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Old 12-14-2014, 08:33 AM
 
Location: East Coast
673 posts, read 597,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
We just gutted and remodeled our kitchen a few months ago (it was actually completed just about a month ago). I had a thread going about it, step by step. Here it is:

//www.city-data.com/forum/house...es-coming.html

It was an amazing transformation and we are very, very happy with it! We had a contractor do the work - it cost us more but after seeing their professionalism vs what we'd be bumbling about doing, I am glad we made that choice.

I definitely wanted a classic look - not a trendy look. Long story short, we ended up with painted cabinets (which I LOVE), soapstone counter tops, stainless steel appliances, farmhouse sink, translucent subway tile backsplash, and travertine flooring.

The thread details every step of the project. Enjoy! And feel free to ask any questions. I will be happy to help in any way I can.
Hi Kathryn,
Great to bump into you again! I'll take a look at your reno, thanks for re-posting the link!!!

I agree with your take on no wood, BTW...we had similar "flood" issues, including sloppy kids, dogs, etc...

It ruined our wood floors! Never (by choice) again!!!

Thanks so much,

Dandiday
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Old 12-14-2014, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,458 posts, read 39,960,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DandiDay View Post
Hi Kathryn,
Great to bump into you again! I'll take a look at your reno, thanks for re-posting the link!!!

I agree with your take on no wood, BTW...we had similar "flood" issues, including sloppy kids, dogs, etc...

It ruined our wood floors! Never (by choice) again!!!

Thanks so much,

Dandiday
You're welcome and good luck with your kitchen!

Not sure what "style" of classic you are preferring, but here's the look we ended up with - which I love. To me, it is timeless vs trendy:

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 02-07-2020 at 07:14 AM..
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Old 12-14-2014, 10:13 AM
 
4,675 posts, read 8,108,500 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DandiDay View Post
OK- what color is the countertop? Do you have to repaint the cabinets often?
I'm going to have to get a book on period houses to read about original fixtures and colors...

However, I thought putting a "classic" or timeless kitchen in would be acceptable, too. So, that brings me back to my original questions; what is a good kitchen to put in for a more classic/timeless look? Style? colors?

Thanks!
Dandiday
The counter is cranberry with splotches of forest green and navy.

If my memory serves me correctly, the cabinets were last painted early 80's. I know it was oil based paint because Dad wouldn't let me paint them. He said I left too many brush marks. If someone else in the family has painted them since, I don't know. It's a family summer home.

I used a combination of foam roller and sable brush on my own cabinets. I also used a specialty primer (Insil-x) and a specialty cabinet paint (Cabinet Coat) also by Insil-x. Love that primer. It sticks to everything! But if you're sloppy...you're going to have a lot of hard cleanup.

Growing up my parents always bought new construction when we weren't in officer's quarters. The houses they bought all had site-built kitchen cabinets. Birch. We're talking mid 50's and onward. The townhouse in Alexandria VA they rented in the early 50's (newly built) had white painted site built cabinets......with ugly yellow formica.

Auntie's house c1930's.....had white painted wood cabinets with gray formica. Grandma's tudor house built 1926(that was one dark house) had wood cabinets which went through a series of different colors. Grandma liked to paint. White tiled counters which is why she broke so many dishes. In my youth I had an apartment built in the 20's in Beverly Hills. White painted cabinets and yellow and white tiled counters. I broke a lot of dishes and glassware myself.

Senior office housing... large brick colonials.....built 1938.....white metal cabinets....various colors of counter tops among the 30 or so houses on base. At another base in Canada one house....probably built as well in the 30's had white wood beadboard cabinets...the counter - something equally as ugly to what is in the summerhouse...though more browns and greens. the second house we had on that base had white metal cabinets and white with silver flecked formica. I know that house was built mid 50's.

My house as it now stands was built in the 1870's with major renovation c 1910. When doing the reno work, kitchen wall color was a dark muted green first, then blue, then white, then yellow, then pink, then yellow, then white and then what we call contractor beige. It's now back to white semi-gloss to improve light reflection.

