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Old 01-22-2010, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
302 posts, read 923,071 times
Reputation: 92

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Hi, im getting everything together for my kitchen reno, and wanted to hear some advice/experiences with the multitude of radiant floor heating companies out there. Also do you think a cork base is necessary on a slab floor? If so, does that get secured to the slab? I will be putting porcelain tile down.
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Old 01-22-2010, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
16,315 posts, read 60,490,631 times
Reputation: 21029
If you're considering radiant heat on a slab- there will be a need for a mud bed to encapsulate the heating mat(s) in. Generally, you can tile directly on top of slab as long as it is relatively level, clean, and no displaced cracks.
Don't think there would be any need for the cork.
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Old 01-25-2010, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
302 posts, read 923,071 times
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From what i've heard, there is a need for insulation, so as not to loose too much heat through the slab... thus cork.. Just wondering if anyone has any firsthand knowledge?
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Old 01-25-2010, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
16,315 posts, read 60,490,631 times
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I understand your concern- but when you're dealing with an existing slab you don't have much choice. And I don't think a thin layer of cork will be a beneficial insulator.
Depending on the climate zone you'd use 1-2" thick foam board above the vapor barrier before the concrete is poured.
The only thing I could possibly see as an alternative would be an aluminum foil/sheet- for reflective properties. But, the only time I've seen that application used is on conventional floor systems between the joists, in the cavities.
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Old 01-29-2010, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Corryton Tn.
7 posts, read 29,415 times
Reputation: 11
Default Electric radiant floor heat advice...

Radiant heat is installed in the mortar bed for ceramic tile installations.

I have seen cork underlayment used in high end condos in Florida for sound barriers, also seen a lot of cracked grout from movement. It's to flexible for me, but specified for those high rise developments.

You can find additional information dealing with concrete floor heating at the link below.

Concrete Floor Heating, SunTouch mats, New Kit on the Block

Resurfacer
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Old 03-12-2011, 07:33 AM
 
1 posts, read 2,809 times
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I'm really interested in this topic. Right now I have 240V elect mats, over 330sqft of slab. I'm going now to pick up grout then lay the tile. I was searching for depth of thin set I should use over the mats and under ceramic.

Id also like to hear more debate on the cork...
I didn't lay any...
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Old 04-03-2011, 04:22 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,948 times
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Hello, I am looking to install electric radiant heating in my bathroom. It's 5 1/2' by 4'. I will be putting in a new subfloor and then ceramic tile on top of the radiant heating. Can anyone suggest a good company to go with and anything I need to know before purchasing?
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Old 01-28-2012, 12:25 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
5,524 posts, read 7,689,470 times
Reputation: 10801
I don't know much about them, but my cousin's husband installed his own in the basement, which is very cold. I just remember her telling me they installed the wrong kind, and whatever they installed ended up costing then a HUGE electric bill. When they got them installed (professionally) in the kitchen, they went with some type of low-voltage system that kept the bill down. Just something to think about when you're comparing systems.
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