U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 09-26-2009, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Arlington Virginia
4,538 posts, read 8,466,201 times
Reputation: 9721

Advertisements

My long time question has come back again, thanks to a reminder from another thread. I used to work for the Navy and wondered about this and never got a satisfactory answer. I thought it was because the difference between "ship" and "boat." A "boat" is a small vessel that can be carried aboard a "ship." Like whale boats, patrol boats, skiffs, etc. Originally submarines were small craft that were carried by and launched from ships. Today's submarines however are too large and would never be carried by any ship. I was on a pier once, discussing this issue with a Navy officer, as we looked at the 560 ft long Trident submarine in front of us. He said "It's as plain as the nose on your face. Just look!" Just then he was called away and I never got my question answered. I couldn't see what he said was so obvious Anyone know?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-26-2009, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
48,571 posts, read 20,546,255 times
Reputation: 20991
I don't know why everything on a ship or boat is called something different than it is called when the same thing is on land.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Midwest
5,158 posts, read 7,940,025 times
Reputation: 9625
WHY ARE THEY CALLED BOATS

SUBMARINE FACTS

BECAUSE.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 78,535,466 times
Reputation: 36332
Happily, language changes more slowly than the culture who uses it. "Dial" remains in use to describe the entering of a telephone number and the display on a watch, even though neither of them resembles a "dial". Submarines were called boats when they were boats, and as they gradually increased in size, nobody thought it necessary to point out that they had crossed a dimensional threshold and were now to be renamed ships.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 05:38 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
36,556 posts, read 47,169,410 times
Reputation: 47495
Because submariners (bubbleheads) march not only to a different drummer but to an entirely different band.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 06:45 AM
 
13,138 posts, read 37,930,256 times
Reputation: 12207
LOL, although i spent most of my navy years stationed at Mayport Naval Station and we had no submarines stationed there i never heard anyone refer to subs as boats . Just the Motor Whale Boats and the Captains Gig were addressed as boats that were attached to our ships.

QW, your not thinking about the U-Boats of WW2?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 10:20 AM
 
19,699 posts, read 59,585,832 times
Reputation: 36586
They go down to the sea in ships. They go down in the sea in boats.

The companies that made them were "electric boat" companies.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Arlington Virginia
4,538 posts, read 8,466,201 times
Reputation: 9721
Thanks all Yes I'm going to go with the "because that's what they've always called them" theory. I note that the most capable and knowledgeable man on the boat is "the cob" - as in "corn on the". C-O-B stands for Chief of the Boat. He stands above all the heads of the various departments such as engineering, navigation, nukes, communications, etc. The cob is knowledgeable about the operations of all the departments. I observed that the captain's primary requirement is to be "responsible" for everything, but I would think that the cob is the guy to go to if you need something done. Another uneducated observation: the crew seem to all be in their twenties, the cob stands out as he is in his thirties, and the captain is in his forties.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Midwest
5,158 posts, read 7,940,025 times
Reputation: 9625
Quote:
Originally Posted by quiet walker View Post
Thanks all Yes I'm going to go with the "because that's what they've always called them" theory. I note that the most capable and knowledgeable man on the boat is "the cob" - as in "corn on the". C-O-B stands for Chief of the Boat. He stands above all the heads of the various departments such as engineering, navigation, nukes, communications, etc. The cob is knowledgeable about the operations of all the departments. I observed that the captain's primary requirement is to be "responsible" for everything, but I would think that the cob is the guy to go to if you need something done. Another uneducated observation: the crew seem to all be in their twenties, the cob stands out as he is in his thirties, and the captain is in his forties.
For landlubbers, the COB is the equivalent of the first sergeant or sergeant major, the top enlisted member on board.

The CO and XO ultimately rule the roost, rank-wise, but much consultation typically goes along with the first sergeant, because often he's been around longer (and has deeper institutional knowledge and more relationships) than anyone else. Again, a lot depends on the personalities and politics involved. Other members in the formal or informal chain are often consulted.

A sub, I'd hazard, especially in the diesel boat days, is a very tight team effort. One error, all can die. That's not necessarily true for ground pounders.

The CO is where the buck stops, he's the one who will garner the top reward or top punishment for deeds good or bad.

The Chief, the Commander, and the XO are the three top dogs aboard, each has his unique role.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2009, 11:09 AM
Status: "Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast." (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,349 posts, read 20,049,117 times
Reputation: 36261
The distinction between a boat and a ship is modern and arbitrary. For example, in modern parlance a skiff is a boat but 'skiff' is essentially an archaic spelling of 'ship'.


ABQConvict
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > History

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top