U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-24-2013, 01:28 PM
 
1 posts, read 20,152 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

just hoping to get some clarification about water baseboard heaters. we live in an apartment building and were told the other day that we needed to have 3 feet of clearance around any one of our baseboard heaters in out unit, as per fire regulation.
i was told that water baseboard heaters would never get hot enough to ignite items around it. we've always allowed a few inches to be on the safe side but 3 feet seems a wee bit ridiculous.
this info came directly from a fire inspector who visited our unit. however funny part is, we had already spoken to 2 different ppl from their office who never mentioned anything about clearance from these heaters when we called for info. someone please help!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-24-2013, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
15,496 posts, read 57,932,217 times
Reputation: 19366
He obviously mistook the baseboard heaters for electric heaters.
Having at least 8-12" of clearance will help with convection; but it would be highly unlikely to start a fire- unless you're storing highly flammable/ low flash temp products in the house you have little too worry about.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2013, 11:22 PM
 
Location: NW Philly Burbs
2,431 posts, read 5,171,621 times
Reputation: 3374
Only if you have huge rooms!! It would really be impossible to arrange many rooms with 3' of clearance around the perimeter.

Go online and look up your local fire department and see what their regulations are, in writing. Your town/township might also have specific codes regarding this.

I remember looking at one apartment where a double closet was added to a bedroom that had baseboard heaters. The heaters ran through the closet!!!! I thought that was a little unsafe, to say the least!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2013, 02:06 AM
 
41,823 posts, read 46,463,446 times
Reputation: 17775
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blinx View Post
I remember looking at one apartment where a double closet was added to a bedroom that had baseboard heaters. The heaters ran through the closet!!!! I thought that was a little unsafe, to say the least!
How is it you think those pipes get to other parts of the rooms? They run through holes in bare wood whether it's walls, joists etc. Those pipes are in direct connect with numerous materials that are combustible throughout a home. Hydronic piping has been used for ohh I don't know a century. It's never been a fire hazard. Typical water temperature in those pipes is not going to exceed 180 and wood needs temperatures nearly 5 times that to spontaneously combust.

I don't know what the temperature of an oil/water filled electric baseboard heater operates at but it's going to be similar, matter of fact I would assume they are actually safer that the more common radiant electric baseboard.

It's the cheap standalone radiant electric heaters that are the issue becsue those produce very high temperatures near the source and anything combustible near them can potentially catch fire.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2013, 02:16 AM
 
Location: Florida
22,649 posts, read 23,298,664 times
Reputation: 26748
I would listen to him.
Of course you'll probably have to put your dressers on top of your bed but what the hell....use your creativity.

Seriously, we had HW Baseboard for many years and will only caution against something like a long couch in front of one which will block a lot of the heat from that section
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2013, 07:53 AM
 
Location: NW Philly Burbs
2,431 posts, read 5,171,621 times
Reputation: 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
How is it you think those pipes get to other parts of the rooms? They run through holes in bare wood whether it's walls, joists etc. Those pipes are in direct connect with numerous materials that are combustible throughout a home. Hydronic piping has been used for ohh I don't know a century. It's never been a fire hazard. Typical water temperature in those pipes is not going to exceed 180 and wood needs temperatures nearly 5 times that to spontaneously combust.

I don't know what the temperature of an oil/water filled electric baseboard heater operates at but it's going to be similar, matter of fact I would assume they are actually safer that the more common radiant electric baseboard.

It's the cheap standalone radiant electric heaters that are the issue becsue those produce very high temperatures near the source and anything combustible near them can potentially catch fire.
Hmmm... good points. So, no code violations, just very inefficient heating -- you'd have to leave the doors open all the time to heat the room. No thanks!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2013, 10:16 AM
 
20,814 posts, read 62,294,358 times
Reputation: 40056
For those who remember my rant against building codes being co-opted and used as a means of power by those without a clue, I offer the OP as an example.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Cold Springs, NV
4,572 posts, read 11,039,066 times
Reputation: 5092
I would ask for this 3' rule to be provided in writing. A verbal message means nothing without being documented.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2013, 02:52 PM
 
41,823 posts, read 46,463,446 times
Reputation: 17775
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blinx View Post
Hmmm... good points. So, no code violations, just very inefficient heating -- you'd have to leave the doors open all the time to heat the room. No thanks!
Well yea if that is the only source of heat for the room I can see that as a problem. LOL I've seen bare pipe run through closets just to get it to the next section of heating but I've never seen them used as heat.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2013, 02:56 PM
 
41,823 posts, read 46,463,446 times
Reputation: 17775
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrWillys View Post
I would ask for this 3' rule to be provided in writing. A verbal message means nothing without being documented.
I don't see how it can be three inches let alone 3 feet. The 3 feet rule will apply to heater like this:

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top