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Old 11-03-2014, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Florida
23,501 posts, read 12,038,295 times
Reputation: 8927

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I like walls.. I have a home in NJ that has walls and the den is the largest room in the back of the house and has a door I can close from the rest of the house.

I bought a home in Florida and most of the homes in Fl are open concept . I bought a home there that has a hallway that leads to the open concept. If someone looks in , they see the hallway and a formal dining table I seldom use.

When entering the dining room I have an open concept large room, no walls, that has a large great room, kitchen, long breakfast counter and a large lanai that is recessed partially into the back of the home .. It is mostly glass windows and two slider glass doors that are in the back.. the guest rooms are set in the front of the house and the master bedroom suite is the whole right side of the home. I bought the empty lot in the back so no one builds there and I can keep my privacy. I like privacy and walls.
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Old 11-03-2014, 07:42 PM
 
265 posts, read 278,503 times
Reputation: 980
The oddest wall removal I've seen is homes with no bathroom wall - except for the commode. I mean - who wants the shower in their bedroom? To me, that's open concept gone amok.
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Old 11-04-2014, 09:34 AM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,223 posts, read 8,043,400 times
Reputation: 9928
^^^

That and and having an open area to easily see the vanity and sinks in a bathroom from a bedroom is something that I can't stand.

Even for someone like me who has nearly clear and very tidy counters in the bathroom, much less for the all-to-common array of cluttered beauty, personal care, decorative and cleaning products that inhabit so many vanity counters. That would drive me crazy to have to look at that from a bedroom.

Give me walls and doors.
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Old 11-04-2014, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts & Hilton Head, SC
7,988 posts, read 12,042,705 times
Reputation: 6396
I can't stand open concept homes. We've been looking to buy a 2nd home in SC and went looking with a realtor last month & saw 7 or 8 homes. He looked at my face after we saw the 1st couple and he said, "You don't like that open look, do you?" LOL, I guess he must have had other clients that had the same reaction.

And what's with these houses where you open the front door and step right into the dining room?
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Old 11-04-2014, 11:29 AM
 
3,763 posts, read 10,988,836 times
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I like semi-open, which is what I have (home built in 2008) currently and what I grew up in (home built in '50s.)

Very minimal hallways, most rooms open into other rooms (no dead ends in "public" rooms).

Center-entry foyer (living room to left, opening to dinin room behind) with center stairwell. (office to right - rare dead end on first floor). Walking path of foyer is to the right of stairs, opens up to kitchen (behind stairwell, next to dining room) and Family room.

Basically a big circle of: foyer:living:dining:kitchen:Family:foyer:etc...

My parents home was similar (foyer:living:dining:kitchen:family:den:tiny hall:living) - with the rooms being much smaller and the foyer being a 4x4 "step dow" from the living room (with a "divider" to block the view straight into the dining room).

A friend had a newer construction (late 90s, early '00s) that was "open concept". You walked into the living room (not even a square of slate on the floor to demarcate the entry) and were staring at a 300/400 sq foot "great" room of kitchen/dining/living. But really just a huge space, no walls, no architectural notes. Just like a warehouse with a sofa and a kitchen island.

It was interesting, and it suited her, but it definitely would not have been to my taste.
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Old 11-04-2014, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Madison, AL
1,614 posts, read 1,818,804 times
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This picture is from a very pricey home in an upscale neighborhood in my town. It was taken from the fireplace looking toward the front door. This layout/design has become very VERY common in this area, at every price point. You see what I mean about the "formal" dining room just having 1 wall to place furniture on. the other wall is a window, and then you just have columns defining the space. If the columns weren't there, you would just have a big open bowling alley of a room. You can see part of the kitchen to the right of this room (space for refrigerator). The kitchen has no walls at all....just a long island with seating, and there's another area for a breakfast table. The doorway to the left of the front door is a guest suite. the master bedroom is behind the kitchen. There are 2 more bedrooms and a HUGE (size of the 3 car garage) bonus room upstairs. Where are the stairs? you might ask. They are in a back hallway off the mudroom You can see a doorway to the right of the refrigerator cubby. That leads to the huge mudroom and the stairs are tucked back there. This is the ONLY staircase in the house. It should be a lot of fun to negotiate those twists & turns in the hallway/staircase with a big dresser!

so you have a huge open room on the first floor, and a huge bonus room upstairs. No room for a library, or a small cozy den. and don't even get me started on painting! if you want to paint the living room a different color, well you have to paing the kitchen and the foyer and the dining room too!

