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Old 07-24-2008, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Cosmic Consciousness
3,871 posts, read 15,927,729 times
Reputation: 2655

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MICoastieMom View Post
I think the 50's were a great time to be a kid, and look how many of us turned out to be liberals! Wonder what the conservatives think about that?
HEAR! HEAR! What a real and interesting observation!!
I don't remember the 50s -- I was too busy playing and climbing trees, and preparing for piano concerts, and all the dancing lessons that I loved -- and being the smartest kid in the class which was a trip that I DO remember! I remember my mother's great cooking, my friends, the cat, my father buying a new Pontiac every three years, our comfortable life, never once thinking about "serious" stuff, and the presents under the christmas tree -- the more the better! My mother made the BEST gravy in the world!! Uhhhh, what was the question??
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Old 07-25-2008, 01:45 AM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 11,344,553 times
Reputation: 6631
I was born in 1950, female in Portland, OR when it was a small town.

What I remember most was the "what will the neighbors think 'tude". If you were "different" in any way it was discouraged. My neighborhood was full of boys and I played with them, imagine how I felt when I was forced into frilly dresses to go to school. No sports for me growing up even though I was just as good at baseball and other sports as the boys. I was expected to sit and watch.

I remember early the inequities, I was raised in a whitebread neighborhood, my family denied their native american heritage, it was difficult for me as I got the darker skin and hair that my sibs did not. My mother would tell people it was our "French" heritage.

I was told what to wear, what was acceptable behavior, the list of what I could not do was long and would be considered ridiculous now.

I was denied a college education by my parents (even tho they could afford it) because it would be wasted on a girl. I eventually did put myself thru college and my mothers comment was "don't let anyone think your smart, you won't get a good husband".

The list goes on and on. Did I rebel when the late 60's happened you betcha. I felt so stifled and intollerant of the Ozzie and Harriet box my parents wanted to put me in.

The one good thing I remember most is my bike and the freedom it gave me on weekends and summers. I would ride for miles and miles and explore the countryside without fear. I think this was more that Ptown was pretty rural once you got outside of downtown.

For me being raised in the 50's was stifling.
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Old 07-25-2008, 02:11 AM
 
2,255 posts, read 5,030,459 times
Reputation: 783
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReturningWest View Post
I was born in 1950, female in Portland, OR when it was a small town.

What I remember most was the "what will the neighbors think 'tude". If you were "different" in any way it was discouraged. My neighborhood was full of boys and I played with them, imagine how I felt when I was forced into frilly dresses to go to school. No sports for me growing up even though I was just as good at baseball and other sports as the boys. I was expected to sit and watch.

I remember early the inequities, I was raised in a whitebread neighborhood, my family denied their native american heritage, it was difficult for me as I got the darker skin and hair that my sibs did not. My mother would tell people it was our "French" heritage.

I was told what to wear, what was acceptable behavior, the list of what I could not do was long and would be considered ridiculous now.

I was denied a college education by my parents (even tho they could afford it) because it would be wasted on a girl. I eventually did put myself thru college and my mothers comment was "don't let anyone think your smart, you won't get a good husband".

The list goes on and on. Did I rebel when the late 60's happened you betcha. I felt so stifled and intollerant of the Ozzie and Harriet box my parents wanted to put me in.

For me being raised in the 50's was stifling.
Along those racial lines and the unfairness back then. How about the racial sterilizations (Eugenics) & government disease experiments performed on blacks in the USA. Other governments also took up the Eugenics racial purity cause as well. Australia also had a program against the aboriginals. No doubt there were many sad things for many during that time of Media propaganda of everything rosy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MICoastieMom
I think the 50s were a great time to be a kid, and look how many of us turned out to be Liberals! Wonder what the conservatives think about that?
Hopefully one day there won't be any Conservatives or Liberals. I think this world has had enough of listening to their vicious hatred towards each other , while the common Joe/Jane on the sidelines get screwed by both of them.
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Old 07-25-2008, 10:48 AM
 
1,166 posts, read 3,620,220 times
Reputation: 379
Returning West,

Although my father thought I should become a secretary or a nurse, my mother prevailed and I was allowed to go to college. But I wasn't allowed to study architecture as I wanted. I was told I could become a teacher or a social worker - women's professions. My aunt used to tell me to keep my eye out for a good med student: "Remember," she used to say, "it's just as easy to fall in love with a rich man as a poor man." The theory, of course, was that I wouldn't HAVE to work if I married a doctor. The whole family had a fit when I broke up with my intern boyfriend. Can anyone imagine this happening today?
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Old 07-25-2008, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Southern Ontario
439 posts, read 498,111 times
Reputation: 756
A woman's whole life was lived thru her husband back then. Her place in society, income status, and her identity were all tied up with his. The thought of a women having a job other than secretary nurse, stewardess, or homemaker was laughable. Nobody could imagine a woman being the president of a company a pilot or a doctor either. And if you had an outside job, you were expected to give it up when you got married to raise children.
I can easily imagine your family's reaction Barj, when you broke up with the intern. Just out of curiosity, did you end marrying anyone your family liked or approved of?
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Old 07-25-2008, 05:15 PM
 
1,166 posts, read 3,620,220 times
Reputation: 379
I ended up at Yale grad school (my Dad helped pay for it, BTW) and married a Yale PhD, the son of a nationally known cardiologist. Not quite as good ($$$) as the three interns/residents I didn't marry, but they basically approved. Our daughter also has followed her own heart and not married the several lawyers and doctors who could have assured her a soft life.
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Old 07-26-2008, 08:05 AM
 
1,487 posts, read 2,142,512 times
Reputation: 941
I grew up in the 1950's and to me it was the best time of my life but that's because of my experiences and interests. It was the golden age (so far) of American culture and especially American Music. It was when "race music" became Rhythm and Blues, then Rock and Roll. Jazz (my special interest) flourished during that time. People of importance were more accessible than they are today, there was no stalking, crime was not rampant and families were closer. Perhaps it was a more conservative time politically but a fifteen year old didn't really care. Socially it was not so conservative and the strongest roots of the civil rights movement can be found during that era. It is also when women (my mother for one) began to take charge of their own destinies and move out into the world.

