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Old 09-04-2013, 06:53 AM
 
2 posts, read 5,485 times
Reputation: 11

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Give your idea for my new flat..
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Old 09-04-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 38,728,951 times
Reputation: 39117
It does where I live.
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
13,176 posts, read 50,681,278 times
Reputation: 15389
Yes, no, and maybe.
It depends on what, or how you're comparing.

Initial cost, weight, lifespan, appearance, etc.
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:19 AM
 
Location: So California
8,671 posts, read 9,128,958 times
Reputation: 4732
Yes, but only about 4x$. Now I say that vs standard 30 year composition shingles...
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
5,615 posts, read 13,059,142 times
Reputation: 2539
Typically, but worth it IMO.
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
14,233 posts, read 10,235,373 times
Reputation: 10570
About 20 years ago, I priced out a Follansbee Terne* coated stainless steel standing seam roof versus asphalt shingle. The metal roofing was 30% of the weight, had a much longer warranty (50 years) and was about 10% more expensive than the shingle. The company would even rent the seamer to do the standing seam. For an owner-builder, it was a no-brainer - go metal.

Unfortunately, Follansbee went out of business recently.

*Terne roofing - a lead-tin plated steel panel, corrosion resistant, and very durable. Jefferson's Monticello had a terne roof (200+ years old). Recent changes in government regs have discouraged the use of lead in building products, so Follansbee had to change their recipe - which may have contributed to their unfortunate demise after 110 years in the business.
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Old 09-04-2013, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Meggett, SC
10,708 posts, read 9,293,291 times
Reputation: 5996
Yes, especially standing seam but worth every penny. Lower utility costs, lighter, and for people like myself in a hurricane area, they are better in storms.
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Old 09-05-2013, 01:18 AM
 
48,509 posts, read 85,517,020 times
Reputation: 18097
flat roof is not good for steel roof as last I remember it requires one in twelve pitch even on a patio. Better something like a Bry or other sealed membrane. Bry is a rolled type which the seams are torched to seal together and then trim around the edge. Basically you end up with a one piece roof with trim around edges. Best I have seen on a flat or low pitch roof.
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Old 09-19-2013, 01:09 AM
 
15 posts, read 76,557 times
Reputation: 14
Metal roofing is a premium home product, you can expect your new roof to cost roughly two to three times what an asphalt shingle roof costs. However, a metal roof is comparable in price to tile roofing or cedar shake roofing. If you currently have a slate roof, you can expect your metal roof to cost less.
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Old 09-19-2013, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,553,379 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
flat roof is not good for steel roof as last I remember it requires one in twelve pitch even on a patio. Better something like a Bry or other sealed membrane. Bry is a rolled type which the seams are torched to seal together and then trim around the edge. Basically you end up with a one piece roof with trim around edges. Best I have seen on a flat or low pitch roof.
I had a "rubber roof" installed on my nearly flat back porch probably 5 or 6 years ago, and it solved all the problems with leaks from ice dams I'd been having. I think it might actually be a sealed membrane under a name popular with locals because the installers did seal it.
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