Here's a good example of a Victorian kitchen.

http://www.oldhouseonline.com/an-aut...itchen-design/

And then on to Edwardian times.
https://emblah13.wordpress.com/2013/...and-interiors/

Last edited by ocngypz; 12-14-2014 at 10:26 AM..
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Old 12-14-2014, 11:50 AM
 
Location: East Coast
673 posts, read 597,384 times
Reputation: 648
Default Beautiful and intriguing

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
You're welcome and good luck with your kitchen!

Not sure what "style" of classic you are preferring, but here's the look we ended up with - which I love. To me, it is timeless vs trendy:
KA- Your end result is stunning! Great use of space, function, and storage. This would be my idea of a kitchen that transcends the "flavor of the day" and isn't one that would go out of style. I now see what everyone is saying about white cabinets...and it's broken up very well with various architectural elements, as well as the patterning in the counter tops, along with the stainless steel appliances. Beautiful color combos! Did you also have any great ideas for storage? Such as, pull out drawers within the cabinets? Vertical pull-out storage that maximizes space and function? Maybe I missed it, but what was your approximate overall budget for this transformation?

The renovated kitchens I viewed last week were more stark and "cold". Black granite seemed to be the norm there, which probably added to the austere look.

Thanks for taking the time to post this. You created a very welcoming and functional kitchen, one in which I'd enjoy working and cooking. I shall use elements of your kitchen in mine!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ocngypz View Post
The counter is cranberry with splotches of forest green and navy.

If my memory serves me correctly, the cabinets were last painted early 80's. I know it was oil based paint because Dad wouldn't let me paint them. He said I left too many brush marks. If someone else in the family has painted them since, I don't know. It's a family summer home.

I used a combination of foam roller and sable brush on my own cabinets. I also used a specialty primer (Insil-x) and a specialty cabinet paint (Cabinet Coat) also by Insil-x. Love that primer. It sticks to everything! But if you're sloppy...you're going to have a lot of hard cleanup.

Growing up my parents always bought new construction when we weren't in officer's quarters. The houses they bought all had site-built kitchen cabinets. Birch. We're talking mid 50's and onward. The townhouse in Alexandria VA they rented in the early 50's (newly built) had white painted site built cabinets......with ugly yellow formica.....

....(I edited for space)...........

Here's a good example of a Victorian kitchen.

An Authentic Victorian Kitchen Design - Old-House Online - Old-House Online

And then on to Edwardian times.
https://emblah13.wordpress.com/2013/...and-interiors/
Great information, post, and links! Especially about the primer and paint. Very helpful.

OK - Now seeing this, I just want to give a "nod" to the older kitchens...not recreate them. Although, the first link showed an intriguing kitchen, one which recreated the original look of the time period.

Through your explanations and the photos in the second link, I can see where white and stainless does give that "nod" to the older time periods...couple that with Kathryn's kitchen above, then, I'm more assured about just tweaking the reno'd kitchens to warm them up a bit.

We, too, were military, and lived with a variety of on-base housing. The kitchens in Germany were directly from the '70's...with orange laminate cabinets, and yellow formica. U*G*L*Y*!!! Thankfully, the military reno'd the kitchens while we lived there. They just replaced the doors with medium-stained thin wood product, and a beige formica counter top. At least we didn't need sunglasses in the kitchen anymore!
The Edwardian style rooms posted in the second link were exciting for me to see, as I have much of the same furniture.

In fact, the dining room set in the Langmatt Villa is almost the same as ours - we do have very similar chairs, and have the same dining table legs/base...although our table top is oval. All in a beautiful walnut - I love it! We also have a buffet deux corps in walnut, in a Louis XV style to complement the dining set.

We (er, I) sort of went nuts with the antiques whilst in Europe. Well, we were there for over 10 years, mostly in England and Germany, and were at the point of having paid off college and med school loans and needing furniture anyway. I found that the antiques were beautifully constructed, made of solid wood (oak, walnut, and mahogany) with dovetailed and peg construction, and incredible attention to detail.
With the exchange rate as it was, some pieces were often less expensive than contemporary furniture; they were often constructed from lesser grades of wood or fiberboard with wood laminate.

