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View Poll Results: Tile or hardwood in the kitchen
Tile 14 33.33%
hardwood 17 40.48%
other (please specify) 11 26.19%
Voters: 42. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-02-2014, 06:55 AM
 
4,631 posts, read 7,812,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glad2BHere View Post
I currently use Bona on my hardwoods, however, recently a "floor" specialist told me not to use Bona, but dish soap and water. Anyone have any comments on that?
Whoa, never. Everytime I'm talking hardwood with an expert Bona is the only recomendation that Always comes back glowing. About the only negative I've ever heard is that the HD Traffic is e.x.p.e.n.s.i.v.e. (roughly 5 times the price of poly And you need more for proper coverage).


Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I like it! How easy is it to keep clean!
VCT? Stupid simple to keep clean. My process is simply dry-mopping (this exact mop, the covers come off for washing ~ O-Cedar Dual-Action Flip Mop - Walmart.com) to pick up the dog hair/dust/loose crumbs. I actually do the whole house before hitting the kitchen with this. Then put on another cover for wet work and mist the floor with Armstrong Once-N-Done while scrubbing with the mop. I use 2 more covers for the rest of the house (tile bathrooms and hardwood), again simply misting the floor and scrubbing with the mop. Any Big spills are simple to spot clean. These tiles are 1/4 inch thick and the same color all the way through, so scratches vanish. The floor can be wet-mopped, which I've had to do when guests do things like shake an OJ carton that doesn't have a lid on it... heh. If you want a super shiny finish, the floors can be buffed (never done that myself, I'm more into the matte look).

There's a good reason why you see these exact same tiles used in Hospitals, schools, grocery stores and the like. Hard to damage, easy to clean, and wear like iron. The difficulty is in getting past the industrial look, which means doing some design work ~ hence the basket-weave pattern. I'd not hesitate to use the LVT, or Luxury Vinyl Tiles, either.... those come in faux stone and wood finishes for folks with a more delicate sensibility.
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Scott County, Tennessee/by way of Detroit
3,330 posts, read 2,244,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
Perhaps this is something due to regional differnces but in my experience (mostly in the Chicago region) there are no "slats" of any kind of between a properly installed / finished hardwood floor. It is no harder to clean "grease" nor "spill yogurt" or any other substance off hardwood flooring than any other normal interior flooring.

Perhaps the time spent in your 20 years of gov work and 9 years of housecleaning did not give you much exposure to the long history of hardwood flooring nor modern methods of care -- Bona Pro Series 15" Hardwood Floor Care System. Firms like Bona make not just the care kits (which you will note are also used on tile and stone ...) but the products professsionals use to seal hardwood floors.
Wow..thanks for that..Yes, I pretty much had no idea what I was doing all those years...
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Old 12-02-2014, 09:29 AM
 
41 posts, read 43,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glad2BHere View Post
What would be permeable?
A permeable flooring is anything that allows moisture to pass through it to some extent so the subfloor can be dried through it. Wood, carpet, cork, and brick are examples. Vinyl, most types of tile, and most sealants used on permeable floorings are non-permeable.

What do you guys think of brick in a kitchen?
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Old 12-02-2014, 09:32 AM
 
11,006 posts, read 8,539,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian_M View Post
If the prior owners of my 1930 home had left well enough alone, I'd have original hardwood in the kitchen. As it is, they ham-fisted a remodel and tore it all out. So I went with what seems to be my standard/backup (I've had it in 3 homes now), VCT... yup, the same industrial tiles found in grocery stores, schools and industrial buildings. Looks terrible, right?
I love it!
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Old 12-02-2014, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Madison, AL
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I've had both and I prefer wood HANDS DOWN. I'm not "that" old, but the last 3 years living in a house with tile in kitchen has taken a toll on my feet, legs & back. Plus I can't stand grout. We just had our tile professionally cleaned & the grout sealed and it's a lot better looking. But still I prefer wood. YES, there is a chance that something will leak and you might have some water damage, but there's also a chance that your house might get blown away by a tornado! That doesn't keep you from building one. So to choose tile because something might someday happen to the wood is a silly argument, IMO. Standing on the floor for hours on end week after week...that will happen for sure! So I don't want to be uncomfortable while standing on it and dislike the looks of it just to mitigate a risk that might or might not happen. In all my years of living in my own houses (over 20), I have yet to experience a water or dishwasher leak in the kitchen.

