U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-07-2014, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,284 posts, read 19,722,248 times
Reputation: 9487

Advertisements

Thanks for the link, nuts2uiam, they have a lot of nifty pictures and ideas there.

Hopes, I'm pretty sure the current termite eaten ceiling in there is a replacement ceiling. I'd love to replace it with what was probably the original ceiling type which would have been canec, but they don't make canec anymore. Canec was made of sugar cane bagass (the left over stalks after they've had the juice squished out of them) mixed with arsenic and then flattened and dried in big sheets. It has a flat textured look and is really light. Which is probably why the framing up there is so minimal, with canec you'd not need it. But canec hasn't been made for years not to mention the arsenic issue. Replacing the plywood ceiling with another plywood ceiling seems like a good way to keep feeding the termites. They didn't eat the rest of the structure since it was redwood (at least, I think that's what's under all that paint). We will termite treat the house, but that doesn't always get them all.

South Jersey Styx, this was just chatting with a carpenter friend, he's not a contractor and it was just chatting, he isn't expecting to give a bid on the project. There may not be any bids, most of this will be DIY, although we may rope in a few miscellaneous warm bodies for various bits of the project. He may pop over and help for free, though, but we'd not ask him to. He's been a carpenter for years so he's had a lot of experience in all types of house construction and renovation. We won't have a contractor for the ceiling since a contractor isn't necessary when replacing an existing bit to a house. Except for the electrical and plumbing, though, that requires a licensed person in Hawaii. To repair this house with a contractor would be way more cost than the value of the house most likely.

Installing extra beams wouldn't be very feasible since the house is "single wall". The walls are made of vertical 1" x 8" T & G boards. That's it. No studs, siding, paneling, nothing. Just a vertical board. One side of the board is what you see from the exterior of the house, the other side of the board is what you see from the interior of the house. Single wall construction works in Hawaii since we don't usually have heating or air conditioning in our houses. So, since it's single wall construction, that means there's nothing to hold the beams up unless posts were added under the ends of the beams and then the posts would need to be supported so that would mean new footings under the house as well. Currently, the roof is 2" x 4" trusses 4' o.c. with 2" x 2" blocking @ 24" o.c. face nailed between the trusses at the bottom for ceiling support. There's 2" x 3" purlins @ 2' o.c. (might be 3' o.c.) on the top of the trusses. Corrugated metal roofing is nailed to the purlins. That's it and is actually a very standard roof construction method in Hawaii up until the mid eighties. Folks still build them that way, but they put the trusses closer together as well as the purlins.

This picture is the top side of the plywood ceiling that you can see in the attic. There seems to be some surface damage of some sort to some of the trusses & rafters, perhaps rat damage? I didn't see many termites in the trusses and rafters, though, they were mostly in the plywood ceiling.



The existing termite eaten ceiling is plywood, I've not measured, but I'm guessing half inch ply. I'd guess it's about ten to twenty percent eaten by termites with big holes in it. Some areas have more damage than others, but I think there's enough plywood up there to hold up some of the 2' x 2' ceiling tiles. There is a lot of damage that doesn't show in the picture since once you get up to knocking on the board to see if it is sound, there will be areas where the termites ate up to the paint but didn't eat through the paint.



That's the other side of the plywood ceiling that you see from inside the house. It's all over the place. If you see a pile of termite droppings on the floor or counter, you can figure the ceiling above has termite damage. Fortunately, it seems mostly in the ceiling, but we've not been able to thoroughly check out the rest of the structure yet.

They make ceiling tiles out of plastic, which wouldn't weigh much nor feed the termites:

Amazon.com - Decorative R-7 Pack of 4 Tiles Ceiling Tiles 20"x20" 1/8" Starofoam Glue Existing Popcorn - Water Resistant Suspended Ceiling Tile



Those particular tiles have a very "50's" feel to them, although I don't know if we would actually use them. A whole ceiling grid with these bubbles in the middle of it might look too interesting.

