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View Poll Results: Tile or hardwood in the kitchen
Tile 14 33.33%
hardwood 17 40.48%
other (please specify) 11 26.19%
Voters: 42. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-05-2014, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,573 posts, read 40,036,432 times
Reputation: 71585

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TN2HSV View Post
Looks very nice! I do love the look of travertine.

Some prefer time; some prefer wood. Some prefer vinyl. Variety is the spice of life!
Thank you, and I totally agree!

People need to consider their lifestyles, the climate, the risk of moisture, etc before they choose ANY flooring. Based on their own unique situation, they can then make an informed choice rather than simply defaulting to what they think LOOKS best.
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Old 12-05-2014, 08:24 AM
 
Location: North Texas
24,576 posts, read 34,290,563 times
Reputation: 28402
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jan Alaska View Post
I voted other, we are looking at cork for both our kitchen and bathroom. We are also considering vinyl, its low maintenance, has some great finishes nowadays and is super easy to install.

Either way I'm a mopper, I really don't do well with floors that need lots of extra care. When I clean I sweep and wet mop with a good old fashioned cotton rag head mop (I even have a pro quality bucket on wheels with the squeegee) for this reason vinyl would be ideal and cork looks like it would survive nicely too.
My house has 60 year-old cork flooring in the den. A cork floor's lifespan is 20-30 years, so it has definitely lasted a very long time. However it is far from maintenance-free. I have to get down on my hands and knees and hand wax the floor using paste wax, then hand buff it to a glossy shine. You could probably use some kind of buffing machine on it, but you'd have to move all the furniture out of the room to do that. Plus you'd have to rent or buy the actual buffer.

I have to wax the floor at least twice a year, otherwise it loses its shine and looks awful. I'm considering tearing it out to be honest. It's outlived its usefulness. It IS easy on the feet and back but it is easily damaged and is always thirsty for wax. Any other kind of sealer I've tried on it will not stay on it, i.e. it literally flakes or rubs off. Paste wax is the only thing that works on it. Maybe modern cork is pre-treated. I dunno.

I have vinyl in the kitchen and I hate it. It is pitted in some areas, losing its finish in others, and you can see the seams.

You CAN mop a cork floor but it's like hardwood...very very slightly damp mop. Otherwise you'll wash off all the finish you so lovingly applied to it in the first place. I sweep my cork floor every week but I don't like to mop it that frequently.

Right now I'm pondering changing my kitchen floor. Tile seems like the easy go-to option but I have foot and back problems. I don't want flooring that is hard on my feet, but I also don't want a floor that will be destroyed by a water leak. Since my house is almost 60 years old (along with the plumbing), it has happened more than once.
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Old 12-05-2014, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
25,432 posts, read 16,383,435 times
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Marmoleum Forbo

You might look into Marmoleum. That would be my choice for a new floor. I don't know if I can sell it to DH, however. It is pricier than most vinyl, I think.
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Old 12-08-2014, 11:52 AM
 
Location: North Texas
24,576 posts, read 34,290,563 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Marmoleum Forbo

You might look into Marmoleum. That would be my choice for a new floor. I don't know if I can sell it to DH, however. It is pricier than most vinyl, I think.
I had an estimate done for Marmoleum. It was going to be $9k for materials and labor for my small-to-medium sized kitchen.
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Old 12-08-2014, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Morrisville, NC
8,146 posts, read 11,467,275 times
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We have hardwoods throughout the house, including the kitchen, except for the upstairs bathrooms and the laundry, where we have hard tile.

I agree the whole ruin a floor when the dishwasher leaks is a bit overblown. Unless you live in a slab house, you still have wood under whatever floor you have and it can get damaged and cause issues with the finish floor regardless of what it is. In fact, sheet vinyl can be even worse, because it can allow water to wick across a wide area underneath.
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Old 12-08-2014, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Madison, AL
1,614 posts, read 1,818,037 times
Reputation: 1638
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherifftruman View Post
We have hardwoods throughout the house, including the kitchen, except for the upstairs bathrooms and the laundry, where we have hard tile.

I agree the whole ruin a floor when the dishwasher leaks is a bit overblown. Unless you live in a slab house, you still have wood under whatever floor you have and it can get damaged and cause issues with the finish floor regardless of what it is. In fact, sheet vinyl can be even worse, because it can allow water to wick across a wide area underneath.
That is absolutely true. I suppose tile or sheet vinyl on top of concrete slab would be the most impervious to water damage. But if you live on a crawlspace or a basement foundation and have a SERIOUS leak, the subfloor will be damaged regardless of the finish flooring.
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Old 12-13-2014, 07:07 PM
 
Location: East Coast
673 posts, read 597,553 times
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After living with hardwoods in my kitchen and powder rooms, I have to go with those who say NO!!!

We had kids, a German Shepherd with sharp nails, splashes from washing hands, a dishwasher leak, ice cubes falling out of the fridge unnoticed, and a toilet leak which all wreaked havoc on my floors.

Yes, they were poly'd with a great sealer, but if water sits unnoticed even for an hour, it ruins the area boards. They constituted a great amount of upkeep, and I thought were difficult to keep clean. The manufacturers did not recommend any water or soap products on the floors (medium oak). Just a slightly damp sponge mop, which I feel did not sanitize the floor.

We also had fostered kittens and pups, as well as had a couple of our own. Heaven forbid if one piddled on the wood flooring...it was difficult to keep them out of an "open" kitchen as well!

So, in reading this thread, I think I'd go with a beautiful porcelain or travertine, with very thin grout lines, and just use throw rugs and gel pads to cushion and warm it up. Second choice would be upscaled vinyl. I'd have to look at the industrial tiles in order to see the options. Having something removable would be great!

In our little vacation home, we've put industrial carpet in the other rooms, and it's virtually indestructible! Maybe these industrial tiles are along those same lines, but I do like the fact a tile could be switch out if damaged or stained.

thanks,

Dandiday
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Old 12-15-2014, 06:33 PM
 
12 posts, read 7,767 times
Reputation: 14
for me the material for the kitchen floor either hardwood or tile, the same needs, the most important in the installation of wood flooring not to forget the chemicals to get rid of termites disorders.
http://arsindociptakarya.com/wp-cont...014/03/gid.jpg

http://arsindociptakarya.com/wp-cont...4/03/girkm.jpg
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Old 12-18-2014, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
252 posts, read 517,269 times
Reputation: 80
Floors are needed to be durable to stay the same for longer. I have limestone tile flooring in my kitchen. They are easy to maintain. Once the floor is cleaned, the hygienic of surface can be maintained for longer.
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