Also, replacing cracked tile is a PITA. Drop something heavy just the right way, and tile will crack. Yes, wood might scratch or dent, but that's part of the character Cracked tile just looks crappy. And what do you do if you can't find the EXACT tile to replace a cracked one? You have to replace them all! No thanks.

I know it's a personal preference issue. My preference is wood for the reasons stated above.

And yes, you can clean wood floors. A mix of warm water & vinegar always left mine beautiful. You can mop....you just can't pour a whole bucket of water out on the floor and let it sit there forever. Wood flooring isn't as fussy as some people make it out to be.
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Old 12-02-2014, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Chicago
3,281 posts, read 4,963,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheThistle View Post
A permeable flooring is anything that allows moisture to pass through it to some extent so the subfloor can be dried through it. Wood, carpet, cork, and brick are examples. Vinyl, most types of tile, and most sealants used on permeable floorings are non-permeable.

What do you guys think of brick in a kitchen?
I don't think brick is a good idea. It will absorb spills unless you seal it somehow. It's also going to be really hard like tile. It also absorbs light and could make the space feel really dark.

We had a brick back splash in our last house and it was the first thing we ripped out when we moved in. It made the kitchen so dark. If it had been anywhere near the range I imagine it would have been totally disgusting to boot.
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Old 12-02-2014, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Madison, AL
1,614 posts, read 1,815,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheThistle View Post
A permeable flooring is anything that allows moisture to pass through it to some extent so the subfloor can be dried through it. Wood, carpet, cork, and brick are examples. Vinyl, most types of tile, and most sealants used on permeable floorings are non-permeable.

What do you guys think of brick in a kitchen?
I love the look of brick in the right style; however, I personally wouldn't want it for the same reasons I wouldn't want tile. (don't like keeping grout clean; hard surface hard on my back & legs; things break easily)

I've seen some lovely homes on Pinterest, Houzz, etc. with brick pavers in foyers, mud rooms, sunrooms, etc. and I drool over them! But I wouldn't want them in my kitchen.
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Old 12-02-2014, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,232 posts, read 39,878,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TN2HSV View Post
YES, there is a chance that something will leak and you might have some water damage, but there's also a chance that your house might get blown away by a tornado! That doesn't keep you from building one. So to choose tile because something might someday happen to the wood is a silly argument, IMO. In all my years of living in my own houses (over 20), I have yet to experience a water or dishwasher leak in the kitchen.
I think wood floors are beautiful, but considering that I just had a leak in my dishwasher and a few months ago had a leak in my ice maker line, and have never had a tornado blow away my house, even though I live in Tornado Alley - I'd say that my fear of a water leak and subsequent damage to a wood floor is a bit too "real" for me to feel comfortable with the idea.

But I don't much care for tile, either, which is why we went with travertine. It's rustic and extremely varied in color as well as finish, and we had it professionally sealed (and the grout is a darker grout anyway, so even better). We thought a lot about this flooring before we put it in. With the gel mats (that are also cute - LOL) the hardness of the floor just isn't an issue. Also, we have plenty of spare pieces in case one cracks, but that's not particularly likely.

We couldn't be happier!

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 02-07-2020 at 07:14 AM..
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Old 12-02-2014, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Scott County, Tennessee/by way of Detroit
3,330 posts, read 2,244,009 times
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Looks great....
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Old 12-05-2014, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Madison, AL
1,614 posts, read 1,815,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I think wood floors are beautiful, but considering that I just had a leak in my dishwasher and a few months ago had a leak in my ice maker line, and have never had a tornado blow away my house, even though I live in Tornado Alley - I'd say that my fear of a water leak and subsequent damage to a wood floor is a bit too "real" for me to feel comfortable with the idea.

But I don't much care for tile, either, which is why we went with travertine. It's rustic and extremely varied in color as well as finish, and we had it professionally sealed (and the grout is a darker grout anyway, so even better). We thought a lot about this flooring before we put it in. With the gel mats (that are also cute - LOL) the hardness of the floor just isn't an issue. Also, we have plenty of spare pieces in case one cracks, but that's not particularly likely.

We couldn't be happier!
Looks very nice! I do love the look of travertine.

Some prefer time; some prefer wood. Some prefer vinyl. Variety is the spice of life!
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