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Old 03-07-2009, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Flyover Country
26,211 posts, read 19,538,973 times
Reputation: 21679

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And instead of naturally grown clothing that is durable, breathable, and extremely tough, we get nylon. One other thing: Andrew Mellon is one of the 5 richest people in the last 2000 years

Quote:
Around 1935 Dupont had patented a new synthetic fibre called Nylon, and a great deal of money was invested in an extensive campaign to market Nylon to the public. Hemp at this stage was still a legal crop, and though its natural attributes were many, it's labour intensive production process made it very expensive in comparison with cotton and the new, chemically-produced Nylon.

However, a machine which had been invented in the early 1900's and perfected around 1937 was set to revolutionise the Hemp industry. The decorticator would separate the hurds from the stalks, leaving the long fibres ready to be put into bails. What the "cotton gin" did for the cotton industry, the decorticator was about to do for the manufacturing of a wide variety of hemp products, especially paper-making, rope-making and as a raw material for clothing manufacture. Dupont stood to lose millions.
Dupont and the hemp conspiracy - a chain of coincidences? legistlature (http://www.inya-face.com/hemp/05_Dupont.htm - broken link)
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Old 09-28-2013, 01:54 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,635 times
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Default Reversing the Dupont/Rockefeller Conspiracy to Make Hemp Illegal

Cannabis is a family of plants which includes both industrial hemp (with very little THCa) and cannabis indica (with more THCa). Cannabis indica had been used as medicine for thousands of years, and by the 1930s, extracts of it were used as ingredients in 40 to 50 percent of all medicines for people and animals sold in the U.S.

In 1937, there was about to be a tremendous breakthrough in textile and paper production, as well as in all kinds of products such as varnishes and paints. That breakthrough was heralded in Popular Mechanics, with the front page story "Hemp: The Billion Dollar Crop!" IT was based on the invention of a machine, the decorticator, which made it easy to access hemp fibers for paper and textiles.

This meant that hemp seed and oil would also be more plentiful; a variety of other products could also be developed from hemp oil. (In fact, the first Model T was made to run on hemp oil.) But even as that Popular Mechanics story was being written, Dupont, William Randolph Hearst, Harry Anslinger, and Harry's uncle, Andrew Mellon, had figured out a way to protect their own financial interests (in wood pulp and fossil fuels as a raw source of paper, textiles, and other products made from fossil fuels, such as paints, varnishes and medicines -- products that could also be made from, and were made from. hemp oil).

This plan was why Hearst's newspapers ran false and sensationalized stories about "marijuana" and why Hollywood (Hearst's mistress, Marion Davies, gave him access to Hollywood filmmakers) produced sensationalized (and false) stories about "reefer madness." This plan was also supported by Harry Anslinger, whose federal agency enforced alcohol prohibition, and who, with the end of alcohol prohibition, was about to be out of a job.

By sensationalizing "marijuana" as a dangerous drug, and rushing a law taxing it through Congress so as to make it unattainable, Anslinger managed to make not only "marijuana" illegal, but the other cannabis plant, industrial hemp, illegal, too. The AMA representative showed up at the last bit of the Congressional hearings, but by then it was too late. Asked why the AMA hadn't spoken up earlier, the rep replied that no one knew the medicine as "marijuana " -- it was cannabis indica!

The major beneficiaries of this law were not just Hearst and Dupont, but the oil magnate, John D. Rockefeller. Hemp oil had been planned to be used as fuel by not only Henry T; Ford, but by Diesel, too. Once industrial hemp was made illegal, hemp oil was also no longer available. But this gave fossil fuels an edge not only as a fuel, but also as the basis for the creation of medicines. Prescription medicines are made from fossil fuels, too. In fact, Rockefeller endowed a number of Ivy League schools with funds to create medical schools, but only on condition that they teach only "modern" medicine. Modern medicine meant NO HERBAL REMEDIES, and the use of precise dosages of prescription drugs.

We now know that the reason cannabis indica worked so well for so many people and animals is that cannabis contains at least 80 known phyto-cannabinoids, chemical compounds which mimic the endo-canabinoids naturally made by all animals' bodies. If such endo-cannabinoids were missing or low, cananbis extracts could supplement them. The endo-cannabinoid system is responsible for keeping all body systems in harmony, which is why cannabis extracts are particularly helpful in treating autoimmune diseases, in which one body system attacks another system, e.g., multiple sclerosis in which the nervous system is attacked by the body's own immune system.

It is time to reverse the results of the fossil fuel conspiracy and to return to industrial hemp and cannabis as renewable, less-polluting-than-fossil-fuel sources of fuel,fiber and medicine, and food, too, since hemp seeds are an excellent source of protein. One way to do so is to support the California Cannabis Hemp Initiative 2014 by helping to collect signatures on the petitions to place it on the ballot in 2014. If 3,000 people who want a better future for our species each collected 200 signatures, this initiative will be placed on the 2014 ballot, and if it's on the ballot, it will pass.

