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Old 05-21-2010, 08:27 PM
 
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How exactly was the government supposed to function? Did they think naming him king would cause the second coming? Was a bishop or cardinal supposed to act as regent? I remember this being mentioned in passing in Mexican history class I had once, and I started wondering about it tonight.
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Wrong Jesus. You're talking about Jesus Zambada Garcia, nicknamed "El Rey"---The King. Big man in the drug cartel, Currently in prison doing hard time.
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Old 05-22-2010, 03:24 PM
 
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lol I guessed that would be the case.
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Old 05-22-2010, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
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Besides, this was Mexico. If the real Jesus had become king, he would have been toppled by an angels coup six months after he was crowned.
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Old 05-22-2010, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX/Chicago, IL/Houston, TX/Washington, DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
How exactly was the government supposed to function? Did they think naming him king would cause the second coming? Was a bishop or cardinal supposed to act as regent? I remember this being mentioned in passing in Mexican history class I had once, and I started wondering about it tonight.
I think it has more political reasons than religious reasons, it could be to contain the public, to make sure they follow rules and regulations since after all "Jesus would be watching his kingdom".
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Old 05-23-2010, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Turn right at the stop sign
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What the poster is referring to is an event that took place in Mexico in 1923 during what has become known as the “Cristero” period, which marks a time of widespread and often brutal persecution of Catholics by the Mexican government from 1917 to 1929. The religious based, anti-government movement that sprung up during those years was a direct reaction to the Mexican Constitution of 1917 which contained within it several provisions meant to severely restrict the power and influence of the Catholic Church in Mexican society, especially political life. The constitution restricted, among other things, the number of men that could become priests, banned religious processions and any other public displays of worship that took place outside the confines of a church, and made churches property of the State.

One of the leading figures in the Cristero movement was Father Jose Maria Robles Hurtado. Shortly after becoming a priest, Father Hurtado established a religious order called the “Institute of Sisters Victims of the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus”. His religious writings as well as promoting the public worship of the Sacred Heart soon put Father Hurtado at odds with the Mexican government. In an act of defiance of the Constitution, Hurtado announced in 1923 that a ceremony would take place at a site known as “La Loma” which is roughly at the geographic center of Mexico. Here, upon a hill, the cornerstone of a giant cross would be laid down. Prior to the event, signs began to appear all over the country declaring that the building of the cross would serve as notice to all that Christ was “The King of Mexico”. This declaration was of course not literal but symbolic. It was designed to show the Mexican government that no matter how many laws were passed against Catholics, their devotion to the Church and desire for religious freedom would not be broken. As a means of demonstrating this fact, an estimated 40,000 Catholics traveled to “La Loma” to take part in the ceremony.

The large turnout angered Mexican officials and their persecution of the Church and its’ followers grew even stronger. By 1924, then President Plutarco Calles began enforcing the anti-Catholic laws with great zeal and went so far as to author more legislation intended to strengthen the Constitution of 1917 and its’ anti-Catholic components. The so-called “Calles Law” or “Law for Reforming the Penal Code”, which went into effect in June of 1926, set out specific penalties for any church member that defied the laws outlined in the Constitution. In response, the Catholic Church organized economic boycotts against the government and suspended public worship in Mexico until the law was rescinded, but this had little impact. Efforts by the Church to have the offending portions of the Constitution legally amended were met with hostility by the government and as punishment, many churches across the country were shut down.

On August 3, 1926, peaceful resistance ceased and armed conflict broke out as the Cristeros rebelled against the government in the city of Guadalajara. Violence began to spread throughout Mexico and the “Cristero War” was underway. Father Hurtado, who had gone into hiding, was declared an “Enemy of the State” and every effort was made to track him down and put an end to his “subversive” activities. This finally happened in June of 1927 when Hurtado was arrested by Mexican soldiers in the small town of Quila, in the state of Jalisco, and hanged. The Cristero War itself raged on for three years, with the Cristeros ultimately inflicting roughly 57,000 casualties upon Federal troops and at one point even controlling the entirety of Jalisco state.

Due to the efforts of the American ambassador to Mexico, Dwight Whitney Morrow, in co-ordination with Father John Burke of the National Catholic Welfare Conference and the Vatican, a peace agreement was finally brokered between the Cristeros and the Mexican government. All parties involved agreed that the “Calles Law” was to remain part of the penal code, but it and other anti-Church elements of the 1917 Constitution would no longer be enforced by Federal authorities. With that, the Cristero War formally ended on June 21, 1929.

Last edited by TonyT; 05-23-2010 at 03:15 AM..
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Old 05-24-2010, 07:29 PM
 
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That was very enlightening. It was not at all what I expected, but as I said I'd heard of it only in passing. That seems like something not too far from the old Liberal vs Conservative battles that ran through Latin America in the Nineteenth Century.
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Old 05-24-2010, 09:27 PM
 
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An interesting event from the war.

Quote:
The rebellion was given new life by the efforts of Victoriano RamĂ­rez, generally known as "El Catorce" (the fourteen). Legend has it the nickname originated because during jailbreak he killed all fourteen members of the posse sent after him. He then sent a message to the mayor—his uncle—telling him that in the future he should send more men.
lol

Cristero War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-26-2010, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Whiteville Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AuburnAL View Post
How exactly was the government supposed to function? Did they think naming him king would cause the second coming? Was a bishop or cardinal supposed to act as regent? I remember this being mentioned in passing in Mexican history class I had once, and I started wondering about it tonight.
Shouldnt you be pondering more important things? Like how to beat Alabama????????????
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