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Old 01-18-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: NE CT
1,496 posts, read 3,209,080 times
Reputation: 716

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Stick with the gas. It is way more responsive to quickly go up or down. Just be sure that you always have the gas in the off position when not using the stove. LNG or propane in its natural state is odorless, but the manufacturers add a chemical to it, so if it is leaking, you wiill smell it immediately and can correct the leak immediately. Every gas line has a safety shut off valve. You should locate it and be aware of its exact position so if you ever smell leaking gas you can shut that valve down immediately.
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Old 01-18-2011, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 10,392,248 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Engineering costs for running a 240 volt 40 Amp circuit? Now I see where some of the padding come in.
Well, that wasn't for an electrical project. I'm not an electrician, though I am in the construction industry and familar with the NEC and what it takes.

Actual CAD drawings, California Title 24 regulations incorporated, and complete panel load calcs - it's more than just a simple line drawing and a couple notes that passes for plans over here.
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Old 01-18-2011, 01:54 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 36,758,836 times
Reputation: 16952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Narfcake View Post
Well, that wasn't for an electrical project. I'm not an electrician, though I am in the construction industry and familar with the NEC and what it takes.

Actual CAD drawings, California Title 24 regulations incorporated, and complete panel load calcs - it's more than just a simple line drawing and a couple notes that passes for plans over here.
Notes and line drawings don't pass for plans anywhere. Adding a circuit doesn't take an Engineer, any Electrician SHOULD be able to do a simple panel load calc (simple, as in a complete load calc is a simple thing to do).
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Old 01-20-2011, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,791 posts, read 45,418,241 times
Reputation: 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Notes and line drawings don't pass for plans anywhere. Adding a circuit doesn't take an Engineer, any Electrician SHOULD be able to do a simple panel load calc (simple, as in a complete load calc is a simple thing to do).
I agree. My father was an electrician and I grew up working with him. I'm an architect now with 33 years of experience, I can't imagine paying $4,000 for this. Any decent electrician should be able to do this fine on his own. And at a much lower cost.
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Old 01-20-2011, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,284 posts, read 19,174,410 times
Reputation: 6645
Quote:
Originally Posted by brien51 View Post
Stick with the gas. It is way more responsive to quickly go up or down. Just be sure that you always have the gas in the off position when not using the stove. LNG or propane in its natural state is odorless, but the manufacturers add a chemical to it, so if it is leaking, you wiill smell it immediately and can correct the leak immediately. Every gas line has a safety shut off valve. You should locate it and be aware of its exact position so if you ever smell leaking gas you can shut that valve down immediately.
I completely disagre with your first statment. I had a gas stove for 24 years in my last house (a new gas stove 3 years before we moved) and now have a 2 year old electric stove. It is amazingly responsive and heats quicker than my gas stove did - almost instantaneous. I love the clean-up of my glass top stove - so very easy. I have a warming area, a bridge burner that connects two burners to be used for long roasting pans, etc. Generally, electric ovens are superior to gas ovens as far as cooking evenly - especially baked goods. I've learned to adapt to an electric stove - I love it and it is a cleaner way of cooking. I notice that the vent screens under the microwave (mounted above the electric range) rarely have to be washed but the screens on the vent above my gas range always seemed to have grime on them....electric is cleaner.
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Old 01-20-2011, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Pomona
1,955 posts, read 10,392,248 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
I agree. My father was an electrician and I grew up working with him. I'm an architect now with 33 years of experience, I can't imagine paying $4,000 for this. Any decent electrician should be able to do this fine on his own. And at a much lower cost.
I'm sensing that things have since been taken WAY out of context. Reread my previous posts - the $4k figure wasn't an electrical project, nor was it just the engineering aspects - it was everything.

However, the bottom line is that it all still costs money, and sight unseen with zero details for a property that you don't own, would you ever throw out a low figure? Hence, if the OP still wants to have this done, the project starts at $5k.

(If someone else want to do it for $4995, feel free to.)
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Old 01-20-2011, 10:04 PM
 
Location: sowf jawja
1,941 posts, read 8,796,604 times
Reputation: 1058
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Notes and line drawings don't pass for plans anywhere. Adding a circuit doesn't take an Engineer, any Electrician SHOULD be able to do a simple panel load calc (simple, as in a complete load calc is a simple thing to do).
yeh, this isn't the type of job we're pulling permits for.

there is a point where municipal fees added to a job make the task not worthwhile to the homeowner; this is bad for business, yet many municipalities ignore this fact.





with that being said; if you're living in an apartment with gas appliances, more than likely the service wasn't designed for the load of electric appliances and you won't be able to install them anyway. but call for an estimate; see what you can find out.
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Old 01-21-2011, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
3,341 posts, read 6,457,094 times
Reputation: 2078
funny i would love to have a gas range but am stuck with electric
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Old 01-22-2011, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,653 posts, read 23,601,268 times
Reputation: 5860
Having been a contractor in CA I have to take issue with Narf.

Obviously, there could be a variety of conditions that could make this job very easy, or very complex. However, adding one 40 or 50 amp/240V circuit to a panel would not require a complex permit process, and would be routine for a licensed electrical contractor.

To the OP. You need to get the owners permission to do anything, and its just my guess that they would probably not want to go to the expense of changing.
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Old 01-26-2011, 05:22 AM
 
Location: Penn Hills
1,326 posts, read 1,857,176 times
Reputation: 1637
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrgood101 View Post
i live in a apartment and have a gas stove do i need a electrition if i want to chang to electric stove
If you're really set on an electric stove, and you're not cooking for a very large family... I recommend just buying one or two of these, Walmart.com: GE Dual Burner Hot Plate: Appliances, and a decent sized toaster over. I know someone already mentioned the idea. At the last place I rented, there was a 20-30 year old gas stove where the burners were supposed to be lit by a lighter to turn on (so the landlord said). We chose never to do that and bought the hot plates + toaster oven instead. We cook extensively, and the only thing it really limited us on was that we couldn't cook a large turkey in the toaster oven (they have electric roasters for that) and it couldn't handle large cookie sheets. Anything that needed to boil took longer than on a gas stove too, but it wasn't the end of the world.
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