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Old 04-22-2009, 07:06 AM
 
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this is so true. unfortunately, we will never know all of what happened in history and the very many interesting tapestries that were never expressed in record or even personal stories that will never be told.
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Old 04-22-2009, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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In 1919, the influenza pandemic was seen in Japan for what it was, and strict quarantines and travel restrictions were put in place. Japan had nearly the lowest incidence of deaths of any country in the world from the flu. Nevertheless, the flu killed more Japanese than the Atomic Bombs did. Health authorities now believe the estimates of 50-million dead worldwide are too low. The USA lost over half a million. Worldwide, the flu killed more people in 25 weeks than AIDS has killed in 25 years.
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Old 04-22-2009, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
In 1919, the influenza pandemic was seen in Japan for what it was, and strict quarantines and travel restrictions were put in place. Japan had nearly the lowest incidence of deaths of any country in the world from the flu. Nevertheless, the flu killed more Japanese than the Atomic Bombs did. Health authorities now believe the estimates of 50-million dead worldwide are too low. The USA lost over half a million. Worldwide, the flu killed more people in 25 weeks than AIDS has killed in 25 years.
It hit hard, and there probably wasn't a family that didn't feel its chill touch. Going through the cedar chest one day, I found a postcard in my grandmother's teenage handwriting. It said that the family had been to visit Emma (her little sister) in the hospital, that she seemed to be getting better and they hoped she would be home soon. She never did. I grew up visiting Aunt Emma's little grave.
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Old 04-22-2009, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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My mother was 9 then, and my dad was 18, but neither ever spoke about it.
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Old 04-23-2009, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Pocono Mts.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Walmsley View Post
There is much history that is either forgotten or overlooked. One is the tragic story of the 1782 Gnaddenhutten Massacre in Ohio. The backdrop to the story is that there had been several recent kidnappings and killings of white settlers in Pennsylvania. In retaliation, Captain David Williamson led a militia against a group of Christian Indians at the Moravian Church mission founded by David Zeisberger. Although the Moravian Indians declared their innocence in the attacks, Williamson had the Indians rounded up and separated by gender. The militia voted to execute the Indians the following morning. The Indians were informed of their impending fate and spent the evening singing hymns and praying. The next day twenty-eight men, twenty-nine women and thirty-nine children were executed. Two survived the slaughter and told their story to the Moravian missionaries and fellow Christian Indians. Gnaddenhutten is located in Tuscarawas County in eastern Ohio and is the oldest existing settlement in Ohio. A memorial was established to mark the event.

There must be many more bits of obscure history. I hope others will add more.
Pennsylvania and Ohio share much of the same history as far as the Moravians and the Christian Indians.

In the mid 1700's, the Moravian Church in Pennsylvania was very active in establishing Indian Stations, where the Delaware (Lenape) Indians were ministered to. Many Indians embraced the Moravian outreach, and were baptized as Christians. Even King Teedyuscung, Delaware chief, was baptized at Pennsylvania's Gnadenhutten, and there after called Gideon.
He did not adapt well to the Moravian ways...and he was under much pressure from the Six Nations to leave them. It was then that the massacres of white settelers began. Gideon left behind, Teedyuskung lead a band of angry Delaware Indians to take revenge on the settelers, and what he set his mind on to destroy...were the Indian Mission Stations.

In 1755, Gnadenhutten, Pa. was the sight of the first massacre, but unfortunately...it was not the last. There were attacks on several other stations as well.

One such attack was at the Site of Wechquetank. It is located in Gilbert, Pa....a few short miles from my home. This is the monument that the Moravian Church dedicated to those who lost their lives there.


The site was first attacked Dec. 10, 1755. The Hoeth Family, Heiss Family..and others were either killed or kidnapped on that fateful night. The homes, barns, mill and bakehouse all burned to the ground. In 1760, the Moravian's sought to again make the location a mission station, and rebuilt everything. Then in 1763, three of the Christian Indians were killed at a nearby Inn, and everything burned to the ground again. The was the last time a Moravian Indian Station existed at Wechquetank. I have always wondered why the monument leaves out the very important date of Dec. 10, 1755...

