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Old 12-23-2014, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
14,255 posts, read 14,780,819 times
Reputation: 22204

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Recently had a minor flood from a 15 year old GE washer. My first thought was well maybe time to buy new. I then decided to go poking around the Internet to see what I could find. There is a ton of information, videos, diagnoses, etc. out there. After a few hours it became evident that 95% of all brought the problem down to either the water level pressure switch or the water control valve.

I first did as someone suggested. I unplugged the machine, let is sit unplugged for a day or so. Plugged it back in. It behaved for a few loads then it screwed up again. I was watching it so I caught it before it overflowed. I could actually use it by shutting the water off then turning it back on at the appropriate cycle times. I did several loads that way as I needed to do laundry. This turning the water supply off then back on is actually is a test (found that on the Internet) to try and find out what part is the problem, the pressure switch or the control valve. The test says it is the control valve.

Well back to the Internet I went. I went to appliancepartspros site and looked up my machine model. They had a video on how to replace the parts on my specific machine. I did a test run of how to get at the parts to replace which are both right behind the top, operators panel. 4 screws and the panel open up. It went exactly as they had shown. The parts are right there, exactly as they had shown. Basically a no-brainer. Rather then mess with which part, I ordered both parts. $70 for both in my front door.

If this solves it great. If not, the worse I am out is $70 and I buy a new machine.

Point of this post is there is a wealth of information on the Internet and if someone is the least bit handy they may well be able to fix many things on there own.

I will keep you informed.
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Old 12-23-2014, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Ohio
2,310 posts, read 6,833,407 times
Reputation: 1951
Thanks for sharing. Quite interesting to read your post since something like this is bound to happen to any homeowner. Pls keep posting. Add pics if you can.
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Old 12-23-2014, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,614 posts, read 21,294,242 times
Reputation: 13675
Years ago I started having problems with a GE washer and did the same thing. In my case the hose that ran from the bleach fill developed a hole from rubbing against one of the tub struts, it didn't leak enough to run out the bottom but the bleach running down along the mechanicals caused some serious corrosion which ruined several parts. All the parts were available online at a pretty reasonable price along with lots of diagrams and message boards populated with knowledgeable folks. I would up rebuilding a good portion of the machine with no real problems.
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Old 12-24-2014, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
14,255 posts, read 14,780,819 times
Reputation: 22204
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
Recently had a minor flood from a 15 year old GE washer. My first thought was well maybe time to buy new. I then decided to go poking around the Internet to see what I could find. There is a ton of information, videos, diagnoses, etc. out there. After a few hours it became evident that 95% of all brought the problem down to either the water level pressure switch or the water control valve.

I first did as someone suggested. I unplugged the machine, let is sit unplugged for a day or so. Plugged it back in. It behaved for a few loads then it screwed up again. I was watching it so I caught it before it overflowed. I could actually use it by shutting the water off then turning it back on at the appropriate cycle times. I did several loads that way as I needed to do laundry. This turning the water supply off then back on is actually is a test (found that on the Internet) to try and find out what part is the problem, the pressure switch or the control valve. The test says it is the control valve.

Well back to the Internet I went. I went to appliancepartspros site and looked up my machine model. They had a video on how to replace the parts on my specific machine. I did a test run of how to get at the parts to replace which are both right behind the top, operators panel. 4 screws and the panel open up. It went exactly as they had shown. The parts are right there, exactly as they had shown. Basically a no-brainer. Rather then mess with which part, I ordered both parts. $70 for both in my front door.

If this solves it great. If not, the worse I am out is $70 and I buy a new machine.

Point of this post is there is a wealth of information on the Internet and if someone is the least bit handy they may well be able to fix many things on there own.

I will keep you informed.

UPDATE

Parts arrived via FEDEX this morning. Removed old parts. Installed new parts. Ran two loads of laundry. Varied the water level for each load. Worked fine. Will be keeping a close on it to be sure.
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Old 12-24-2014, 05:03 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, 615' Elevation, Zone 8b - originally from SF Bay Area
44,642 posts, read 81,368,328 times
Reputation: 57887
Good job, I hope that does the trick!
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Old 12-24-2014, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley
4,374 posts, read 11,239,687 times
Reputation: 4054
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post

Point of this post is there is a wealth of information on the Internet and if someone is the least bit handy they may well be able to fix many things on there own.
I know, it's amazing isn't it? Recently I needed to light the pilot on my gas fireplace (previous owner left no instruction manual) so I googled it and found what I needed to do it.

I was able t watch a video, then pause it, and do what it instructed, step by step. It was great, I am not really handy and here I had the whole thing taken apart and got it lit and saved a service call.
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