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Old 08-24-2009, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Wichita,Kansas
2,731 posts, read 6,279,945 times
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I watch alot of Film Noir and it seems like most of the people smoke..
Something you dont see often in recent film.
Did Tobacco companies pay for actors to smoke in films?
Or did the films reflect society at that time?
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Old 08-24-2009, 02:50 PM
Status: "Vi må legge kortene på bordet nå." (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: 150 Years Too Late
13,338 posts, read 11,867,289 times
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I believe that the smoking rate prior to about 1960 was well above 50%. So the majority smoked at the time. Those old films did reflect society at the time (with regards to smoking). The demonization is a fairly recent thing. And no, I don't smoke.
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:30 PM
 
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My grandparents, in their 80's, say that everyone smoked back then.

Of course, they grew up in South Carolina tobacco country.
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 13,012,739 times
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It was ubiquitous. While not everyone smoked, smoking was the norm in offices, on aircraft, in restaurants, everywhere people went. Not until the 1970s did restrictions start to kick in at offices, on planes and so forth.
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Old 08-24-2009, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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In the 50s, I read in a sports magazine that there were only two players in major league baseball who did not smoke or drink----Richie Ashburn and Eddie Yost. They are my heroes, because I resolved at the time that I was going to be the third one. I never made the big leagues, but also never smoked, and I owe it to those two role models.

My dad smoked a pack of Camels a day, up until about that time. One day he was at work and ran out of smokes, and was going to run across the street to the store and buy some, and there was a raging blizzard outside and he couldn't even see across the street. So he went back to work and never smoked another cigarette in his life and lived to be 94.

There were certain places you couldn't smoke. Movie theaters was one of them. There would be an urn of sand in the lobby, smokers would douse their cigs in. People smoking something expensive like a cigar would poke the lighted end into the sand, and when leaving after the movie, identify their cigar and light it back up. I think anyplace that banned smoking, it was a fire issue. I can't remember my dad ever putting out his cigarette when the attendant was putting gas in the car.

There were a few admonishments about smoking, nevertheless. School teachers were encouraged not to smoke in public, I think. Boys that went out for school sports were told to give up smoking for the season, and remained fearful of getting caught and being cut from the squad. Even though big name stars made endorsement money smoking Chesterfields on billboards.

Last edited by jtur88; 08-24-2009 at 03:55 PM..
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Old 08-24-2009, 05:22 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
36,392 posts, read 46,954,704 times
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I've seen numbers that indicate up to 70% of adults smoked in the 1950s. Also, many TV shows were sponsored by cigarette companies. I have a film from the History Channel done several years ago about cigarette advertising that has commercial clips from various shows: I Love Lucy was Phillip Morris, Camel was big on several as was Lucky Strike, Winston was on The Flintstones and The Beverly Hillbillies, Kool was on Rawhide.
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:51 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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The original NBC 6 o'clock news with John Cameron Swayze was called "The Camel News Caravan" and sponsored by Camel cigarettes. Swayze could be seen smoking on the set. Ed Murrow chain-smoked through his entire full hour interview show, and by the end of the show, was almost invisible in the cloud of smoke. Producers filmed interview shows with flat black backgrounds, to intensify the visual effect of the smoke swirling in the klieglights.

Winston was the first "TV Cigarette"---a brand that came into existence because the TV medium was ideal for pitching cigarettes with catchy ad campaignss.

Tex Williams recorded the hit song "Smoke Smoke Smoke that Cigarette" in 1947.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn23zhBnb4A

Last edited by jtur88; 08-25-2009 at 01:15 AM..
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Old 08-25-2009, 01:35 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,876,438 times
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Both my parents were two pack a day smokers. They both died from related causes. The walls were yellow in our house and I didn't know that homes didn't smell like that if you didn't fill them with smoke. I also had major ashma and lots of ear infections. All the adults I knew smoked and we had candy cigretees to "share" with the adults.

The best thing that ever happened to a new generation of kids was when those who didn't smoke and didn't want to smoke passively found a voice. My son has very very mild ashma but has not grown up in a cloud of smoke. How much of my "allergies" were from mom and dad's addiction I'll never know.

The companies created these nice images to make people feel good about what they were doing. Remember the Marlbourl Man (who died of lung cancer)? It was promoted as sexy for women and masculine for men. Of course everyone smoked in the most provocative ways in the best movies.

When people complain that they are being denied the right to smoke because they have to go outside in the cold I point out that it is also my right NOT to smoke and their responsibility to insure it.
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Old 08-25-2009, 06:34 AM
 
742 posts, read 1,119,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
I believe that the smoking rate prior to about 1960 was well above 50%. So the majority smoked at the time. Those old films did reflect society at the time (with regards to smoking). The demonization is a fairly recent thing. And no, I don't smoke.
i wouldnt call it demonizing, id call it rising awarness
women used to drink when pregnant too, now we know better, id hardly call it demonizing to say you shouldnt drink when pregnant
same goes for cocaine
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Old 08-25-2009, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
I also had major ashma and lots of ear infections. All the adults I knew smoked and we had candy cigretees to "share" with the adults. . . . .
My son has very very mild ashma but has not grown up in a cloud of smoke. How much of my "allergies" were from mom and dad's addiction I'll never know.
.
When I was growing up in the 40s and 50s, I didn't know a single kid who had allergies or asthma, and there wasn't even a word for 'inner ear infection', even though almost every kid grew up in a house full of cigarette smoke.

We played outdoors, maybe that had something to do with it. Something is making our indoor environment toxic, but it must not be tobacco, because kids growing up now in tobacco-free houses have a much, much higher incidence of allergies and asthma than back when they played outdoors in the sunshine and walked to school when it was 20 below.

Maybe it's plastic. Nothing then was made of plastic, which is constantly giving off fumes, inside every house and building. Similar to what you get when you burn plastic, but slower. But the global economy would grind to a halt if we banned plastic.
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