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Old 12-13-2011, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
201 posts, read 363,290 times
Reputation: 46

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I'm looking to buy a miter saw to help with my crown molding install. I want something good, but not top of the line. Besides crown molding it will be used for other general household upgrades and repairs. Any suggestions? I'd like to stay around $200-$250...

Thanks!
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Old 12-13-2011, 09:17 AM
 
Location: United State of Texas
1,708 posts, read 6,027,108 times
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I have a Craftsman compound miter saw. I've had it about 5 years and used it on multiple projects. It has a laser guide when cutting that is quite handy. So far it has been flawless. They normally are on sale around this time of year too!
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Old 12-13-2011, 09:19 AM
 
482 posts, read 1,192,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zembonez View Post
I have a Craftsman compound miter saw. I've had it about 5 years and used it on multiple projects. It has a laser guide when cutting that is quite handy. So far it has been flawless. They normally are on sale around this time of year too!

I use the same... had it for 2 years with no issues at all.
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Old 12-13-2011, 09:43 AM
 
9,124 posts, read 35,160,540 times
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I know professional tradespeople frown on them, but Ryobi makes some decent mitersaws, as long as you stay away from the sliders. Unless you're planning to do really large crown, a 10" saw will be more than adequate, and also reduces the cost and blade wobble compared to a 12" saw. Also, while compound saws are nice (dual-bevel being ideal) for larger crown to be cut on the flat, if you're looking at typical 3 5/8" crown, you can cut "in position" and don't even need a compound saw, since you'll just need to cut a miter. You can get a 10" Ryobi saw with a laser for about $150, and can also get a Ridgid saw for about the same price.
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Old 12-13-2011, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,727 posts, read 20,202,622 times
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I've had a DeWalt for 15 years or so. Excellent saw. Price might be a little over $250 by now, and it's probably top of the line so might be more than what you want. I've made tons of picture frames with it -- perfect cuts.
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Old 12-13-2011, 01:17 PM
 
10,135 posts, read 26,287,357 times
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Be sure and get a compound miter saw. If you have never used one, you might end up with a simple miter which will be of no use for crown moldings.
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Old 12-13-2011, 01:30 PM
 
9,124 posts, read 35,160,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Be sure and get a compound miter saw. If you have never used one, you might end up with a simple miter which will be of no use for crown moldings.
Simple miters are just fine for crown molding if you nest the crown against the saw at it's spring angle. Setting a compound miter saw for cutting on the flat is pretty tough for a hobbyist, especially if the corners aren't perfect 90's (which they hardly ever are). Unless you're cutting large molding that can't be nested, cutting on the flat is a waste of time and effort.
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Old 12-13-2011, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,436 posts, read 2,317,784 times
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I bought the Roybi when it was on-sale a month ago at Home Depot for $88. It has done everything I asked of it.
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Old 12-13-2011, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
201 posts, read 363,290 times
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Went to Home Depot and found these two in my price range...
Ryobi TSS101L 13AMP 10" Sliding Compound with Laser

DeWalt DW713 15AMP 10" Compound

I would think the DeWalt is a better saw, but doesn't have the sliding function.

Any thoughts on these two, or others in this range....
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Old 12-13-2011, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,313 posts, read 75,274,723 times
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Stay away from Harbor freight. They are cheap, but I am on my third one. This one works, but the gate(?) is out of alignment. (The thing you place the wood against to hold it straight. Iseem to recall it being called a gate or something similar)
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