To read its text, to volunteer to collect signatures, or to donate money for publicity, go to [URL="http://www.cchi2014.org/index.html"]cchi2014.org Liberate Cannabis Hemp 100% for California 2014 Jack Herer Marijuana Initiative[/URL]
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Old 09-28-2013, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Berwick, Penna.
16,216 posts, read 11,347,737 times
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And some people claim that only aging conservatives hatch conspiracy theories???

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 09-28-2013 at 06:29 PM..
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Old 09-28-2013, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
29,837 posts, read 24,933,447 times
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Prohibition of marijuana excludes hemp. They were using it for all sorts of purposes. The navy even used it for ropes and canvases during WW2. Very strong fabric with all sorts of commercial and industrial applications.

Perhaps it was a case that nylon was just a cheaper material, so it was the popular choice? You can by hemp cloths today, just like you could for hundreds of years. For one reason or another, most people prefer cloths made with other fabrics.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:08 PM
 
5,117 posts, read 6,102,501 times
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The big early use of nylon was as a silk replacement when the asian silk production regions were unavailable. Parachutes were one of the first major uses
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Old 09-30-2013, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,840 posts, read 9,208,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andywire View Post
Prohibition of marijuana excludes hemp. They were using it for all sorts of purposes. The navy even used it for ropes and canvases during WW2. Very strong fabric with all sorts of commercial and industrial applications.

Perhaps it was a case that nylon was just a cheaper material, so it was the popular choice? You can by hemp cloths today, just like you could for hundreds of years. For one reason or another, most people prefer cloths made with other fabrics.
Maybe because nylon wasn't really a substitute for just hemp. See below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
The big early use of nylon was as a silk replacement when the asian silk production regions were unavailable. Parachutes were one of the first major uses
Another big use for nylon as a substitute for silk: ladies' hosiery. In the 1920s, ladies wore very expensive silk stockings. After WW II and before pantyhose, ladies wore "nylons":

Quote:
ny·lon

[nahy-lon]
noun 1. any of a class of thermoplastic polyamides capable of extrusion when molten into fibers, sheets, etc., of extreme toughness, strength, and elasticity, synthesized by the interaction of a dicarboxylic acid with a diamine: used especially for yarn, fabrics, and bristles, as for brushes.

2. nylons, stockings made of nylon, especially sheer, full-length ones for women.


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Old 09-30-2013, 09:53 AM
 
14,780 posts, read 43,715,753 times
Reputation: 14622
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
And some people claim that only aging conservatives hatch conspiracy theories???
ROFL...

One would think that the cannabis supporters would be well aware of the fact that in no way, shape or form has it ever been illegal to manufacture products from hemp. One would also think they would have heard of the term "nylons" as in stockings and understand how important it was to the war effort.

Anyway, one of the more interesting claims was the "hemp car" by Ford. This is completely false, yet often posted on many sites, especially the pro-cannabis ones. "Angry Historian" did a good debunking on that one...

The Angry Historian: The Hemp Car - Myth Busted

Long story short, Ford did use small quantities of hemp in the cellulose portion of plastic body panels he was working on manufacturing. The cars bodies were 70% cellulose and 30% binding agent. The 70% cellulose was composed of: 50% pine, 30% straw, 10% hemp and 10% ramie.

As for "hemp oil" the original Model T did run on hemp oil or gasoline, the buyer chose which. By the 1920's fuel derived from hemp was far more expensive than gasoline and Ford dropped the hemp fuel option as no one wanted to buy them.
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Old 10-28-2013, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 26,766,593 times
Reputation: 5038
Quote:
Originally Posted by andywire View Post
Prohibition of marijuana excludes hemp. They were using it for all sorts of purposes. The navy even used it for ropes and canvases during WW2. Very strong fabric with all sorts of commercial and industrial applications.

Perhaps it was a case that nylon was just a cheaper material, so it was the popular choice? You can by hemp cloths today, just like you could for hundreds of years. For one reason or another, most people prefer cloths made with other fabrics.
So that means I can grow hemp on my farm without being killed by thugs wearing masks and with the initials DEA?
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Old 10-29-2013, 07:55 AM
 
14,780 posts, read 43,715,753 times
Reputation: 14622
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
So that means I can grow hemp on my farm without being killed by thugs wearing masks and with the initials DEA?
It is still illegal to grow commercial hemp in the US, but it is not illegal to buy hemp or hemp products.
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Old 11-04-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,632 posts, read 14,954,251 times
Reputation: 15935
About a mile from my home is the campus of buildings that comprised DuPont's Marshall Laboratories (Grey's Ferry Road and the Schuylkill River) ... that is where Teflon was developed. Just in the past year or two the University of Pennsylvania purchased the campus (it's about 60 acres with approx. 30 buildings) because it's just across the Schuykill River from Penn's campus. Those of us who live in the greater Wilmington Delaware and Philadelphia area realize that DuPont is not a mere corporation but an empire unto itself.
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