There's a lot of different colors and styles of the ceiling tiles, if those could be glued onto the plywood after we clear away all the loose paint and termite eaten bits, that would make for a much easier and a whole lot less expensive repair than replacing joists and trusses. We could also do different ceiling treatments for different rooms. I could see something like this in the kitchen if we were doing aqua / white / teal / copper :



This one might be nice in the living room, or perhaps for the whole house:

Armstrong Pinehurst Homestyle Ceiling Tile



This one would be a hoot for the bath:



But they mention it will rust unless it is sealed. We have too much humidity for it, but if they made it in plastic, I'd really consider it in the bath.

Last edited by hotzcatz; 09-07-2014 at 02:42 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-07-2014, 03:02 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 94,975,217 times
Reputation: 30461
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Replacing the plywood ceiling with another plywood ceiling seems like a good way to keep feeding the termites. They didn't eat the rest of the structure since it was redwood (at least, I think that's what's under all that paint). We will termite treat the house, but that doesn't always get them all.
Was the roof leaking?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2014, 05:59 PM
 
3,403 posts, read 4,719,617 times
Reputation: 5353
Too bad the dolphins would rust they are fun, couldn't you seal it maybe? but it would wear off sooner or later and rust in the humidity.

Yes that single wall construction is something most people are not familiar with, and keep mentioning drywall. Of course that would be nice, but quite an extra cost to frame it up to accommodate drywall, but why bother. The drop ceiling would be fine if you remove the ceiling there now then it wouldn't be any lower. And what a nice place for the gecko!

So is a new roof coming now as well or are you keeping the metal roof? If it is going to be replaced you might look into the vault ceiling and have it be open like this
http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/73...bfe29b2dc8.jpg

You can have your countertops made any size but it does cost extra and adds up quick when you deviate from standard size 25.5" depth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2014, 01:47 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,284 posts, read 19,722,248 times
Reputation: 9487
I don't know if the roof leaks or not. There are a few (two or maybe three) places that look like there may have been some leaks, but not very big ones from the looks of it. We will patch any leaks and possibly paint the whole roof with some sort of roof coating. It's a metal roof, new sheets of tin roof can be added in if necessary but it doesn't look that bad.

Yeah, the dolphins are really cute, but unfinished metal just doesn't survive well around here. I could get a few of them, spray them with Ospho and then paint them with some sort of enamel paint and then they'd only need to be replaced in a couple of years instead of immediately, I'd guess. I like projects that stay done, though. If they made them in plastic or polystyrene or something that wouldn't rust, then we could use them.

Geckos would love a drop ceiling! But they will have to tough it out and hang on the walls instead. The ceiling tiles look like they could be glued right up to the existing plywood ceiling, so I'm thinking that may be the way to go. Saves the cost and bother of installing a grid/rail system, too. We will probably be able to replace the whole ceiling for about $1,500 to $2K. That's just clearing all loose stuff off the existing plywood ceiling and then staple/nail/glue the ceiling tiles up there so it should cost just about materials cost. I'm thinking something along the line of the white Armstrong tile will probably be what ends up there. Either 12" x 12" or 24" x 24" tiles, not the 2' x 4' rectangles since that would look like an office building.

We call those ceilings "open beam" ceilings instead of "vault", but we aren't going to do anything tricky with the ceiling or roof. Altering single wall houses can be "interesting" since each part sort of holds up the next. Even the trim can be "structural" in some of them. Those horizontal bands on the outside of the house are structural as well as decorative.

Nah, no need for new countertops. It looks like these cabinets were built in place so putting new tops on them would probably destroy them. Plus we don't really need new ones, just resurface the ones that are there. I will probably add a small extension along the front edge and then put the new laminate on top of that and then put the metal trim back on. That will keep spills from hitting the face of the cabinet and won't be that hard to do. Just take the metal trim off, if the existing laminate is solid, it can stay and just get a new layer put on top. I'll see what lumber we have laying about and probably rip a 2" x 2" to fit and then glue and screw that to the front edge of the existing counter top. Then cover with laminate and you'd never know it was added. Well, except for the 1" or 1.5" gap at the back of the metal trim, but I can do something to fix that. I'll figure it out when it gets to that point.

