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Old 10-11-2014, 08:55 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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We are now pondering what to do for the kitchen floor. We are considering a brick floor but have never met anyone who has one. We have cream beadboard and glass cabinets and Santa Celia granite. Thoughts?

Also, has anyone heard of something called portstone?
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:02 AM
 
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my neighbor had a brick floor put into her kitchen and eating nook. it was beautiful. she had it very slightly distressed.
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now Rehoboth Beach, DE
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If you are speaking about real brick, personally, I love the look but would not do it. The uneven surface would be a killer on furniture and chipping the brick with table and chair legs. It would be next to impossible to clean and it is porous so stains would set pretty quickly.
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Real brick, just like natural stone like travertine, can be sealed.
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:18 AM
 
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Sounds really cool! I think it would be terrific if you could get it in a "color" similar to or that wouldn't clash with your beadboard, cabinets, and granite.
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Just go to Williamsburg, VA and you can find all sorts of 200 plus year old kitchens with 200 plus year old brick floors. Very durable. Just be sure to have them sealed.

I think they would look GREAT in either an industrial look or an antique look kitchen.
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Old 10-11-2014, 11:42 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Just go to Williamsburg, VA and you can find all sorts of 200 plus year old kitchens with 200 plus year old brick floors. Very durable. Just be sure to have them sealed.

I think they would look GREAT in either an industrial look or an antique look kitchen.
We are definitely aiming for the old look. I've seen the 200+ year ones and love the worn look. I am a little concerned about how that would translate in the newer materials.
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Old 10-11-2014, 01:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
We are now pondering what to do for the kitchen floor. We are considering a brick floor but have never met anyone who has one. We have cream beadboard and glass cabinets and Santa Celia granite. Thoughts?

Also, has anyone heard of something called portstone?

Brick is a warm, durable, low maintenance material which has a distinct personality that can give your kitchen a unique flavor. It provides you with many of the characteristics of natural stone, including a strong hard surface that is long lasting and tough to damage. However it also presents a number of concerns in the kitchen, and may not be suitable for all applications.

How Comfortable Is a Brick Kitchen Floor

Warmth: Brick has a naturally warm and inviting feeling, that comes not only from the rich colors that adorn its surface, but also from the fact that it tends to retain heat. That means that if you sneak barefoot into the kitchen on a cold winter morning you won't have to worry about freezing your toes off.

Hardness: While the strength and durability of brick can be wonderful as far as maintaining a long term investment, it can also be murder on your feet and legs, especially when you are cooking big, complicated family meals. The hardness of the floor can also be a problem when bending down or kneeling to get objects from low under counter shelves and cabinets.

A great way to offset this drawback is by placing rugs strategically through the kitchen. Make sure to position them in places where you do the most standing and kneeling, such as in front of the sink, or an often used counter area.
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Old 10-11-2014, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
We are definitely aiming for the old look. I've seen the 200+ year ones and love the worn look. I am a little concerned about how that would translate in the newer materials.
My understanding is that you can get an aged look in brick.

You may also consider travertine. We're putting that down right now in our kitchen (also going for the vintage look - sort of a Downton Abbey downstairs kitchen look), and here it is right now - not sealed or grouted. It's in the Versailles pattern. Not terribly expensive (laying it and the extra adhesive required adds to the cost a little - the pattern is complex), but as soon as my daughter walked in she said, "Oh wow, Mom - IT LOOKS LIKE THE FLOOR OF AN ANCIENT CASTLE OR CATHEDRAL!" BINGO!



We're going with painted cabinets too, and soapstone counter tops. Old World country, sort of turn of the 20th century is what we're aiming for.

But aged brick sounds absolutely gorgeous.
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Old 10-11-2014, 07:06 PM
 
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I agree that it can be murder on your legs and feet. I rented a vacation home with it for a month. After the first couple days I couldn't take my tennis shoes off anymore when in the kitchen. It was very hard to stand in.
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