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Old 09-12-2010, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Morristown, TN
1,753 posts, read 4,253,258 times
Reputation: 1366

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Momma- farm. Although the house is a folk victorian, it's a farmhouse on a workin' farm first. This is the main bath, accessible by kids and visitors. The upstairs bath is ours- think farm/victorian/glam- I have a fluted pedestal sink, fluted toilet, shower stall, skylights, shabby chic sconces and a crystal chandelier. lol

My only concern about tile is supporting the tub while everything sets up. Removing the tub isn't an option. (It obviously went in before the walls were closed up!)

Got pics of the floor, Jensens? Or a link? No, nothing failed- just where someone went from an interior floor to an exterior floor- you should see the crooked doorways. Let's just say that previous owners (from the builder down to us, I guess) were not as um, conscientious, as they should have been. Math problems written on the wallcovering under the beadboard support this theory.....

The upstairs hardwood is currently painted- we pulled up the carpet and discovered that the floors had been used for drop cloths. Another of those 'oh crap, we gotta live here NOW' and fix it right later things....unlike the fixes we did to the last owner's 'fixes'. You know... the plumbing leak fixed with duct tape, the leaking washer line with multiple pieces of plywood, the gutters dumping water into the wall and rotting it out- from the siding to the interior walls, the roof leak fixed with a green tee shirt.... I could go on and on....
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Old 09-12-2010, 09:28 AM
 
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well.... since the tub has to stay that limits you somewhat. You are going to have to choose a floor you can do in at least two steps... unless you have a way of suspending the tub from the ceiling... and a claw-foot is a heavy son-ofa-gun.

Unless you go down to the joists, you are going to level the floor by skimming (what a handyman friend I know calls it) it. This basically means that you are going to have to put a layer of goo on the floor and level it. This is used under ceramic tile or the bigger block tiles.
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Old 09-13-2010, 04:25 AM
 
Location: Morristown, TN
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lol, although the ceiling is strong- it isn't THAT strong

I suspect i'll have to lay some thin plywood at the very end and THEN level the floor. It's that big a drop.
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Old 09-13-2010, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,708 posts, read 79,880,612 times
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I would still use tile. Just tile right up to the edge of the tub and grout the gap.

I will look for a picture of that poly whtever flooring, but you would nto want to use the kind that we did (it is in our daughter's bathroom and is cream with big bluish and greenish dots.) . It looks a lot like good old linoleum, but it is a one pieve floating floor (not glued, just cut it and lay it in place). It is much stronger than the modern vinyl junk that replaced linoleum (do nto everr use that stuff, it is worthelss). This is a cheap and easy option, not a beautiful or historically approriate option.
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Old 09-15-2010, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Morristown, TN
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Clawfoot, so it'd be painfully obvious, i'd think. True Lino that's cut and lay? Sounds interesting....
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Old 09-17-2010, 12:25 PM
 
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ramblinroseranch - i have had similar issues of no subfloors in an older home (1920s). first time, don't think we had right contractors - crappy job all around. the 2nd and final time we had bath redone, the contractors did level floor (a step up from hall into bathroom) via subfloor.

just a thought - for the clawsfoot tub, by any miracle, is it sitting on the joists/beams? if so, you could elevate tub to appropriate height with pieces of wood, etc. secured to joists.

if you know of any good contractors, bring them in for their opinion. i eventually got smart and became friendly with a very good flipper (complete rehabs, add'l story additions, etc.); i usually bounce ideas off of him. it's been priceless. we are currently having original floors re-done (began today), to discover some of the joists were cut out and other stupid stuff. first person i called when floor refinishers showed me, was that flipper.

also, we did the 'put new wood flooring over old'. hated it when it was done, still hate it. really looks out of place with adjoining room original floors and the step down into adjoining rooms. if the current floor people work out very well, i'll bring them back to take up the 'new' floor and replace original bad wood planks.

good luck in finding a good solution.
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Old 09-17-2010, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,708 posts, read 79,880,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RamblinRoseRanch View Post
Clawfoot, so it'd be painfully obvious, i'd think. True Lino that's cut and lay? Sounds interesting....

Not true lino they do nto make that anymore. But it is simlar. It is extremelly durable. It held up to the curling iron left on and dropped ont he floor, dragging various items accross it, the earring the punctured deepely into my foot did not puncture or scratcht eh flooring, lots of stuff that woudl stain many kinds of floors (like rouge, lipstick, cranberry juice, etc) left no stain. It seems to be pretty good stuff. I cannot find that name for it though. The bills are lost. The downside of one piece cut out flotaing floor is that if you make a mistake cutting it, you ruin the whole thing that can be expensive.
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Old 09-17-2010, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,708 posts, read 79,880,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RamblinRoseRanch View Post
Clawfoot, so it'd be painfully obvious, i'd think. True Lino that's cut and lay? Sounds interesting....
We tiled under clawfoot by lifting one leg at a time. It was a slow process, but it worked. you have to replace your pipes anyway becasue the tile changes the elevation.
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Old 09-21-2010, 01:11 PM
 
Location: NE CT
1,496 posts, read 3,388,117 times
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It all depends on how much you want to spend and how much work you want to put into it. Tile floors and tiled walls up to your "chair rail" is wise. A tiled shower addition would be nice but if you only have room for the original ball & claw tub, leave it and work the bath into the Victorian mode since that is when they first appeared in baths. Stick with the tile as it is clean and sanitary. The late Victorian baths had the black & white one inch square / tirangle tiles applied in 1 sq ft sections on the floors. They had black & white alternate square tiles up to the "chair rail" or, more often, topped off with a bull nose black tile and wall papered from there up to the ceiling.

I agree with all of those who say do it right now and it will last for years. Get that subfloor square and level before using any tile.

I would use sconces over the sink and a recessed light over the tub and in the shower, if you can fit one, all linked to a three gang dimmer switch for the lady's romantic bath in that wonderful ball and claw tub.
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Old 09-22-2010, 06:01 PM
 
Location: Morristown, TN
1,753 posts, read 4,253,258 times
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Thanks for the ideas, Brien51. I'm torn- since it's a folk victorian and was the main house for a working farm. Too fancy and it's not keeping with the actual function of the house. Too farm and it's not in line with the vintage.
No way to fit a shower- it's a little less than four feet wide.
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