Hmm, termite tenting = $3,000
Electrical repair = $1,500
Plumbing repair = $1.500
Water heater = $500
New ceiling = $2,000
Paint = $600
Formica = $600
Flooring = ??
Miscellaneous = $500

So, I guess our expenses are going to be around $10K. If we added in flooring, that would up it by several thousand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-08-2014, 05:14 PM
 
3,403 posts, read 4,719,617 times
Reputation: 5353
$10,000 is not bad for the total redo. Is there another one nearby I could get?

So you are going to put the Formica over the existing countertop and extend it out 2", that seems like a good plan. Don't you need a grid of some sort to go over all the edges of the ceiling tile? I don't know how nice that would look without it...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,284 posts, read 19,722,248 times
Reputation: 9487
The only reason that redo budget is so low is because we will be doing as much of the work ourselves, it's almost a "materials only" budget. It's also going to be a fairly long drawn out renovation, we will probably be at it for a year or so, maybe more if we include landscaping.

The ceiling tiles are supposed to be tongue and groove, at least according to the website they are advertised on, and just stick to the ceiling with glue, nails, staples or any other method we can think of. Some styles of the tiles need the metal grids, others are okay with out the grid. We will get the type without the metal grid.

There are a few other fixer-uppers around. Honokaa-Waipio house This is another "fixer-upper" although I've not looked at it. It's a pink house, though. This should be it's real estate listing: Pink House It's about a mile outside of town towards Waipio look out.

This house may be older than I knew. The tax office says it's from 1952, but there's a picture hanging in the post office from the early 40's that shows the house in it. I'll have to take a picture of the picture and ask around to see if anyone knows more about it. One of the nice things about living in small towns is you can find out stories. Maybe we will have to do a 40's kitchen, instead! I haven't a clue about 40's kitchens or decor.

And! Instead of it being twenty years ago that it's people left, it's said that it was twenty seven years ago that they left. I still don't know why they left, though.

Last edited by hotzcatz; 09-09-2014 at 03:57 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 07:58 PM
 
3,403 posts, read 4,719,617 times
Reputation: 5353
Looks like a nice area, I took a google "walk" through the neighborhood.

I'm wonder if glueing the ceiling tiles would be successful long term with the humidity there. Maybe nails or staples would be good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Candy Kingdom
3,249 posts, read 2,976,836 times
Reputation: 5228
Why was the house abandoned for 20 years?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2014, 08:31 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 94,975,217 times
Reputation: 30461
Different ceilings in different rooms will make the house feel smaller. It's best to have some basic elements tying all rooms together. I consider the ceiling to be one of those elements.

There are specific types of glue/adhesives that can withstand high heat and high humidity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2014, 04:33 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,284 posts, read 19,722,248 times
Reputation: 9487
I'll keep that in mind, Hopes, when putting up the ceiling tiles. I was thinking different tiles for different rooms would make more of a differentiation between the spaces. Some of the tile patterns have a larger and a smaller version. We could use one of those, perhaps? Put the big version in the larger spaces and the smaller version in the smaller spaces?

The whole house is about 1,000 square feet and it has three bedrooms and one bath. The kitchen has an eat in dining area so no separate dining room. It's basically the kitchen, living room, hallway, three bedrooms, one bath and closets in the bedrooms and bath. I don't think I saw any hall closets.

Google walking is always fun, Kayekaye. Although in Google land, the neighbors house is a bleah light blue. It is now a dark brown with green trim and they have some more landscaping. Google shows bigger ti plants in front of our house, apparently, they trimmed them way back to sell it. Not that it matters, ti grows pretty quick. There are a lot of areas that Google hasn't gone and yet our street where we live now has been Googled twice already.

I don't know why they would have left, jessxwrites89. If it had merely been twenty years ago, then I would have thought it to be connected to the demise of the sugar industry in this area. However, that was only twenty years ago and they were supposed to have left twenty seven years ago. So that was a long time before sugar left. What was happening in 1987 that would be a reason for folks to leave this area? That's also a long time to pay taxes on a house and not live in it. But it's also a long time for a structure to stand empty and not be vandalized. I'm taking the lack of vandals in that long of a time frame to be an excellent neighborhood reference. I've asked a couple folks who live in the area and they really like it there.

I asked one of the guys at the Knick-Knackery and he showed me some advertisements from the 40's. Nice rounded shapes, sort of darker colors is what was in the advertisement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top