Sometime ago my kids who are now parents themselves asked about what I did earlier in life. I certainly could write to them about my life in the 60's. Who either wants to tell war stories and who really wants to hear about death and destruction especially your kids. So I began to write them a series of letters about by early teens on the 1950`s. They keep asking for more here is the first one I wrote to share with younger people on the board. This is just to show you how easy it was to meet and gain experience from people who's careers were your dreams and admired. baseball players didn't charge for auto.graphs, movies stars walk the streets without being mobbed and more.

My first meeting with Art Pepper

[SIZE=3] I was lucky enough to meet Art as a youngster growing up in Los Angeles in the 1950's. I guess I was about 16 at the time and just beginning to find my way around the tenor. So one night I was with a guy who was about Art's age and he was pretty good friends with Art at the time. I don't know if Art maintained contact with him but you might know. His name was Dave Nagata. He was a commercial artist at the Saul Bass studios and I think he was instrumental in the title design for the film "The Man with the Golden Arm". Dave was a friend of my parents but he took me under his wing so to speak. At that time we were living on Larissa Dr. and Dave lived on Descanso so I was at his house a lot and he had a great record collection that he let me listen to. Well one night he asked me if I'd like to meet Art Pepper. Well you can imagine the reaction of a 16 years old that was into jazz. So Dave took me with him to see Art. At that time Art was living pretty close by on Fargo. It started out all wrong because I hated driving on Fargo. it scared the hell out of me when I tried to drive up it myself and now I was in the car with a maniac driver going up this hill with the engine straining and me thinking the engine would die and so would we.. But every thing turned out fine and we got to Art's house but Dave made me wait in the car when he went inside. I was in the car for what seemed like ages then they both came out side. Well it was like seeing Superman. I got real nervous and it was Mr. Pepper this and that till he told me it would be a lot easier if I just called him Art. We sat there for a while smoking cigarettes and he asked me what horn I played and who I was listening too. An pretty soon it became real easy to talk or to listen . I'd ask a question and he'd give me a really detailed but understandable answer. I think Art's love of the music and his craft would have made him a really great teacher but at that time he was too busy playing. Anyway it was a really beautiful night, the talk, the atmosphere and I remember the smell of jasmine especially because I was from the East and I never encountered that smell until we moved to California. The best advice he gave me wasn't about soloing it was about reading. He told me to practice reading until I could sight read fly **** off of a wall. And the next time I saw him he repeated that to me. I guess he knew that it was easier to blow out all your fuses than to sit there and study sight reading.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=3] We smoked a couple of joints that Dave had brought along but there was no talk about heavy stuff. As a kid I never remember any of the musicians who were horse rustlers talking about that to me or my friends. A lot of people said that it was hard to talk to Art Pepper but I never found it so. The same was true of Miles Davis. In those days a 16 year old kid didn't know how to talk too much and become a pain in the ass. The other thing was that back then musicians were accessible. They walked around. They lived what they played and played what they lived and that's why I think, they played with much more passion and urgency than my generation. That was an important night in my life and even now, some 50 years later, it is still as fresh in my mind as if it had happened yesterday. Now that I think about it, it was a good thing we smoked a little because between the grass and the great conversation I don't even remember going down Fargo to get home.[/SIZE]
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
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Old 07-26-2008, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Southern Ontario
439 posts, read 498,111 times
Reputation: 756
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbJ View Post
I ended up at Yale grad school (my Dad helped pay for it, BTW) and married a Yale PhD, the son of a nationally known cardiologist. Not quite as good ($$$) as the three interns/residents I didn't marry, but they basically approved. Our daughter also has followed her own heart and not married the several lawyers and doctors who could have assured her a soft life.
Sounds like all turned out well. Thanks for satisfying my curiosity.
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Old 07-26-2008, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Trieste
930 posts, read 907,043 times
Reputation: 712
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReturningWest View Post
I was born in 1950, female in Portland, OR when it was a small town.

What I remember most was the "what will the neighbors think 'tude". If you were "different" in any way it was discouraged. My neighborhood was full of boys and I played with them, imagine how I felt when I was forced into frilly dresses to go to school. No sports for me growing up even though I was just as good at baseball and other sports as the boys. I was expected to sit and watch.

I remember early the inequities, I was raised in a whitebread neighborhood, my family denied their native american heritage, it was difficult for me as I got the darker skin and hair that my sibs did not. My mother would tell people it was our "French" heritage.

I was told what to wear, what was acceptable behavior, the list of what I could not do was long and would be considered ridiculous now.

I was denied a college education by my parents (even tho they could afford it) because it would be wasted on a girl. I eventually did put myself thru college and my mothers comment was "don't let anyone think your smart, you won't get a good husband".

The list goes on and on. Did I rebel when the late 60's happened you betcha. I felt so stifled and intollerant of the Ozzie and Harriet box my parents wanted to put me in.

The one good thing I remember most is my bike and the freedom it gave me on weekends and summers. I would ride for miles and miles and explore the countryside without fear. I think this was more that Ptown was pretty rural once you got outside of downtown.

For me being raised in the 50's was stifling.
This post really moved me.
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Old 07-26-2008, 01:00 PM
 
1,166 posts, read 3,620,220 times
Reputation: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Italian (x)lurker View Post
This post really moved me.

Me too.
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