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Old 03-18-2012, 11:52 PM
 
Location: California
243 posts, read 1,200,864 times
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Renovating a garage in Florida on a new home.

Floor was just painted with a concrete outdoor latex based paint by prior owner. Its ok, but I want something nicer.

Thinking of the Rustoleum Epoxy kits. I am assuming I need to power wash up the latex paint?

Looking at the garage tiles you can throw down and lock into place, but they seems expensive. Any alternatives or ideas?

Thanks!
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Old 03-19-2012, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
44,544 posts, read 61,229,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShakyJ View Post
Looking at the garage tiles you can throw down and lock into place, but they seems expensive. Any alternatives or ideas?Thanks!
We did the lock down tiles a few years ago. Cost about $1.50 sq ft. Never have to worry about cleaning concrete again or touching up the epoxy floor every so many years.
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Old 03-19-2012, 04:46 AM
 
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Tiles at $1.50 psf ... if they meet your expectations for cosmetics and performance ... are an exceptionally good value. A clean floor is all you need for a substrate.

Epoxy floors with a polyurethane seal coat can give you years of service, but are much more pricey to install correctly. You must remove all of the existing coating to a clean, dry, open, porous, and accepting surface to provide a substrate which an epoxy can bond to. You cannot apply epoxy over the latex coating; it will have to be ground or shot-blasted off. Either of those two mechanical preps will yield an appropriate concrete surface. The big box store epoxy deck kits that I've seen installed aren't worth the money; they are typically inadequate mil thickness and don't have a good quality catalyzed polyurethane top coat. They may look good for awhile, but don't have good abrasion or hot-tire pick-up resistance, so generally fail rather quickly if you are using the garage for your vehicles. Professional quality epoxy/urethane systems, either in solid colors or broadcast color flakes, are running a few dollars per square foot and up just for the materials, so these floors will be a lot more expensive to install than the tiles.

An alternative to these systems would be to do an acid-stain floor. Again, the concrete would need to be ground or shot-blasted, but then it can be colored in a wide range of decorative tints and stains. Depending upon the artistic talents and skills of the stain applicator, cosmetically these floors can have a nominally solid color or a widely varied blend of colors with a lot of eye appeal. Sealing over this would be a layer of epoxy top-coated with a catalyzed polyurethane to create enough millage to resist hot-tire pick-up of the floor coating system. The materials are fairly easy to use, but correct floor prep is essential; if you can rent a grinder for nominal money, then it's not too tough a job to do (although a bit on the nasty side ... appropriate personal safety gear is not optional for your eyes, lungs, and hearing). If not, it's best to get a concrete prep company involved, if not a complete installation ... from a pro.

Properly installed with commercial/professional quality materials, the epoxy floors are capable of giving many years of performance. We've installed them in high traffic retail stores, restaurants, commercial vehicle repair shops, fire department stations, industrial utility spaces, and home garages. But this level of performance doesn't come inexpensively and is best suited for a high-grade finish where you want the cosmetic impact and durable performance. If, OTOH, you are just preparing a residential garage for cosmetic appeal for re-sale, then the expense for a quality floor system may not be justifiable.

Last edited by sunsprit; 03-19-2012 at 05:08 AM..
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
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Seems the issue is that in order to use a good multi part epoxy (no matter the brand) then you will have to remove all the present latex paint to bare concrete. I know this would kill the deal for me.

I have used Rustoleum one part epoxy which is acrylic base and will adhere to latex. You will need to rough sand the present latex floor. This can be done with a drywall sanding attachment so you can stand up while doing it. It will not be as durable as two part expoxy but it is easy to work with and to touch up. I did this on a screen porch concrete floor, so I cannot address hot tire pickup (where hot car tires soften/pickup the coating) issues that might exist in a garage. I suppose one could have mats on the floor where the tires rest on.

Hope this helps.
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Old 03-19-2012, 08:24 AM
 
Location: California
243 posts, read 1,200,864 times
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Appreciate the responses.
At $1.50/sq ft that sounds like it will work, but there are these for that price?
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Old 03-27-2012, 12:06 PM
SXN
 
350 posts, read 1,284,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitram View Post
We did the lock down tiles a few years ago. Cost about $1.50 sq ft. Never have to worry about cleaning concrete again or touching up the epoxy floor every so many years.
Can you give us some details on the installation process and some links to where those types of tiles can be found? I was going to go the epoxy route - but I'm presuming the prep work for tile is easier. Just don't know much about it or how it will look.
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Old 03-27-2012, 12:17 PM
SXN
 
350 posts, read 1,284,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunsprit View Post
An alternative to these systems would be to do an acid-stain floor. Again, the concrete would need to be ground or shot-blasted, but then it can be colored in a wide range of decorative tints and stains. Depending upon the artistic talents and skills of the stain applicator, cosmetically these floors can have a nominally solid color or a widely varied blend of colors with a lot of eye appeal. Sealing over this would be a layer of epoxy top-coated with a catalyzed polyurethane to create enough millage to resist hot-tire pick-up of the floor coating system. The materials are fairly easy to use, but correct floor prep is essential; if you can rent a grinder for nominal money, then it's not too tough a job to do (although a bit on the nasty side ... appropriate personal safety gear is not optional for your eyes, lungs, and hearing). If not, it's best to get a concrete prep company involved, if not a complete installation ... from a pro.
This is great info as I'm looking go the acid etching route for prepping my garage floor - it's covered with Latex paint also. Could you provide some links with the equipment and chemicals you'd reccomend for floor prep? e.g. grinder, the acid, epoxy, safety gear, decorative chips, poly etc?

Also, any good to know tips for prepping the surface?
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Old 03-27-2012, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,307 posts, read 38,663,829 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SXN View Post
This is great info as I'm looking go the acid etching route for prepping my garage floor - it's covered with Latex paint also. Could you provide some links with the equipment and chemicals you'd reccomend for floor prep? e.g. grinder, the acid, epoxy, safety gear, decorative chips, poly etc?

Also, any good to know tips for prepping the surface?
If you elect to acid stain your garage floor, don't skip any steps and don't take any half-measures. It's going to be a very labor intensive process for one guy that involves a few days of equipment rental and hard work, a few days of exposure to organic solvents/acid vapors and how good your end result will be is a function of a lot of variables, some of which are beyond your control. There's no reason that you can't get a professional result in a DIY job, but you're going to be on the steep portion of the learning curve the entire way and the pros have been on the plateau for a long time. If you wind up with a job that was obviously DIY then there wasn't any value add and the tiles are a lot more "undoable". There's a lot of art in staining concrete, setting floor tiles is just math, FWIW...
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:58 PM
 
28 posts, read 48,672 times
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My wife and I moved and needed to do something with our garage floor. We were going to go with the Rustoleum epoxy but we decided against it. We ended up using a professional company to do the install and have been soooo happy since.

One thing that helped us out was all the good information my wife found on garage flooring from All Garage Floors. They have an article here about the benefits of garage floor coatings. If we didn't do epoxy I think we would have done porcelain tile instead. We are so happy we didn't do the Rustoleum stuff. My brother did and he hasn't been happy with it.

If you are thinking about doing an epoxy floor yourself, I would recommend looking into everything that is involved. After I saw how it was done I don't think I would have felt comfortable doing it myself.
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