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Old 08-27-2013, 08:56 AM
 
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dear posters I know I am a bit behind the times but I hope some of you pick this up
I live between the roman fort in mancetter and the roman camp 3 miles away protecting the site of pottery working
whilst there are no bones found on this site I am not surprised as the whole area has been
extensivley mined for roadstone . but I can confirm there has recently been dug up several romans in battle dress in the exact area of the battle there has also been a british chariot and burial dug up just outside the fort.
but this whole area floods really badly and the river moves about like a snake. allied to this a canal and a railway has been built straight through the site. The site which locals believe is where the brits are buried and the chariot has been found is OLDBURY intriguing huh
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Old 08-27-2013, 07:57 PM
 
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Yes. I figure the archaeologists should be doing some serious digging there! Who knows what lies beneath?


And as far as ancient battles and the bodies....You know you really didn't want to be on the losing side of a battle back in those days because your bones would rot and you'd just be the tell-tale of what could happen to the fellows who follow after you. You, as dead body, are a warning of 'this can happen to you'.

In 9 A.D., there was a battle in the Teutoberg Forest where Germanic tribes destroyed I believe 3 Roman legions. The bodies and bones hung out there at the battle site and were found by Roman troops following up on the terrible battle. No doubt what they saw (and imagined) made them cringe. And that was how Roman commanders were put to death when they were captured. In fact not to suffer that kind of fate, the commanding general did commit suicide. Gruesome business ancient battles.
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Old 08-27-2013, 08:38 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
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Originally Posted by travric View Post
.........In 9 A.D., there was a battle in the Teutoberg Forest where Germanic tribes destroyed I believe 3 Roman legions. The bodies and bones hung out there at the battle site and were found by Roman troops following up on the terrible battle. No doubt what they saw (and imagined) made them cringe. And that was how Roman commanders were put to death when they were captured. In fact not to suffer that kind of fate, the commanding general did commit suicide. Gruesome business ancient battles.
I was hoping someone would report this famous Roman loss. I often wonder how it must have been. The only real way to kill someone in those days was to make him bleed. Lots.

Julius Caesar was a bad a$$ in his own right as a general. He taught his men to go for the enemy's eyes. We're talking about a full time, professional Roman soldier who spends lots of time with his sword and spear. And in battle he is going for your eyes........(shudder).....
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Old 08-27-2013, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I was hoping someone would report this famous Roman loss. I often wonder how it must have been. The only real way to kill someone in those days was to make him bleed. Lots.

Julius Caesar was a bad a$$ in his own right as a general. He taught his men to go for the enemy's eyes. We're talking about a full time, professional Roman soldier who spends lots of time with his sword and spear. And in battle he is going for your eyes........(shudder).....
If you get the Weather Channel, check the listings for When Weather Changed History. There is one show which covers this battle, the tie in to weather how the rain bogged down the Romans into a trap. They also talk about how this stopped the Roman advance and influence into Germany, which influenced European history for hundreds of years.

The Romans were bloody but efficent which gave them an edge when the circumstances were there to fight. That battle they were bottled up in a swamp and their efficency was nill. But it did establish a hard line of culture which resonated in war after war after war as Rome chose not to try again.

War back then was pretty much horribly violent. Swords do extreme damage even if you can't shoot them. In reality, there were not many bodies, but hacked apart pieces. Blade warfare was personal and extreme and bloody for both victors and losers. The closest to showing it as a real battlefield was probably Braveheart and it was greately modified.

Most bodies or parts of bodies sunk into the mud and were left there.
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Old 08-28-2013, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
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Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
Julius Caesar was a bad a$$ in his own right as a general.
For sure, an example of which are the Gallic Wars 58-50 BC in which Caesar estimated 1,000,000 Gauls lost their lives, although this number is likely much too high. At the decisive Siege of Alesia 52 BC the Gallic losses may have been over 100,000 killed. Very bloody indeed, and where did all those bodies go?
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:07 AM
 
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Well we do know what happened to one and that's when Caesar captured Vercingetorix he shipped him off to Rome to die a cruel death. Both the gauls and Rome didn't fool around i guess when it came to prisoners. I'd think if one saw a loss coming up in a battle suicide probably was the better alternative. No quarter looked like it was the name of the game back then.

Same perhaps in our 'era'. Poster have noted the proud Zulu. To die on a battlefield facing the Zulu wasn't too pretty. You'd be slit up pretty bad. Because of the fact that the British didn't understand at the time that the Zulu did that from spiritual beliefs toward a fallen foe in battle and not because they had such lust to kill and disrespect the bodies of the dead British. In fact, both sides 'respected' the will to fight against each other. I'd think after Isandhlwana the British learned much about their enemy.
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Old 08-28-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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Originally Posted by BlackShoe View Post
For sure, an example of which are the Gallic Wars 58-50 BC in which Caesar estimated 1,000,000 Gauls lost their lives, although this number is likely much too high. At the decisive Siege of Alesia 52 BC the Gallic losses may have been over 100,000 killed. Very bloody indeed, and where did all those bodies go?
The thing with the Romans is that if conditions were not right for their tactics they could fail miserably, as they did with the first legion. Against the Gauls they worked well since typical Gualish tactics fed right into The Roman strategy.

The bodies might have been burned if someone was left behind to burn them, but likely sunk into the mud and fed the grasses.

The overall strategy of buriing the dead from a battlefield was born from the knowledge that the rot produced disease.
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Old 08-28-2013, 07:58 PM
 
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War back then was pretty much horribly violent. Swords do extreme damage even if you can't shoot them. In reality, there were not many bodies, but hacked apart pieces. Blade warfare was personal and extreme and bloody for both victors and losers. The closest to showing it as a real battlefield was probably Braveheart and it was greately modified
You know I think an ancient battlefield after a battle is probably more horrific than we can ever imagine. When great masses of soldiers die violent deaths resultng from being 'hacked apart', what happens is that they lose blood. Polybius , the Roman historian, noted that after Zama the battlefield was so soaked with blood that hardly anybody could move across it. And also it's interesting to note that Spartan soldiers sometimes wrote their names on the their shields to aid in identification if they were killed. It was like an ancient 'dog tag'.
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Old 08-28-2013, 11:10 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
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Originally Posted by travric View Post
You know I think an ancient battlefield after a battle is probably more horrific than we can ever imagine. When great masses of soldiers die violent deaths resultng from being 'hacked apart', what happens is that they lose blood. Polybius , the Roman historian, noted that after Zama the battlefield was so soaked with blood that hardly anybody could move across it. And also it's interesting to note that Spartan soldiers sometimes wrote their names on the their shields to aid in identification if they were killed. It was like an ancient 'dog tag'.
In naval history, sand was spread on the decks before battle so that the sailors would not slip in the blood. I was in the navy, and I can picture myself watching the crew spread sand.........
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Old 08-29-2013, 03:10 AM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
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Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
In naval history, sand was spread on the decks before battle so that the sailors would not slip in the blood. I was in the navy, and I can picture myself watching the crew spread sand.........

The British, at least, also painted the decks red so the blood wouldn't show.
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