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Old 11-08-2012, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,652 posts, read 16,759,496 times
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I grew up in - and live in a home with a kitchen whose sink layout I became accustomed to: a sink divided into wash and rinse portions with a dish rack on the side. When doing dishes, we put a tub into the rinse portion to hold the rinse water. After washing and rinsing them, we placed the dishes on the dish rack to dry, and then once dried, into their proper places. That's the way I think it should be.

Yet I am currently working at a house with a setup I find quite bizarre. I also lived in an apartment like this once for a few months. The wash and the rinse are separate with a garbage disposal in the center of them. The rinse does not have a tub and there is no space for a dish rack, so you have to rinse and put away the dishes one-by-one. The worst thing is the places for the plates, silverware, etc. are even farther than at my house, requiring you to actually walk a fair amount just to put a spoon away. Does anybody actually prefer this? Why were kitchens designed like this? On the positive side, it does feature a dishwasher (something my kitchen had absolutely no room for), and I had to actually learn how to use it, but it does not seem to save much time or effort over manually washing all dishes.
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Old 11-08-2012, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
33,514 posts, read 35,379,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
I grew up in - and live in a home with a kitchen whose sink layout I became accustomed to: a sink divided into wash and rinse portions with a dish rack on the side. When doing dishes, we put a tub into the rinse portion to hold the rinse water. After washing and rinsing them, we placed the dishes on the dish rack to dry, and then once dried, into their proper places. That's the way I think it should be.

Yet I am currently working at a house with a setup I find quite bizarre. I also lived in an apartment like this once for a few months. The wash and the rinse are separate with a garbage disposal in the center of them. The rinse does not have a tub and there is no space for a dish rack, so you have to rinse and put away the dishes one-by-one. The worst thing is the places for the plates, silverware, etc. are even farther than at my house, requiring you to actually walk a fair amount just to put a spoon away. Does anybody actually prefer this? Why were kitchens designed like this? On the positive side, it does feature a dishwasher (something my kitchen had absolutely no room for), and I had to actually learn how to use it, but it does not seem to save much time or effort over manually washing all dishes.
I am having a hard time visualizing what you are describing.

What do you mean by "the rinse does not have a tub?" Is it like this?

Elkay ECGR4822L-2 Harmony Double Bowl Kitchen Sink with Drainboard - Stainless Steel - Faucet Depot

If so, you have to wash and rinse in the larger basin. You can use a plastic tub set inside the sink to hold the dirty dishes and dishwater and rinse under running water. The dish rack goes on the drain board.

A dishwasher works best if you have enough dishes to fill it up before you run it. I only run mine two or three times a week. There are only two of us in the household. We have plenty of glasses, cups, plates, and silverware to last until the racks are full. If you do that, you will only occasionally need to wash something by hand. Thrift stores are a great place to pick up extra dishes.

The kitchen layout is just something you have to work with.

Some photos would be helpful.

Last edited by suzy_q2010; 11-08-2012 at 05:12 PM..
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:09 PM
 
5,342 posts, read 8,967,914 times
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I don't like dish racks. I only hand wash the few things I can't put into the dishwasher, and I dry them right away and put them away.

I like the clean, uncluttered look, and a dish rack with or without dishes looks like clutter to me.
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:23 PM
 
Location: somewhere between Lk. Michigan & Lk. Huron
5,585 posts, read 896,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
I grew up in - and live in a home with a kitchen whose sink layout I became accustomed to: a sink divided into wash and rinse portions with a dish rack on the side. When doing dishes, we put a tub into the rinse portion to hold the rinse water. After washing and rinsing them, we placed the dishes on the dish rack to dry, and then once dried, into their proper places. That's the way I think it should be.

Does your rinse water side hold water in the sink? I ask this, since my rinse side of the sink does not hold the water all the time, the plug is not good, guess I should put a tub inside my sink too. Gets tiring buying new sink plugs.

Yet I am currently working at a house with a setup I find quite bizarre. I also lived in an apartment like this once for a few months. The wash and the rinse are separate with a garbage disposal in the center of them. The rinse does not have a tub and there is no space for a dish rack, so you have to rinse and put away the dishes one-by-one. The worst thing is the places for the plates, silverware, etc. are even farther than at my house, requiring you to actually walk a fair amount just to put a spoon away. Does anybody actually prefer this? Why were kitchens designed like this? On the positive side, it does feature a dishwasher (something my kitchen had absolutely no room for), and I had to actually learn how to use it, but it does not seem to save much time or effort over manually washing all dishes.
Am I correct by my guess, when you say there is no rinse tub, instead trying to say there is a rinsing hose beside the faucet, for spraying the dishes off with ?
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Old 11-08-2012, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
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A dishwasher doesn't save time in terms of how fast the dishes are done because home dishwashers take a long time to run, usually 90-120 minutes. Even a fully jam packed dishwasher load could be washed by hand in a lot less time. It does allow you to hand off that task to a machine so that during those two hours you can be doing something else, so in that way it DOES save time. It also saves some effort, and for most people it actually saves water/energy. (A few people who are really efficient at washing by hand may not experience a savings there, but for the vast majority the dishwasher will use less water and less energy overall even considering the electricity that it uses.)

