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Old 01-09-2010, 12:24 PM
 
1,308 posts, read 2,642,635 times
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Its said that there were signficant problems on convoys, because sailers smoked which at night could be seen by wolf packs from long distances.
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Old 07-03-2013, 02:20 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,751 times
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Default Nonsense

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
When I was growing up in the 40s and 50s, I didn't know a single kid who had allergies or asthma, and there wasn't even a word for 'inner ear infection', even though almost every kid grew up in a house full of cigarette smoke.

We played outdoors, maybe that had something to do with it. Something is making our indoor environment toxic, but it must not be tobacco, because kids growing up now in tobacco-free houses have a much, much higher incidence of allergies and asthma than back when they played outdoors in the sunshine and walked to school when it was 20 below.

Maybe it's plastic. Nothing then was made of plastic, which is constantly giving off fumes, inside every house and building. Similar to what you get when you burn plastic, but slower. But the global economy would grind to a halt if we banned plastic.

This is nonsense. My mother was a smoker (she quit right after I was born), and she had all those allergy problems, and my sisters and I had all the other problems as well. I was still healthier than my poor cousins, both parents smoked, they were low birth weight, and took weekly shots because of the vast number of allergy related problems. One cousin was allergic to almost everything except for banana flakes and soy milk--yes, they had it in the sixties--for the first couple of years of his life. When my father quit smoking about 20 years ago, he began apologizing to everyone that he had ever smoked around. He quit because the doctors had to remove his nose--yes his nose. I have lost dear family members to the ravages of smoking, and it should not be taken lightly.

Smoking kills. It attacks every organ of the human body from your skin to your private parts. Maybe you will survive, but will your children and grandchildren? It isn't a life style choice: it is an addiction that was most likely developed during teenage years when peer pressure and self image are being developed.
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Old 07-04-2013, 05:27 PM
 
4,031 posts, read 5,638,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yinduffy View Post
Tobacco and smoking is prominent in many Civil War memoirs.
Historically, two of the earliest cigar smokers to die of throat cancer, were President / General Ulysses Grant, and psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.
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Old 07-04-2013, 05:32 PM
Status: "No longer very optimistic." (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
41,100 posts, read 50,857,717 times
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I was born in 1948. Both my parents smoked. All the kids in my generation can remember car rides with all the windows open and the cigarette ashes being flicked back into the back seat. The second hand smoke came back too.
In the 1960s, when I was in high school, there were mothers who were handing out little sample packs of cigarettes, to earn extra money, outside of the high school. There were smoking rooms in the high schools then too.
Can you imagine?
Fast forward to the early 1970s. In our circle of friends, we have pictures of cocktails and cigarettes at parties during our pregnancies. All of us had healthy kids, by the way.
My last child was born in 1983. During that pregnancy, the warnings had started to come out about cigarettes and alcohol.
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Old 07-04-2013, 05:47 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
31,353 posts, read 69,617,076 times
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Not just very common it was the norm.
Attached Thumbnails
How common was smoking in 30's,40's,50's??-moredoxsmokeluckies-notext-400x400.jpg  
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Old 07-04-2013, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,444 posts, read 25,467,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Not just very common it was the norm.
Non-smokers were treated as abnormal freaks.
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Old 07-05-2013, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Arizona
6,625 posts, read 6,222,250 times
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I can't think of a place you couldn't smoke back then, other than church.

In school and scouts we made ash trays for our fathers. I would like to see a teacher try that project now.
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Old 07-05-2013, 06:41 PM
Status: "Joy cometh in the morning" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
20,753 posts, read 26,011,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by averagejoe76 View Post
I watch alot of Film Noir and it seems like most of the people smoke..
Something you dont see often in recent film.
Did Tobacco companies pay for actors to smoke in films?
Or did the films reflect society at that time?
I don't remember much of the 1950s since I was born late in that decade, but I do remember the early 1960s.

Smoking was wildly preventible and it trancended social class. People smoked in supermarkets, movie theaters, and restaurants.

They smoked on talk shows and while reading the news. At school, if you passed the teacher's lounge, it reeked of some.

I think that the movies of the 1930s through 1950s depicted smoking as glamorous. This might have led to the people who were adults when I was growing up, who were raised on these movies, to view smoking as desirable or glamorous.

I have now doubt that the tobacco industry subsidized this.
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Old 07-05-2013, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 18,878,157 times
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Yep. There has been a real sea change in attitudes and practices. I was six years old in 1950, and smoking was the norm rather than the exception. My father and mother were among the exceptions, my father being midly allergic to cigarette smoke. When he hosted adult committee meetings for the Boy Scouts in our home, he opened all the windows in disgust following the departure of the last attendee. He would have liked to declare our home a non-smoking facility, but in that day it would have been considered too extreme. Too bad he was a generation too old to reap the benefits of the societal changes.

I remember the various steps. First, after much debate, non-smoking sections were set aside in airplanes and restaurants. Then later, after much further debate it was realized that way too much smoke drifted into those non-smoking sections and a smoking ban was institutued on airline flights and in restaurants (in the case of restaurants, it was first one state, then the next, and the next). Gradually somewhere along the line it became socially acceptable to ask people not to smoke in your car and/or your home. Then of course came workplace bans and we saw smokers huddled outdoors to satisfy their addictions, even shivering in cold weather.

Now (even as a non-smoker) I think the various outdoor bans have gone too far. Come on now, outdoors?
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Old 07-05-2013, 07:02 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
31,353 posts, read 69,617,076 times
Reputation: 37395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Now (even as a non-smoker) I think the various outdoor bans have gone too far.
Come on now, outdoors?
Going to a ball game just isn't the same without those smelly old man cigars.
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