U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-28-2014, 08:25 PM
 
258 posts, read 587,604 times
Reputation: 76

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
I think it sounds nice because I like very open floor plans. In my new build, other than a small front entryway, with the coat closet and powder room, my entire main floor will be open - one big room with a living area, dining area and kitchen. So to me, opening up walls between rooms is a good thing, and makes the space feel larger, more open and integrated. And I think it's always great to increase natural light when you can.

As for visibility, that doesn't bother me, my whole first floor will be visible as you walk in the front door. Lots of people have front doors that open into a living room. I don't really see a concern with that, myself.

$2700 seems high to me, but since I don't know your location, it may be reasonable where you are.
I too have always loved open floor plans but somehow feel a little nervous about making these changes to a house. When you update a bathroom or a kitchen, there's a lot to show for it. Where as when you open up a wall ( a rather an opening in the wall ) in an already open floor plan, I imagine people will wonder what we were trying to do. We of course, were trying to bring in more light but they don't know that. Also, it is going to bring in some light in the family room but maybe not much in the kitchen. We are thinking of yet another window on the other side of the family room to bring in the morning sunlight into the family and to a lesser extent, the kitchen. It appears that the lack of volume ceilings contributes to the lack to daylight in our case - a south facing home. The two story foyer is always well light. We have a lot of trees in the backyard and planning to cut some. So, trying to see which option(s) will be the best in terms of cost and bringing maximum light into the house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-29-2014, 05:52 AM
 
323 posts, read 647,352 times
Reputation: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by tango14 View Post
I am not sure if it is load bearing. are there any cost implications one way or the other? If you paid 2800$ for the job, what do you think our job should amount to? Of course, other factors like the state/region matter but just to get an idea of what a reasonable estimate would be..thank you
You really need to know whether or not the wall is load bearing. Did the contractor that gave you the quote not mention this? A load bearing wall needs to be supported and braced much differently than a non load bearing and this will add significantly to the cost. If it's a non load bearing wall, just go at it with a sledge hammer and save yourself some bucks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2014, 02:36 AM
 
258 posts, read 587,604 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnlyWhnChasd View Post
You really need to know whether or not the wall is load bearing. Did the contractor that gave you the quote not mention this? A load bearing wall needs to be supported and braced much differently than a non load bearing and this will add significantly to the cost. If it's a non load bearing wall, just go at it with a sledge hammer and save yourself some bucks.
Wow...I wish I could do that and save some money but I wouldnt know where to start.😚 I had emailed the contractor the question and he is yet to respond. If it is a non load bearing wall, from what you say, it appears to be.a high quote. Although I have no idea what would be a reasonable quote for this job .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2014, 05:56 AM
 
Location: MA
675 posts, read 1,350,925 times
Reputation: 914
Voice of dissent here - I wouldn't. You already have the openness between the kitchen, family room, and den (curious: how is a family room different than a den?). Right now you have two symmetrical rooms that have more privacy - the layout makes sense, taking down another wall would throw the symmetry off and you'd lose the barrier you may want for privacy, noise, function, etc.

If it were me I'd put the money into trimming the trees and maybe adding another window - maybe a bay or greenhouse window or a large picture window - in the rooms that need more light.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Florida
23,501 posts, read 12,038,295 times
Reputation: 8927
Quote:
Originally Posted by tango14 View Post
We have a simple layout in our main level. Entry door leads to two story foyer and to a small living room on right, dining room on left. Go straight past the two and we have our family room which is open to the kitchen on one side and a den on the other side with French doors. So the kitchen, family room and den are all lined up, if you will. Cooking in the kitchen, I can see the den past the family room and French doors straight ahead. Here's the issue, we have very little natural light in our kitchen, family room because of direction, trees etc. we are looking at various options to work on this but one of the ideas is to create a opening, 6ft by 4ft , i think, between the dining room and family room. The foyer gets plenty of sunlight thoughout the day and the idea is to let this also filter into the family room and to a lesser extent , to the kitchen. But we are not sure if this is a good idea. If we did this, the living is the only one that is not open on the main level. Every other room is on a 'open floor plan'. Anybody at the front door, can get a peek right into the family room thru the opening, thus we are giving up privacy. Not, sure with the new opening, will the family room look smaller? Also, when we sell, hopefully not for a long time now, will this renovation act against us? Do people in general, prefer this degree of openness? Sorry for the long post but on the horns of a dilemma and seeking some ideas, opinions? thanks..
Opened concept came in big when there was a sheet rock shortage in the 2000's because of the building boom...and it caught on. Now many people look at the opened concept as desirable.. I like to have a little privacy when the front door is opened .

