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Old 11-13-2014, 09:06 AM
 
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Hi folks,

What's the latest on concrete countertops in terms of resistance to staining, maintenance, and permeability? I'm attracted to that option as a means to create a more uniform look, as opposed to the erratic patterns usually associated with granite (I'll have hickory floors, while select grade, do tend to be somewhat busy, so I'm concerned about too much visual "noise" in the kitchen). I really like the recycled glass and quartz options as well, but they are quite a bit more expensive than granite, and my contractor thinks he can do concrete himself at a comparable price to granite.

Regarding whether concrete is suitable for kitchen use because of permeability, my understanding is that it is sealed in similar ways to granite to prevent staining -- is that accurate?

Thanks for any input.
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Old 11-13-2014, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Berkeley, Denver, CO USA
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Do NOT have your "contractor thinks he can do concrete himself".
Concrete countertops require a specialist. And, there are not many of them.
The concrete is different. The tolerances are tighter.

Go with engineered quartz.
Plain styles abound.
Not porous.
Lots of installers.
Better for resale (if you care).
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Old 11-13-2014, 12:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Do NOT have your "contractor thinks he can do concrete himself".
Concrete countertops require a specialist. And, there are not many of them.
The concrete is different. The tolerances are tighter.

Go with engineered quartz.
Plain styles abound.
Not porous.
Lots of installers.
Better for resale (if you care).
Thanks Dave. I've seen a bunch of DIY videos on youtube. No go, eh?

Quartz would be nice, but cost prohibitive.
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Old 11-13-2014, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,634 posts, read 40,078,766 times
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You could consider soapstone. It's not particularly expensive, and has a finish that's more like concrete in that it's not shiny and super smooth. Impervious to heat or acidity and doesn't even have to be sealed.
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Old 11-13-2014, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Meggett, SC
10,780 posts, read 9,413,628 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
You could consider soapstone. It's not particularly expensive, and has a finish that's more like concrete in that it's not shiny and super smooth. Impervious to heat or acidity and doesn't even have to be sealed.
Must be area specific for cost. In my parts, soapstone is one of the most expensive options.
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Old 11-13-2014, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Originally Posted by southbel View Post
Must be area specific for cost. In my parts, soapstone is one of the most expensive options.
Could be. I guess all things are relative. In my area, they're about as expensive as mid range granite, but LESS expensive than custom made granite countertops.

Also, while soapstone can be more expensive for material alone, it is generally LESS expensive when it comes to installation, due to the fact that it's very easy to handle and install. Easy to cut, very little waste and very small chance of damage while cutting and handling. So...it can even out.
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Old 11-13-2014, 06:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NC_Paddler View Post
Thanks Dave. I've seen a bunch of DIY videos on youtube. No go, eh?

Quartz would be nice, but cost prohibitive.
Actually, the entry level quartz options, some of which are quite nice, are not that much more expensive than the entry-level granite (normally, I think the two would be closer in price, but we are getting an especially low price from this granite supplier @ about $33/sf. The silestone quartz runs about $42/sf at Lowe's). Given the size of the kitchen, it may only be about $400-500 more for the quartz, which may be worth it. I think the prices on soapstone are quite a bit more than this.
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Old 11-13-2014, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NC_Paddler View Post
Actually, the entry level quartz options, some of which are quite nice, are not that much more expensive than the entry-level granite (normally, I think the two would be closer in price, but we are getting an especially low price from this granite supplier @ about $33/sf. The silestone quartz runs about $42/sf at Lowe's). Given the size of the kitchen, it may only be about $400-500 more for the quartz, which may be worth it. I think the prices on soapstone are quite a bit more than this.
Check not only the cost of materials, but also the cost of installation. Add them together - only then can you see what the real total cost will be for all your options.
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Old 11-13-2014, 07:36 PM
 
1,306 posts, read 3,431,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Check not only the cost of materials, but also the cost of installation. Add them together - only then can you see what the real total cost will be for all your options.
Why would it be any cheaper for my builder to install soapstone than granite or quartz?
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,634 posts, read 40,078,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NC_Paddler View Post
Why would it be any cheaper for my builder to install soapstone than granite or quartz?
Because it's much easier to handle and doesn't require a lot of finishing or special tools to cut. It's also less likely to be damaged during cutting and installation, thus lowering the cost potentially.


Cost Comparison: Soapstone vs. Granite - Kitchens Forum - GardenWeb

How Much Do Soapstone Countertops Cost? Soapstone Countertop Installation Cost Information |

Here's my advice - from experience. Any counter top or flooring or whatever has two costs - the cost of the material, and the cost of installation. You won't know the total cost till you have the cost of BOTH steps of the process.
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