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Old 10-30-2010, 10:28 AM
 
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the house was built in 1905.. the wall seems to be made with horse hair and some white hairs in the plaster... is there a chance the white hairs might be abestos
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Old 10-30-2010, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
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There is a very good chance you will have asbestos somewhere in a house built in 1905.
There is a very good chance you will have asbestos in the plaster walls in a house built in 1905, also the flooring, pipe insulation, duct insulation, etc.
The white hairs might be horse hair. Asbestos fibers are usually white or gray, but for the most part are not long like hair.
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Old 10-30-2010, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Puyallup WA
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Default Could be Asbestos

A home built in 1905 could definitely have asbestos in it. Asbestos was not regulated until the 1970's, so I would be careful. Is this a house you are purchasing? If so, there should be some sort of form in your state where the seller discloses problems with the property. Ask for that if there is one, it should tell you if there was asbestos and how/if it was treated.
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Old 10-31-2010, 07:56 AM
 
Location: The Ranch in Olam Haba
23,713 posts, read 29,120,481 times
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If it is, leave it alone. Its of no, or little, danger as long as its not disturbed.
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Old 10-31-2010, 08:17 AM
 
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Default As others have said...

House built long ago might have asbestos contained in them. That said, the odds of their being asbestos in the plaster are slim, asbestos fibers are far tinier than hair. Even if there is asbestos in the plaster the odds of it doing anyone harm there are remote -- it would have to be air borne to get breathed into your lungs...

More commonly, during some renovation, like when a new furnace or plumbing was added, the installers may have used a fireproofing material with asbestos in it. If subsequent repairs / renovations cut into that material and allowed it to become "friable" that would need to be removed / sealed up.

Asbestos identification is not like radon or lead, instead of a detector kit you need to take air samples. Those air samples then need to have all the microscope dust settle out. Then technicians with microscopes actually look at the dust until they physically identifiy fibers that have the unique appearance of asbestos. Very few folks go through this trouble.
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Old 10-31-2010, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
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I have to partially disagree with Chet on this one. Old plaster has a very high chance of having asbestos in it. It was commonly used as a binder, kind of like microscopic re-bar. IN fact, it can also be in the drywall and joint compound in homes form the 50's and 60's.

To test for asbestos a sample of the material is taken, and then sent to a lab. They analyze it and determine what type and the amount of the asbestos material is in it. I have taken hundreds of asbestos samples over the years. If there is reason to suspect there has been a fiber release, then air samples would be taken then.

The samples should be taken from someone that is qualified to do so. There is a very specific protocol to follow to keep from having a fiber release, and to protect the material the sample was taken from.

Not all asbestos is friable. Friable is a description of the "type" of the asbestos, not a "condition". However, friable is also used to describe the condition too - clear as mud now?
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Old 10-31-2010, 02:35 PM
 
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Default Let's rely on the science ...

The fiber bundles that are visible to the naked eyed would need to be sent to a lab for polarized light microscropy: Chrysotile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

You cannot tell just by looking at the stuff if it is dangerous http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbesto..._a_contaminant


No need to use mud to clarify, there are dictionaries and encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friability

http://www.asbestos.com/abatement/friable.php (broken link)
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/friable
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Old 10-31-2010, 02:59 PM
 
Location: North of the border!
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A little off topic but asbestos related. Around 1965-1967 in grade school we used to be supplied with powdered asbestos in art class. We would mix it with water to sculpt with.
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Old 01-04-2017, 04:28 PM
 
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working on a house with lath and plaster, built around 1870 to 1890. was asbestos commonly used in that era in Ohio?
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Old 01-04-2017, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
16,626 posts, read 61,366,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carl shiflett View Post
working on a house with lath and plaster, built around 1870 to 1890. was asbestos commonly used in that era in Ohio?
A house built in the mid to late 1800's was "probably" build using NO asbestos. But, that's not to say that the house is asbestos free. A house of that age has surely gone through many repairs, remodels, updates, etc. Any of which could have contained asbestos.

When in doubt, get a test kit! Assuming presence or absence based on simply age is shortsighted at best.
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