U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-23-2008, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
467 posts, read 1,735,218 times
Reputation: 170

Advertisements

Hey, all,

I'm finishing up college, and though it is not one of the top possibilities of what I may do after, I am looking into the idea of interior redesign (which mostly entails using the client's existing furniture and accessories, etc) and also organization. This woman I admire so much, Kyle Freeman of cloud9or.com does this in Massachusetts, and if I could have her business, I would.

But, and I hope I don't offend anyone here, god knows I will, I feel like the industry is really unregulated (especially when compared to interior design). I've seen a lot of women out there who are middle aged or retired, looking to do something more for fun, and because they like french country draperies and their friends like their wood paneled basement, they decide to go to a five day seminar for redesign and call it a business. I look at a lot of websites for redesigners out there and I think, why do they pay you? And that's why I admire Kyle so much, because she is truly talented and innovative, but one in a hundred.

I don't mean to be offensive, I'm overstating really, but it ties into my wondering about how well regarded the field is, and if, especially in this economy, if such a career is doable.

So I was wondering if anyone who is in this field wanted to comment on how they got into it, how their business is doing, maybe how, as a college grad, I might approach getting into business, how they think the field is, etc. And again, sorry for being so blunt up there!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-23-2008, 04:06 AM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,468 posts, read 13,181,065 times
Reputation: 4199
Not offended at all, and in fact you've got the reality correct. I think the problem lies with the difference between an interior decorator and an interior designer. There are state regulations concerning the latter, but almost anyone can hang out a shingle as a decorator.

See ASID - State Licensing Regulations

And since many potential customers don't know the difference between a decorator and a designer, they don't look for the ASID designation.

If someone has ASID membership (American Society of Interior Designers), then a client can be pretty much assured that the designer/decorator has educationally gone beyond French country draperies and wood-paneled basements.

What's unfortunate are all the design shows on HGTV -- people watch them and say "hey, I can do that" and so they go out and start a business. Although there are state regulations, I wonder how well the industry is policed. And again, this goes back to the difference between a decorator and a designer.

Another problem I see is that there are a number on online schools offering a quasi certificate at the end of the program that says "You're now an interior designer!" I took one of these courses, and half way through I realized I was learning nothing but how to play with acrylic paints and colors. Essentially everyone 'graduates' from programs such as these even if they lack talent in design and decorating. But the designer/decorator can say to a client that "I graduated from such-n-such school", and the client, not knowing any better, is impressed and thinks the designer/decorator knows what he/she is doing. That's a shame and a sham.

In the end I didn't go into the field, so I can't comment about the business and its worthiness in this economy. However, I would think that redesign would fare well since clients would be more willing to pay a fee to a redesigner and reuse their current possessions rather that shell out $$ for new furniture and accessories.

It's caveat emptor for a client to hire a designer/decorator/redesigner who doesn't produce a portfolio of his/her work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2008, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, Mo.
24 posts, read 113,374 times
Reputation: 22
I think it would be a great idea to get into a business like that, canyontothesky. Since the economy is not so good right now there will be a lot of people wanting to "redesign" their homes but on a small budget. So many people want to hire a interior designer to come in and redo their whole house, but part of a interior designers job is to sell furniture that they offer which is not at all cheap and not really great looking. Even if you don't buy furniture from the designer, they still recommend putting a new chair "here" or adding a side table "there" which then involves going out and spending a good chunk of money for those items, and that's on top of the interior designer fee. I am in the home remodeling business and tile and stone business, and I have noticed so many people trying to get the modern minimalist look and de-clutter their homes but not know where to start or what to keep. Move to Kansas City and I will co-own the company with you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2008, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
467 posts, read 1,735,218 times
Reputation: 170
Hi, all,
Thanks for your comments. I wasn't expecting to hear that people felt it would be a good job considering the economy. You're right about that, if someone wants an ASID and can't afford it, they really may be able to afford a redesigner.
I am a big fan of this one redesigner who has offered to speak with me over the phone about the industry, so maybe she'll give me insight.