I'm not sure I quite get all the nuances of what you are trying to describe about the sink. To me, a sink can have various configurations and saying a two-bowl sink has a "wash" side and a "rinse" side is really not something that's been done much within my lifetime (41 years). Some people prefer to have a large single bowl sink. Some sinks come with one larger side and one smaller. My house has a typical stainless two-bowl where both sides are the same size, and that is also what my house had when I was growing up.

But anyway, the reality of today's kitchens is that washing normal tableware would not be considered a typical use of the sink. In fact this is one of the arguments towards having a large single bowl sink, because then you can more easily wash those things that can't (or typically don't) go in the machine, like a large baking pan or large stock pot or whatever. Reasons for still having a two-bowl sink tend to be more about cooking prep or such than cleaning, such as one smaller bowl and one larger, although you'll still get some argument as to which should have the disposal in that configuration.

The idea of doing a ton of dishes at homes using a two-bowl sink, tub, drying rack, etc. has been fading for decades in my experience. Even growing up 30-odd years ago it is not something I ever experienced at home.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
7,652 posts, read 16,759,496 times
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Here's a picture of my kitchen



As you can see, there's a dish rack and tub in the rinse division of the sink. No trash disposal (we live out in the country and use it as compost for our garden) or dishwasher (not enough room in kitchen). As you can see, my mother doesn't really see a problem with clutter! (And neither do I - I'm so used to it, and a "minimalist" environment seems lacking in something to me)

Here's a picture of my kitchen in Florida, where I stayed for 2 months on an internship:


P1030858 by tvdxer, on Flickr

No dish rack, no tub in sink, and no dishwasher, but with a trash disposal.
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Old 11-08-2012, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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But neither of those is a photo of the current sink?
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Looks normal to me. What's the problem?
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:39 AM
 
3,244 posts, read 6,942,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg42 View Post
A dishwasher doesn't save time in terms of how fast the dishes are done because home dishwashers take a long time to run, usually 90-120 minutes. Even a fully jam packed dishwasher load could be washed by hand in a lot less time. It does allow you to hand off that task to a machine so that during those two hours you can be doing something else, so in that way it DOES save time. It also saves some effort, and for most people it actually saves water/energy. (A few people who are really efficient at washing by hand may not experience a savings there, but for the vast majority the dishwasher will use less water and less energy overall even considering the electricity that it uses.)

I'm not sure I quite get all the nuances of what you are trying to describe about the sink. To me, a sink can have various configurations and saying a two-bowl sink has a "wash" side and a "rinse" side is really not something that's been done much within my lifetime (41 years). Some people prefer to have a large single bowl sink. Some sinks come with one larger side and one smaller. My house has a typical stainless two-bowl where both sides are the same size, and that is also what my house had when I was growing up.

But anyway, the reality of today's kitchens is that washing normal tableware would not be considered a typical use of the sink. In fact this is one of the arguments towards having a large single bowl sink, because then you can more easily wash those things that can't (or typically don't) go in the machine, like a large baking pan or large stock pot or whatever. Reasons for still having a two-bowl sink tend to be more about cooking prep or such than cleaning, such as one smaller bowl and one larger, although you'll still get some argument as to which should have the disposal in that configuration.

The idea of doing a ton of dishes at homes using a two-bowl sink, tub, drying rack, etc. has been fading for decades in my experience. Even growing up 30-odd years ago it is not something I ever experienced at home.
Unless you are washing fine china/sterling (which should be done by hand), a dishwasher on each side of the double/triple sink allows you to stagger the cleaning, i.e. one is running while the other is being filled. Ultimately, 'saving time' is not really an issue, as the machines do all the work, there is enough washer space to handle quite a few number of people's dinnerware, and it is more of a 'set and forget'. Being with a semi-pro chef, she makes a huge mess (well not a mess, just a lot of dishes), and the dishwashers are a god-send. (Well, a butler's kitchen helps a lot too, as it is essentially a 2nd kitchen).
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Old 11-09-2012, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 22,728,731 times
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So I see two pictures of typical 2-bowl sinks with same size bowls. The upper one is in a very old kitchen, probably 50 years old. Dishwashers wouldn't have been too common yet. The lower one is a newer kitchen than that but as noted was designed with no dishwasher. Which isn't to say they might not have chosen a different sink, but this kind of 2-bowl is a basic extremely common design so is fairly likely in a low-end kitchen. (Still I've been in dishwasher-less kitchens that had a single bowl sink, which saves a few bucks on plumbing if not the sink itself.)

When a modern kitchen is designed around having a dishwasher in it, less thought is put into using the sink for routine washing of dishes, for obvious reasons. It's that simple. Sink designs have thus evolved to serve other possible uses better, such as food prep. Most of those sink designs cost a little more so lower end houses might still end up with a sink of the above-pictured design. When this cost saving is not an issue, though, what kind of sink becomes more of a personal preference. Some people do large single bowls, some people do two bowls of uneven sizes. I've seen a fairly deep divided sink that the divider only comes up halfway, so you could still get something large down under the faucet to rinse and wash. Lots of different shapes and sizes are possible.
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