I have opened concept in Florida but not in NJ..it's an older home and I am fine with the rooms with walls, but the home in Florida has a long foyer before one sees the opened concept - large room .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2014, 08:48 PM
 
258 posts, read 587,604 times
Reputation: 76
After much thought, we are planning to go ahead with the idea of making an opening in the wall. We had two contractors come in - it appears it is a load bearing wall ( the stairs lead up to the top floor at where this wall is) or at least two load bearing posts on either end ( it was hard to get the contractors to give a firm idea about this ) . So, obviously something has to be done to redistribute the load. One of them had this in his quote :


Open 10’ space between dining room and living room,
Knee wall 40” H ,
Fix drywall
Haul trash And clean up
Material and labour

The other quote went like this :

12 lvl header,
Framing materials, drywall, fasteners, paint, casement, remove approx 5X10 area in dining room wall to create cutout, make and install header, framing as needed, install casement to finish, caulk and paint

The second quote charges 1500$ more than the first quote. So not sure what to make of all this. Can a knee wall redistribute the weight as mentioned in the first quote? Any thoughts? We are not sure if we should call in a structural engineer or will a good contractor be able to evaluate the situation structurally? Thank you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2014, 10:33 AM
 
3,763 posts, read 10,988,836 times
Reputation: 6760
The second quote is a lot more specific --

they're using a 12 foot LVL (laminated veneer lumber) beam to support the load of the 2nd floor across the new opening.

Basically because they are removing vertical structural (load bearing) framing in that opening, they have to use another beam horizontally to span the opening and redistibute the load properly to the studs on either side of the opening.

If this is not done appropriately, you could have your ceiling (2nd floor) start to sag.

Am I correct that you are only having a "window" (an opening above a knee wall) put in, and not an actual walk-way type opening?

I think a walk-thru opening woud perhaps be more desirable than just a see-through opening, but, to each their own.

The second quote also includes casement (trimming out the opening so that it looks "finished") whereas the first quote only talks about finishing the drywall. (i.e. it will be a non-cased opening).

Cased usually looks a bit more formal, where as non-cased openings usually appear more modern (to me).

So the 2nd quote gives a little more information about what they're doing.

As far as the kneewall (highlighted in the first quote) - that really won't do anything to support the load of the structure above, but is just the wall below the opening. Since its simply aesthetic, that's why I was surprised - when i read your intial post I thought you were talking about an opening that would let light in, but that could also be walked through.

Essentially you're creating a pass through (that's what they call the window-type openings between kitchen and adjoining room -- allows the cook to PASS the food through, but does not allow you to walk through).

Good luck on your decisions!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Madison, AL
1,614 posts, read 1,818,804 times
Reputation: 1638
Based on your description of the layout etc., I think I'd do a true cased-opening doorway and not just a window or pass-through. I think it would look better, make more sense, and what would you do with a knee wall anyway? Just my opinion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2014, 09:09 PM
 
258 posts, read 587,604 times
Reputation: 76
Thanks for your inputs. As it turns out we have to abort the project. We called in the contractor with the low quote to discuss further details of what he would do and it turned out that this wall is the conduit for gas pipes to the furnace in the attic and water pipe to the laundry upstairs. With a finished basement, there is not much accessibility to locate and manouvrer these pipes and the project would become too large. So we are leaving it alone. We don't many other effective options to bring light in, so there goes. Anyways, I guess we are glad we found out before we let them take the sledge hammer to the wall. I wonder what the Guy with the higher quote would have done when he would have encountered the pipes. Charged us more and more. Goes to show how these contractors are not very reliable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2014, 06:23 AM
 
3,763 posts, read 10,988,836 times
Reputation: 6760
If you can't bring in actual daylight - you can always do cosmetic things like paint the walls a light color, and/or put in additional ceiling fixtures (can lights or something similar) to provide additional light.

I'm sure the utilities could be moved, but you're right - that would likely increase the cost of the project substantially.

Good thing you found out now!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top