Scrolling through more photos, we seem to have a mix of Edwardian, Louis XIV (a dessert buffet with granite!), and Louis XV (buffet, libraries, and wardrobes), very similar to those in the photos.

Judging from just these photos, I can definitely recreate some of the rooms, or at least give the feeling of an earlier time.

So, at the end of it all, I'll stick to the creamy warm-white kitchen, but try to add some interest via glass-fronted cabinets, some architectural details, stainless appliances, etc.

I'll also have to research counter tops more...especially soapstone. We'll also check out other ones, including quartz, and perhaps some other eclectic mixes.

Your posts have really helped us out -Many thanks to you all!

I'll post back here in a few months after we find our house. I'll probably have to reno a bit, and shall post our before and afters!
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Old 12-14-2014, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,458 posts, read 39,960,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DandiDay View Post

Thanks for taking the time to post this. You created a very welcoming and functional kitchen, one in which I'd enjoy working and cooking. I shall use elements of your kitchen in mine!
[quote]KA- Your end result is stunning! Great use of space, function, and storage. This would be my idea of a kitchen that transcends the "flavor of the day" and isn't one that would go out of style. I now see what everyone is saying about white cabinets...and it's broken up very well with various architectural elements, as well as the patterning in the counter tops, along with the stainless steel appliances. Beautiful color combos! [quote]

Thanks for your appreciation! I am really loving the kitchen after living with it for two months.

The cabinets are not white - they are actually a soft moss gray green. In fact, the bottom cabinets are a slightly darker green than the upper cabinets, and then the walls are an even lighter green and the trim is a pale white with a greenish tint to it.

Quote:
Did you also have any great ideas for storage? Such as, pull out drawers within the cabinets? Vertical pull-out storage that maximizes space and function?
Yes, we had some special features for storage built in. We didn't really have a pantry, but we had a corner! So we built a very feature-full "pantry" with several pull out drawers and a special place for stuff like tin foil, plastic storage bags, wax paper, etc.

But my FAVORITE part of that unit is the four inch deep shelved area on the front of that cabinet (see pics in the thread - I'll try to post a few but anyway...), with the four doors. This front is within arm's reach of the stove, and that's where I store all my spices and oils and vinegars and syrups! I LOVE IT.

I also have a tall, skinny pullout built into the island. I have bookshelves for cookbooks also built into the island as well as electricity. There are also three drawers - one shallow one for measuring cups, spoons, spatulas, etc and two deep ones for pots and pans.

Another favorite built in is the double trash can slide out to the right of the sink under the cabinet that I've dedicated to teas and coffee and all that paraphernalia. No more trash can sitting out or a tiny one stuck under the sink!

Quote:
Maybe I missed it, but what was your approximate overall budget for this transformation?
Hold onto your hat - about $25,000 and that did NOT include appliances (our appliances had all been updated in 2011). But we didn't scrimp on anything - and we didn't DO anything ourselves either - we had a contractor take it from start to turn key finish. They were great - stayed on schedule (four days off so I think that's pretty good).

Quote:
The renovated kitchens I viewed last week were more stark and "cold". Black granite seemed to be the norm there, which probably added to the austere look.
Granite just doesn't inspire me. Soapstone and quartzite are warmer and more "organic" in feel, to me anyway. You really owe it to yourself to go rub on some soapstone! And SO easy to take care of.

Soapstone wasn't all that expensive. I will be the first to tell you that it was our custom cabinetry and that floor that ran the price up. We had the floor laid in the "Versailles" pattern which is very labor intensive and has a repeat of about 26 stones if you can believe that. But I saw that floor and splurged on it!

The look I was going for was sort of a "Downton Abbey kitchen" look - early 20th century industrial, if that makes sense. We went with vintage look light fixtures and bulbs and they weren't cheap either.

You could save a lot of money by going with stock cabinets and a less expensive floor. The paint, soapstone counters, and subway tile backsplash weren't expensive. For that matter, I felt we got a good deal on the farm house sink ($760). The faucet wasn't exorbitant either (under $300 and I love it).