Sidenote: In 1756, Benjamen Franklin was appointed to design and build forts in my area, to protect the white settelers, and to protect the way to Philadelphia. The site of Fort Norris is just a few miles away from the site of Wechquetank.

Last edited by poconoproud; 04-23-2009 at 08:45 AM..
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Old 04-23-2009, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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This reminds me of the 1904 General Slocum steamship disaster in New York's East River. Over 1,000 people, mostly women and children, died as a result of the fire which engulfed the vessel.

"It was the second-most deadly fire (after the Peshtigo fire of 1871) and most deadly peacetime maritime disaster in American history."

General Slocum Disaster Remembered 1904-2004




Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyT View Post
Here are some bits of history that have largely been forgotten:

1. The loss of the S.S. Sultana: The Sultana was a Mississippi paddle wheel steamboat. She was one of number of such boats to be "hired" by the U.S. government to transport Union POW's that had recently been released due to the conclusion of the Civil War. The men, most of whom had spent time in the notorious Andersonville prison camp, were gathered at Vicksburg and were to be shipped up the Mississippi to Cairo, Illinois. Designed to legally carry 376 people, the Sultana left Vicksburg carrying 2,300 POW's, plus crew and other civilian passengers. The boat was so overloaded that the upper decks sagged from the excess weight. At 2 AM on April 27, 1865, approximately 7 miles north of Memphis, Tennessee, one of Sultana's boilers that had been improperly repaired while in Vicksburg, exploded. The explosion and the resulting fire that raged through the wooden steamboat sent it to the bottom of the Mississippi. An exact casualty figure is not known, but it is believed that over 1,700 people lost their lives in the tragedy. It still ranks as the worst maritime disaster in United States history. However, due to it happening so soon after the end of the Civil War and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, the story, then as now, receives little attention.
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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The Moravian Missions remained quite active in northern Canada, working with the Inuit right up to 1971. Dr. F. W. Peacock, the head of the Labrador Mission, became the world authority on the Inuit language.

As a personal aside, I studied the Inuit language under Dr. Peacock for two semesters, and learned the language enough ( just barely) that I translated Beatrix Potter's "Peter Rabbit" into Inuit. I learned many years later that my translation was still being used and reprinted in various Labrador Inuit school teaching materials. It was the first time any children's story had ever been rendered into the Inuit language and used as a teaching aid.

Last edited by jtur88; 04-23-2009 at 11:16 AM..
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Aloverton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
This reminds me of the 1904 General Slocum steamship disaster in New York's East River. Over 1,000 people, mostly women and children, died as a result of the fire which engulfed the vessel.

"It was the second-most deadly fire (after the Peshtigo fire of 1871) and most deadly peacetime maritime disaster in American history."

General Slocum Disaster Remembered 1904-2004
That one is indeed often forgotten. The real scandal was the utter carelessness of the crew (straw on the floor of the lamp-room where people are having their smokes? Good lord...) and the fact that the rottenness of the life-belts (the cork was reduced to powder that actually absorbed water) was matched only by the rottenness of the fire-hoses (they burst) and the inspection service that had certified Slocum's safety gear. In a world with any justice someone would have been waterboarded hourly for years to pay for that corruption.

Worse: it was a Sunday School outing of a bunch of German Lutherans, many women and children.
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Old 04-23-2009, 12:27 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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The Gen. Slocum disaster is depicted in a Clark Gable picture called Manhattan Melodrama. Which was the picture John Dillinger watched at the Biograph theater in Chicago just before he was murdered by the police as he left the theater.
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Old 04-23-2009, 12:31 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Originally Posted by j_k_k View Post
Worse: it was a Sunday School outing of a bunch of German Lutherans, many women and children.

This reminds me of the Eastland disaster in 1915. An excursion ship, the Eastland, rolled over in the Chicago River and 845 people were killed, many were Bohemians on a Western Electric company excursion.
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