon the Viking influence.
I hated when translating Latin -particularly Cicero's orations- they can switch around the word order in sentences at will and you have to always search for the subject and verb. This makes today's English a lot easier to understand IMO. Thank the Vikings.
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Old Yesterday, 05:00 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
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I saw something recently (TV show, I think) that said the Vikings/Norse occupied parts of England but then left or were expelled. I don't think that DNA supports that. Some might have left but they seem to be firmly planted in the population. I have Norse Norman ancestors who were only two or three generations in Normandy and Wallonia/Belgium from raiding Vikings warlords. They fought with William and one became the Steward of England when William went back to Normandy. Scratch them and you would find Vikings.
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Old Yesterday, 06:33 PM
 
Location: The North Star State
2,563 posts, read 777,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
I saw something recently (TV show, I think) that said the Vikings/Norse occupied parts of England but then left or were expelled. I don't think that DNA supports that. Some might have left but they seem to be firmly planted in the population. I have Norse Norman ancestors who were only two or three generations in Normandy and Wallonia/Belgium from raiding Vikings warlords. They fought with William and one became the Steward of England when William went back to Normandy. Scratch them and you would find Vikings.
I think 'the Danes were expelled' means that the Danish rule was ended.

For example, the Danelaw lasted for 90 years. It ended with the defeat of Eric Bloodaxe. But the Danish settlers would have mostly remained. Some Danes were even assimilated into English ruling elite. For example, Oda of Canterbury was the son of Danish parents yet rose to become Archbishop of Canterbury in 941 under Edmund I (and his later successors), in areas formerly of the Danelaw but retaken piecemeal before the eventually eviction of the Danes (ie, the end of Danish rule). So the Norse were no longer in power - or to the extent that they were, such as Oda, they were ruling at English pleasure - but they were still spreading their DNA far and wide.

Of course, the Danes would come again to England, seizing the entire kingdom in the 11th century, though IIRC there was much less in the way of Norse settlers during that (briefer) go-round.
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Old Today, 03:38 PM
 
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My roots are in NE England, north of Hadrian's Wall. My DNA test showed a significant percentage of Scandinavian ancestry.

You may be interested in the Jorvik Viking Center in York if you want to know more about the history of the Norse in Britain.
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