One thing I'm worried about -- and I've always been this way, about safety, with anything -- is having a job that is nearly 100% working out of other people's homes. I feel a bit worried about going into homes. I mean, if I worked in a safe area, one would assume there would be no problem, and usually there is a phone consultation before hand, but still. What do you think about that part? That's really a huge issue for me for some reason.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2008, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Kansas City, Mo.
24 posts, read 113,374 times
Reputation: 22
To be honest, I dont think that would be much of a problem. It is good to be aware of though. With my job I work almost 100% out of other peoples homes and have never ran into a situation where I felt unsafe. Now granted, Im a guy, but most of the clients you will be working with will be women and they would typically be the only ones home during the day when you are working there. Almost every job I do I work with the woman of the house until it comes time for them to pay me and then I see the husband for a couple minutes. I would think it would be about the same for you. I do work for a couple interior designers and they have never had a problem with feeling unsafe in a home. If you come across a job where you do feel unsafe then just say you have to leave for a little bit to go grab something and just leave. I think you will be fine. You should go for it and report back to us how everything is working out for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2008, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
467 posts, read 1,735,218 times
Reputation: 170
Thanks UrbanTile. I agree that most people have no problems. Problems like this we would hear about did they exist.

One thing I wonder, though, is. Most redesigners have a consultation fee, let's say its $150 for the first hour. So, I would assume, redesigners either make the people pay up front, or immediately when they arrive at the home, because what if you go through that hour, and the person is like, oh, um, I don't have the money to pay you! But because they sounded nice over the phone, yadda yadda, you didn't think it was a problem. You know? How might I conquer that issue?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2008, 04:40 AM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,468 posts, read 13,181,065 times
Reputation: 4199
Thinking what I would do ... I'd make a free initial consultation to chat and take photos and measuremens and not offer any suggestions at that time except for, perhaps, a few nonspecific teaser ideas. A new appointment would be set, and before setting foot in the client's house, I would discuss the fee. If the fee was agreeable, at the second appointment I would first have the client sign a consultation contract, bring out my drawings and ideas, and at the end of the consult collect the consultation fee. If the client hired me to do the physical work, again the agreed-upon fee for that would be preset, and before lifting a finger I would have the client sign a contract, do my job, then collect my fee.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2008, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
467 posts, read 1,735,218 times
Reputation: 170
The thing about redesign is that in that first consultation, a lot of actual suggestions are made and sometimes the job can be completed in that just one day... But, aha! A contract. Yes that is probably what to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2008, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
1,654 posts, read 6,874,517 times
Reputation: 939
Actually, education is what qualifies one to be an interior designer, not having the ASID appellation. Generally, to call yourself an interior designer, you have to have a degree from an accredited university, a certain amount of work experience, and you have to pass the NCDIQ exam. That's the only true way to become an interior designer.

Anyone with an eye for what looks good can tell you what furniture to buy. You don't have to go to a interior designer for that. Now, the placement of furniture is an art. It's actually called space planning, and that's one of the things that you learn in design school. Design school doesn't teach people how to select fabrics and paint and all of the pretty stuff, you have to pretty much have an eye for that when you go in. Design school teaches codes, and how to make plans and a lot of detailed things. It's actually a pretty difficult degree to study for. Basically, if one was to add maybe another year to a 4 year bachelors degree in interior design, they could probably become an architect. They are very similar.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2008, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Black Hammock Island
4,468 posts, read 13,181,065 times
Reputation: 4199
Quote:
Originally Posted by pennquaker09 View Post
Actually, education is what qualifies one to be an interior designer, not having the ASID appellation. Generally, to call yourself an interior designer, you have to have a degree from an accredited university, a certain amount of work experience, and you have to pass the NCDIQ exam. That's the only true way to become an interior designer.

Anyone with an eye for what looks good can tell you what furniture to buy. You don't have to go to a interior designer for that. Now, the placement of furniture is an art. It's actually called space planning, and that's one of the things that you learn in design school. Design school doesn't teach people how to select fabrics and paint and all of the pretty stuff, you have to pretty much have an eye for that when you go in. Design school teaches codes, and how to make plans and a lot of detailed things. It's actually a pretty difficult degree to study for. Basically, if one was to add maybe another year to a 4 year bachelors degree in interior design, they could probably become an architect. They are very similar.
You are absolutely correct in all of the above. The problem lies within our general society with the two words "decorator" and "designer" -- they are erroneously and often interchanged. And truly, as you wrote as have others, there's a big difference between the two.

I do wish that ASID required more stringent credentials for membership. Currently, a certified education (which doesn't necessarily mean a diploma) and experience can get one's foot in the door.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House > Home Interior Design and Decorating
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:53 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top