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Old 04-10-2022, 08:03 PM
 
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The Tut exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum really saved the day for them.


Why King Tut Is Still Fascinating
He was a minor pharaoh, and the excavation of his tomb was a disreputable affair. But, a century later, there is more to learn.

Some critics have suggested abolishing the discipline of Egyptology entirely.
Tutankhamun ruled for only nine or ten years, starting at around age eight. Before the discovery of his tomb, he was rarely mentioned in histories of Egypt. Today, many more people can recount his biography than that of Neferkare, thought to have reigned the longest of any pharaoh, for between sixty-four and ninety-four years, starting when he was six; or that of Khufu, who was buried in the Great Pyramid of Giza; or even that of Ramses II, who is regarded as the most powerful of all the ancient rulers of Egypt.
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...ll-fascinating
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Old 04-10-2022, 10:38 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
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Tut might be the only Pharoah most people have heard of. I saw the travelling exhibit of his tomb treasures in London and was blown away. You see pictures in books or online and think they are remarkable, but up close, the craftsmanship and preservation is amazing. The tomb discovery was one of the most publicized events of the 20th century and fostered an Egyptian craze in design and fashion.

Tut occupied an interesting small niche in Egypt's history. His mom was thought to officially be Queen Nefertiti, but DNA tests point to the mummy of "The Younger Lady", maybe a lower ranked wife. His dad was also thought to be the Pharoah Akhenaten who is notorious for rejecting the old religion and converting to a single deity, Aten. That change brought religious chaos and upheaval after that Pharoah's death. Again, DNA tests cast doubt and show that Tut is likely the son of a royal mummy (called KV55) who might be Akhenaten's brother. Those two parents seem to be siblings and offspring of Amenhotep III, the predecessor and father of Akhenaten. KV55 seems to have (maybe) died too young to be Akhenaten but there is debate. Tut's wife was supposedly his half-sister, another child of Akhenaten. But the DNA logic would say that they might be cousins. Trying to put together a family tree for Tut will drive anyone nuts, especially now when DNA results confound the old ideas on family connections. They might change again. Tut restored the Ancient Egyptian religion rejected by Akhenaten, moved the capital city, became Pharoah at about age 9 and died before reaching 20. He fathered two daughters, but both died as infants or stillborn. He was physically disabled and walked with a cane. There are several ideas on how he died.
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Old 04-15-2022, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Spring Hill, FL
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His "dad" was the real interesting one IMO.

What happened to him to push his brand of monotheism and what happened during his reign that meant as soon as he died, the old ways were restored almost immediately?

I think Tut holds the public imagination purely because of the discovery of a complete tomb with all it's gold and riches.
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Old 04-15-2022, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Southern MN
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I saw it when it was in St. Paul, MN and it was one of the highlights of things I've hoped to someday see. Imagine all those treasures waiting in the dark for centuries.

What is it about Egyptology that makes it so fascinating to children?
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Old 04-15-2022, 10:31 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
What is it about Egyptology that makes it so fascinating to children?
I was bored in school and I remember in 5th grade (1958) writing off to Egypt's Cairo Museum asking for information on the ancient Egyptians, Pharaohs, Pyramids, etc. I got a huge response that forever got me interested in archaeology and history. Much of the information was on Tut but there was a lot on the pyramids and Sphinx. I had access to a short-wave radio that picked up English language broadcasts from all over the world and was very curious so I'd write off to Cairo or Paris like it was no big deal. And they would write back.
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Old 05-02-2022, 06:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterbeard View Post
His "dad" was the real interesting one IMO.

What happened to him to push his brand of monotheism and what happened during his reign that meant as soon as he died, the old ways were restored almost immediately?

I think Tut holds the public imagination purely because of the discovery of a complete tomb with all it's gold and riches.
Oh, of course. I agree.
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Old 05-06-2022, 06:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
I
What is it about Egyptology that makes it so fascinating to children?
A close parallel can be drawn between Egyptology and Dinosaurs.
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Old 05-06-2022, 07:09 AM
 
8,635 posts, read 9,144,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterbeard View Post
His "dad" was the real interesting one IMO.

What happened to him to push his brand of monotheism and what happened during his reign that meant as soon as he died, the old ways were restored almost immediately?

I think Tut holds the public imagination purely because of the discovery of a complete tomb with all it's gold and riches.
True, however his tomb was not the only one found complete or should I say mostly complete. I say that because it appears it was robbed also.

https://www.thecollector.com/ancient...er-discovered/
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Old 05-06-2022, 10:59 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterbeard View Post
His "dad" was the real interesting one IMO.

What happened to him to push his brand of monotheism and what happened during his reign that meant as soon as he died, the old ways were restored almost immediately?
If we could time travel, that would be an interesting moment in time to revisit. You are right -- there must have been some sort of personal departure or revelation that caused him to reorient the country's religion and forsake the "lessor" gods. The old priestly class was undone but would not give in. I suppose that might be an example of "deep state" opposition to change. He had no reason to trust the old guard and the old ways. He likely wrote off the old courtiers and favored his cult followers. There are some murky folks that were associated with him (Smenkhkare and Ay, for example) and they might have influenced his religious beliefs. There is scant evidence that he was any sort of a hero or major player in foreign affairs. The Hittites and the Myceneans were gaining power and alliances were shifting.
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Old 05-06-2022, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
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It could be that King Tut is more popular now than when he was alive, as weird as that may sound. With that said, I do have a very large coffee table book on King Tut that I bought last year. The only pharaoh of whom I bought a book and it will remain as the only one. lol
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