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Old 10-29-2013, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Long Island
9,531 posts, read 15,890,648 times
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Looks like spray foam. Anyone ever had it done in their attic? It's dawned on me that the reason the 2nd floor gets so cold is not because the walls have insufficient insulation (we made sure they put a high R-value and we have new windows), but because the ceiling (attic floor) probably isn't properly insulated and the source of heat loss is upwards. Anyone have cellulose insulation added who could give me a ballpark figure? They would also have to remove the attic floor boards to get to it too. Did it make a big difference? Is cellulose the best for its cost as well?
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Old 10-29-2013, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
7,327 posts, read 12,346,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
Looks like spray foam. Anyone ever had it done in their attic? It's dawned on me that the reason the 2nd floor gets so cold is not because the walls have insufficient insulation (we made sure they put a high R-value and we have new windows), but because the ceiling (attic floor) probably isn't properly insulated and the source of heat loss is upwards. Anyone have cellulose insulation added who could give me a ballpark figure? They would also have to remove the attic floor boards to get to it too. Did it make a big difference? Is cellulose the best for its cost as well?
The problem with cellulose insulation in the attic is that it settles, losing its R-value over time. I presume this is the reason why our builder used cellulose in the walls but blown Owens Corning pink fiberglass insulation in the attic.
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Old 10-29-2013, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Rural Michigan
6,341 posts, read 14,692,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
The problem with cellulose insulation in the attic is that it settles, losing its R-value over time. I presume this is the reason why our builder used cellulose in the walls but blown Owens Corning pink fiberglass insulation in the attic.
Your quote doesn't make any sense - if cellulose were to settle significantly in the walls, you would have have uninsulated space at the top of your walls and no way to repair it without damaging the drywall. cellulose settles at a predictable rate, with very little loss of r-value. it's also far better at preventing air-infiltration than blown fiberglass. I actually have family members that own two houses in the same subdivision/builder, one home has blown cellulose in the attic, the other has blown fiberglass in the attic - the home with cellulose doesn't heat up as fast as the home with fiberglass, you can actually feel the difference in those months where we have cold nights and hot days.. As for cost - I had 10 inches of cellulose blown over my existing blown fiberglass a few years back - approximately 1800 sq/ft of coverage @ 10 in depth, and it was ~$800-ish installed.. It made a huge difference going from r-19 to r-49 ~ ish.. (most insulation guys quote an r-value for blown cellulose at r-3 point something per inch of depth, and they'll blow in a little extra to account for normal settling). I didn't need r-49 in my climate, but the cost difference between a 3-inch topper and 10 inches wasn't much, so we let them go deep.. Our A/C kicks on later in the day, and doesn't run as long when it does kick on.. I suspect the improvement is as much from a reduction in air-infiltration reduction as it is from increased r-value.. pulling up floorboards and such could add significantly to the cost.. though they might be able to just drill access holes and pump it in.
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Old 10-29-2013, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
7,327 posts, read 12,346,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zippyman View Post
Your quote doesn't make any sense - if cellulose were to settle significantly in the walls, you would have have uninsulated space at the top of your walls and no way to repair it without damaging the drywall. cellulose settles at a predictable rate, with very little loss of r-value. it's also far better at preventing air-infiltration than blown fiberglass. I actually have family members that own two houses in the same subdivision/builder, one home has blown cellulose in the attic, the other has blown fiberglass in the attic - the home with cellulose doesn't heat up as fast as the home with fiberglass, you can actually feel the difference in those months where we have cold nights and hot days.. As for cost - I had 10 inches of cellulose blown over my existing blown fiberglass a few years back - approximately 1800 sq/ft of coverage @ 10 in depth, and it was ~$800-ish installed.. It made a huge difference going from r-19 to r-49 ~ ish.. (most insulation guys quote an r-value for blown cellulose at r-3 point something per inch of depth, and they'll blow in a little extra to account for normal settling). I didn't need r-49 in my climate, but the cost difference between a 3-inch topper and 10 inches wasn't much, so we let them go deep.. Our A/C kicks on later in the day, and doesn't run as long when it does kick on.. I suspect the improvement is as much from a reduction in air-infiltration reduction as it is from increased r-value.. pulling up floorboards and such could add significantly to the cost.. though they might be able to just drill access holes and pump it in.
Our walls use wet spray cellulose containing water and adhesives, which doesn't settle. I never heard of wet spray cellulose being used in attics since it would probably be too heavy; cellulose insulation in attics is typically blown dry.
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Old 10-29-2013, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
20,293 posts, read 37,201,327 times
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You still can blow dry cellulose insulation without having to remove the attic floor boards. All depends on the expertise of the person doing the work, but it's pretty much as follows: if the attic has a floor it means that it has joists. Right? If that's the case, a series of holes are drilled between the floor joists at one end of the floor, and a series of holes are drilled between the corresponding joists at the other end of the floor. Now blow the insulation into the floor though a hole at one end of the floor, and watch for the insulation to start blowing out of the opposite hole at the other end of the floor. When the insulation starts blowing out, the space between those two joists has been filled. Go to the next set of joists...and so on.

Of course I am assuming that the attic is not insulated and the area between the joists is empty. If the floor is already insulated he may not have enough room for more insulation. If that's the case he can add a subfloor on top of the existing floor using 2" to perhaps 4" rigid (blue color) insulating foam. The blue color foam is very dense and strong. If the OP wants to used the attic for storage or something, he still can install a cheap laminate floor on top of the rigid foam.
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Last edited by RayinAK; 10-29-2013 at 10:26 PM..
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Old 10-29-2013, 11:37 PM
 
5 posts, read 6,597 times
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The issue having cellulose warmth inside the basement is actually so it forms, burning off it is R-value over time. When i assume it is the reason why each of our designer applied cellulose inside the wall space however taken Owens Corning green fiberglass warmth inside the basement.
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Old 10-30-2013, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
17,475 posts, read 66,084,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rh71 View Post
Looks like spray foam. Anyone ever had it done in their attic? It's dawned on me that the reason the 2nd floor gets so cold is not because the walls have insufficient insulation (we made sure they put a high R-value and we have new windows), but because the ceiling (attic floor) probably isn't properly insulated and the source of heat loss is upwards. Anyone have cellulose insulation added who could give me a ballpark figure? They would also have to remove the attic floor boards to get to it too. Did it make a big difference? Is cellulose the best for its cost as well?

Does the attic have any insulation now? What kind does it appear to be (f/glass or cellulose)?

You can add f/glass to f/glass, cellulose to cellulose, and you can add f/glass to cellulose- adding cellulose on top of f/glass is not recommended because its weight will reduce the existing R-value of the f/glass.

If the attic is a walkup type that could be finished and is completely floored- yes, the flooring would need to come up (if you have no intention of ever finishing the attic) in order to install a sufficient amount of insulation.
Just blowing under the floor boards (if even possible)- as mentioned previously- will only yield you at best R-19. Today most regions of the US require at least R-38 (which is approximately 14" in depth).
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