I like a certain degree of open concept but this is too much for my taste. And surprise....this home is still on the market. This is a builder's spec home and he's built & sold many of his more traditional floorplans in this neighborhood while this house sits & sits.

am I the ONLY one who doesn't like.....-another-bowling-alley.jpg
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Old 11-04-2014, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Madison, AL
1,614 posts, read 1,818,804 times
Reputation: 1638
forgot to add.... the home I picture in post above, it's in the top 10% of home prices in this area. For that price, I would want some WOW factor. This house has none. Nice wood floors, yes. nice front doors, and the fireplace is nice. Nice materials used in kitchen & baths. But nothing that says WOW. At that price, I would want some WOW.
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Old 11-04-2014, 09:04 PM
 
861 posts, read 1,156,098 times
Reputation: 783
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merc63 View Post
I don't think this is an HGTV thing at all. A LOT of older homes, especially ranchers and cape cods and the like, had front doors that opened up directly into the living room with the dining room right there, so would end up with the same situation the OP describes. I once lived in a 1950s cottage house that had the front door open into the living room/dining room combo area. it was a small house and that's just the way they were built, LONG before there was any HGTV in existence.

Who are these people that youre worried about "getting up in your business" by seeing through the front door to a messy house?
My house was built this way! I bought what I could afford at the time. It's a raised ranch in Chicago and had been updated with granite counters and such. Not a large home at 1000 square ft but, we love it!
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Old 11-05-2014, 07:30 AM
 
4,881 posts, read 5,082,835 times
Reputation: 7358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
I hate the open concept. HATE it. When we were last house shopping I told the realtor no open concept. He looked at me like I was crazy and said that everyone wants open concept. No, everyone doesn't.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Runuova View Post
My house was built this way! I bought what I could afford at the time. It's a raised ranch in Chicago and had been updated with granite counters and such. Not a large home at 1000 square ft but, we love it!
Ditto. Although I may think outside the box, I prefer to have a home with the box-like rooms for many
reasons. I remember when we were looking at lofts (for fun) in the 90's and everything was open
concept with granite at that time too. They were a new idea then, but 15-20 years later, the design
has become a standard in many (not all) home construction as well as apartments. Thought I'd post
a home for sale by a well known author. Many buildings like this were apartments for 2 families. I give
her credit for preserving it's original charm. Here are the box-like rooms and to buy this property
would cost 750k. (I think it needs curtains for privacy)

Click on building photo for more pics
Buy Author Gillian Flynn

Last edited by baileyvpotter; 11-05-2014 at 08:02 AM.. Reason: erroor
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Old 11-05-2014, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,521 posts, read 27,047,744 times
Reputation: 88586
Quote:
Originally Posted by moon2 View Post
The oddest wall removal I've seen is homes with no bathroom wall - except for the commode. I mean - who wants the shower in their bedroom? To me, that's open concept gone amok.
I've seen some homes from the 70's that had the vanities in the bedrooms…also a few with the sunken tubs in the master bedroom. Those are awful….and forget about a closet for clothes that is inside your bathroom. What a mess with the humidity a bathroom causes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by baileyvpotter View Post
Ditto. Although I may think outside the box, I prefer to have a home with the box-like rooms for many
reasons. I remember when we were looking at lofts (for fun) in the 90's and everything was open
concept with granite at that time too. They were a new idea then, but 15-20 years later, the design
has become a standard in many (not all) home construction as well as apartments. Thought I'd post
a home for sale by a well known author. Many buildings like this were apartments for 2 families. I give
her credit for preserving it's original charm. Here are the box-like rooms and to buy this property
would cost 750k. (I think it needs curtains for privacy)

Click on building photo for more pics
Buy Author Gillian Flynn
Just goes to show we are all very different. While I can admire the workmanship and wood work, that place is just awful to me…too dark, dreary and boxy.
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