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Old 07-24-2012, 09:56 PM
 
Location: NY
14 posts, read 38,948 times
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Hi,

During a home inspection, the inspector found some electrical outlets in bathrooms and kitchen are not grounded.

Is it necessary???

Thanks in advance.

Last edited by blueprint_2012; 07-24-2012 at 09:57 PM.. Reason: Update
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Old 07-24-2012, 10:02 PM
 
4,676 posts, read 8,593,747 times
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Yes, it is. GFI's are part of electrical code.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:12 AM
 
2,463 posts, read 4,675,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocngypz View Post
Yes, it is. GFI's are part of electrical code.
There's a difference between GFIs and a ground wire.

And no ground wires are not always necessary.

If your house is wired pre-Romex and used BX armored cable, the armored cable is generally the ground wire, so you dont need a 3rd green wire. You do have to remember to connect the ground wires from fixtures to the METAL box though. Plastic boxes and BX dont mix.

If you are using Romex, then you need a ground wire, generally GREEN or bare.

And if you have knob and tube, run... or be prepared to rewire quickly.

A GFI is a ground fault interupter, an added safety device that requires a ground wire and will shut the outlet or circuit down if the flow of the current is interupted or otherwise impeded. These are required in wet and outdoor areas.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:28 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
19,916 posts, read 29,729,051 times
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I really hope you aren't asking this question to avoid the fix. When we sold our house the buyer's inspector found the same thing in one of our bathroom outlets. It cost a minimal amount and10 minutes to fix.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Long Island
9,301 posts, read 13,529,357 times
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bathrooms and kitchens are important because they are wet. Not to mention these are where appliances draw a lot of power (microwave, hair dryer). You want the GFIs. That's why it's a checklist item for the inspector.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:53 AM
 
2,463 posts, read 4,675,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueprint_2012 View Post
Hi,

During a home inspection, the inspector found some electrical outlets in bathrooms and kitchen are not grounded.

Is it necessary???

Thanks in advance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
bathrooms and kitchens are important because they are wet. Not to mention these are where appliances draw a lot of power (microwave, hair dryer). You want the GFIs. That's why it's a checklist item for the inspector.
The OP says the inspector says the outlets are not grounded. There's a BIG difference between not grounded and no GFI. if the outlet is grounded, adding a GFI is a simple replace the outlet. If the outlet is NOT grounded, replacing the outlet with a GFI is not only illegal but dangerous.
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Old 07-25-2012, 09:18 AM
 
1,144 posts, read 2,404,621 times
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Actually, as per the NEC, if there is no equipment ground available, the elctrician has a few options. The receptacle may be replaced with a two-prong non grounding receptacle (as I did). or protect the circuit with a GFCI. A GFCI does not need the ground to do its job, any leaking of current out of the circuit will trip the gfi. However, each receptacle installed in this manner must be marked "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND"
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Old 07-25-2012, 09:29 AM
 
2,463 posts, read 4,675,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckthedog View Post
Actually, as per the NEC, if there is no equipment ground available, the elctrician has a few options. The receptacle may be replaced with a two-prong non grounding receptacle (as I did). or protect the circuit with a GFCI. A GFCI does not need the ground to do its job, any leaking of current out of the circuit will trip the gfi. However, each receptacle installed in this manner must be marked "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND"
Thats the NEC. Many state and local codes are stricter than the NEC.
YMMV depending where you live.

For example, ROMEX was illegal in NYC until the early 2000s. Its only legal now for residential 2 floors or less single family houses. BX Armored or metal conduit required in all other residential and commercial.

Chicago requires solid metal conduit in all structrures and then BX armored inside the metal conduit (refits must be costly). I know they had a big fire that burned the city down, but this sounds like overkill to me.

Point being, with LI and all its jurisdictions, the code may be different town to town or village to village.

2 prong non-grounded in a wet area would violate code now in most places. If you do work on that circuit, it must be brought up to current code.
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Old 07-25-2012, 09:39 AM
 
667 posts, read 1,354,671 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckthedog View Post
Actually, as per the NEC, if there is no equipment ground available, the elctrician has a few options. The receptacle may be replaced with a two-prong non grounding receptacle (as I did). or protect the circuit with a GFCI. A GFCI does not need the ground to do its job, any leaking of current out of the circuit will trip the gfi. However, each receptacle installed in this manner must be marked "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND"

Adding a GFCI and marking it appropriately seems like the best solution.

I have seen outlets where the neutral was jumped to the ground screw -is that acceptable or dangerous?
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:21 AM
 
2,463 posts, read 4,675,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peabodyn View Post
Adding a GFCI and marking it appropriately seems like the best solution.

I have seen outlets where the neutral was jumped to the ground screw -is that acceptable or dangerous?
Neutral to ground is probably not the best thing to be doing.

Please check your local codes to see if adding a GFCI marked is code for your area first! When in doubt hire a licensed electrician!!
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