Keep us posted on your project and if I can help I certainly will! (By the way, we were also stationed in Germany with the Army - LOVED it and I also lucked up and was able to buy some beautiful European antiques including my dining room table, which is 1920s French tiger oak, and the chairs which are 1890s French oak.) We also recently acquired a GORGEOUS 1860s French buffet with the most amazing marble top you ever saw - and this dining room furniture is adjacent to the kitchen, so I wanted a look that was definitely NOT "contemporary" but was more timeless.

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 02-07-2020 at 07:14 AM..
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Old 12-15-2014, 09:24 AM
 
Location: East Coast
673 posts, read 597,384 times
Reputation: 648
Default Color!

hahaha! No, I'm not color-blind...just had my screen brightness down to conserve energy. Thanks for explaining the color, KA. It's a glorious kitchen!!!
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Old 12-15-2014, 02:47 PM
 
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ithink medium simple design would be good for medium level, for high level would better give some best design of it. Or u might want classic? http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wdiAMOhmTw...00/klasik5.jpg
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Old 12-15-2014, 06:52 PM
 
Location: East Coast
673 posts, read 597,384 times
Reputation: 648
Default Beautiful

The photo in the previous post reflects the colors and style of many homes near me in Texas. They call it "Texas Tuscan".

It features warm browns, tans, beige, and creams. Tumbled marble is a "must" for the back splash and floors. Hidden fridge, massive counter tops (usually granite or quartz), and columns also are popular elements. Also, a ton of cabinets and storage space...walk-in pantries are the norm! Also, most of the main floor usually consists of just the huge open kitchen, larger family room, and a fancy dining room,if it's a 2-story dwelling.

Well, as they say "everything is bigger in Texas"...
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Old 12-15-2014, 07:04 PM
 
Location: East Coast
673 posts, read 597,384 times
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Default antiques and kitchens

KA, do you have any photos in the house forum showing some of your antiques? Don't you just love the wood of some of those pieces?

I'd love to see your buffet...mine is French as well, Louis XV (I think). Circa 1865-1880. I might have said granite, but perhaps it is marble. What is the style of yours?

We also found, at a different place, 2 bedside tables (walnut) with a similar-colored marble top (or granite). It's like a dark or tanned dusty rose color. Actually, it's very similar to that top on our French buffet!

I particularly like our buffet deux corps...the carving on it is simply jaw-dropping! There's almost a 3-d relief on a dressed man on one upper door, and grand lady on the other. Spindles, rails, and fluted set-on columns also add to the allure of the piece.

If I acquire an "open concept" kitchen (or build one), I'd like to incorporate the buffet between the kitchen and dining room somehow.

If yours is in eyesight from the kitchen, that's probably beautiful! Again, I really liked the elements and design of your kitchen- and actually, the price is not really that bad at all. I've seen other kitchens (friends in Texas) that went much higher...most likely due to the enormous size!

thanks again for posting - I've enjoyed seeing the progress and transition into the final, beautiful product!
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Old 12-15-2014, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
50,458 posts, read 39,960,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DandiDay View Post
KA, do you have any photos in the house forum showing some of your antiques? Don't you just love the wood of some of those pieces?

I'd love to see your buffet...mine is French as well, Louis XV (I think). Circa 1865-1880. I might have said granite, but perhaps it is marble. What is the style of yours?

We also found, at a different place, 2 bedside tables (walnut) with a similar-colored marble top (or granite). It's like a dark or tanned dusty rose color. Actually, it's very similar to that top on our French buffet!

I particularly like our buffet deux corps...the carving on it is simply jaw-dropping! There's almost a 3-d relief on a dressed man on one upper door, and grand lady on the other. Spindles, rails, and fluted set-on columns also add to the allure of the piece.

If I acquire an "open concept" kitchen (or build one), I'd like to incorporate the buffet between the kitchen and dining room somehow.

If yours is in eyesight from the kitchen, that's probably beautiful! Again, I really liked the elements and design of your kitchen- and actually, the price is not really that bad at all. I've seen other kitchens (friends in Texas) that went much higher...most likely due to the enormous size!

thanks again for posting - I've enjoyed seeing the progress and transition into the final, beautiful product!
Thank you, thank you, thank you! Yes, I will post some pictures of the antiques we got in Europe. You post yours too!
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